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Michael Ossipoff

Karl suggested that I haven’t defined 28&14 clearly enough. So let me say it more systematically.

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Though it’s inevitable that we won’t all like the same proposals, I don’t want what I say to be unclear, or to appear complicated. It isn’t complicated, and, if it seems so, then I haven’t worded it well.

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So, to that end, let me word 28&14 more systematically.  First let me discuss year-start-rules in a general way, as a description of Nearest-Monday as a completely general class of year-start rules.  

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…followed by a (hopefully better-worded) definition of 28&4, in the context of the general class of 7-day-week month-systems in which every month has a whole number of weeks.

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Nearest-Monday Year-Start  Rules:

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Start each calendar-year at the Monday-starting midnight that is closest to some (below-specified) intended-time.

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Choices for Intended-Time:

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1. January 1 of the current civil calendar. (as with ISO-WeekDate’s Nearest-Monday year-start rule.)

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2. A solstice or equinox of your choice. (My proposals use the South-Solstice, but people might prefer the North-Solstice  (The Egyptians used it as year-start), and I won’t deny that it, too, has appeal.)

3. Every 365.2422 days, start a year at the Monday-starting midnight that is closest to the end of that interval.

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…..3a)  The first 365.2422 day interval starts on an equinox or a solstice of your choice.

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…..3b)  The first 365.2422 day interval starts at some time when the Sun passed some ecliptic-longitude that is typical for the start of a Roman-Gregorian year.  Of course there’s a range of solar ecliptic-longitudes that could be chosen, because our Roman-Gregorian year starts at various solar ecliptic longitudes within a small range.  

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That choice of a solar ecliptic-longitude for that purpose could be made on the basis of what past year(s) you want the calendar’s correspondence of date and solar-ecliptic-longitude to resemble.

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Of course the South-Solstice Year (duration between two successive South-Solstices) or the North-Solstice Year (duration between two successive North-Solstices) could be substituted for the 365.2422 day Mean-Tropical-Year.

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(I refer to that chosen year as the Reference-Tropical-Year (RTY), and I use “Y” to designate its length.)

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I don’t recommend the equinox-years as RTYs, because of fairness-considerations between the populations north and south of the equator.   …because both the Winter-Solstice and the Summer-Solstice (for either population) can have a good case made for it as basis for RTY, or as the year-start date. 

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Familiarity with (northern) mid-winter year-start calls for starting the calendar on the South-Solstice.  But it has been pointed out that the North-Solstice Year is entering the beginning of a long period of relative length-constancy.

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Of course the year-start date and the RTY are separate independent choices, but there’s a case for the year-start date being important enough to recommend it as the basis for the RTY.

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The advantage of the Mean-Tropical-Year (MTY) as the RTY is practicality, as it doesn’t favor any time of year, as regards the length-constancy of the tropical-year measured from that time of year.

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But I must say that the North-Solstice-Year has much appeal for me, because it would recognize the arrival of the long Age of the North-Solstice (with regard to RTY length-constancy)…as I found out at Irv’s website.

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7-Day-Week Month-Systems With Whole-Number Of Years:

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Of course 364 is divisible by 7, and has as its prime-factors:  7 X13 X 2 X 2.

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That only leaves a few possibilities for a month with whole-number of weeks, and with length at least somewhat resembling what we’d consider a month.

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If all the months must be identical, then there could be 14 26-day months, but they wouldn’t consist of a whole number of weeks.

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For equal months, each with a whole number of weeks, and with a length at all qualifying as a “month”, that leaves only 28X13.

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It’s objected to because people don’t like the number 13, and because it doesn’t have equal quarter each with a whole number of weeks. It doesn’t even have half-years like that.

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I’d say that quarters are of interest mostly to CEOs, investors and financiers. But the 13 months seem to give 28lX13 a lot of unpopularity.

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But, as I’ve said, some people like 28X13, and so it can’t be ruled out as a proposal.

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But what about changes to 28X13 that would address its criticisms (at the expense of losing identical division-periods)?

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Of course, to keep each division-period to a whole number of weeks, only whole weeks can be moved among the division-periods. 

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If it’s desired to achieve 12 months (so as to be able to give them the Roman names), thereby making quarters, then, for maximum month-length-uniformity,  the 4 weeks from one of the 28-day months would each be added to one of the other 12 months…resulting in 4 months with 35-day length.    …resulting in the 28,35,28 quarters.

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But I suggest, and many others (discussed later) agree, that there more meaningfully are 6 seasons, rather than 4. 

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Naming seasons for the solar declination,  it’s meaningful to speak of a shorter Pre-Northward season after South and before Northward, and of a Pre-Southward season after North and before Southward.

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Therefore, the natural thing do with 28X13’s extra month is to divide it into two 2-week seasons, and place them as Pre-Northward and Pre-Southward.

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So, 28,35,28  and 28&14 are two different ways for achieving two different goals from modifying 28X13.

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I’ve described the seasonal advantages of 28&14.

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28,35,28 doesn’t claim any seasonal relevance.  With its start that coincides closely with Roman-Gregorian’s start, and with is Roman month-names,  28,35,28 seems to be intended to resemble Roman-Gregorian as much as possible.   What? With 28 and 35 day months?

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When 30,30,31 starts at a solar ecliptic longitude close to that on which Roman-Gregorian starts, _and with its month-lengths close to those of the Roman months_,  30,30,31 achieves seasonal continuity with Roman-Gregorian. People everywhere know what it seasonally means for a certain month to arrive, because the months are nearly identical to the Roman months.     That can’t be said of 28,35,28. 

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So, what do 28,35,28’s months mean?  I must confess that I have no idea.


5 Frimaire (Frost-Month) CCXXVII

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Michael Ossipoff

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