'drop leap year' for ISO leap week years and like

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'drop leap year' for ISO leap week years and like

Palmen, KEV (Karl)
Dear Calendar People

I found that the years that have a leap week (week 53) in the ISO week numbering can be constructed by having five of these years in each row, except when a leap year needs to be dropped one simply places the words 'drop leap year' in three year places. Each full row of five years corresponds to a 28-year cycle. Each row with 'drop leap year' corresponds to 12 years. Then having made one full row:

1987 1992 1998 2004 2009

one can easily make the other rows:

1807 1812 1818 1824 1829
1835 1840 1846 1852 1857
1863 1868 1874 1880 1885
1891 1896 drop leap year
1903 1908 1914 1920 1925
1931 1936 1942 1948 1953
1959 1964 1970 1976 1981
1987 1992 1998 2004 2009
2015 2020 2026 2032 2037
2043 2048 2054 2060 2065
2071 2076 2082 2088 2093
2099 drop leap year 2105
2111 2116 2122 2128 2133
2139 2144 2150 2156 2161
2167 2172 2178 2184 2189
2195 drop leap year 2201
and so on every 400 years.

Also, I've put the only leap week year of the 28-year-cycle whose number is even but not divisible by four in the middle of its row to make each row symmetrical.

Karl

07(15(19
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div.by 6 vs 28-yr distr. RE: 'drop leap year' for ISO leap week years and like

Brij Bhushan Vij

Karl, sir:                                                                                                                      While I may not argue to use my *divide by six(6) rule using 896-yr/159 LWks or 834-yr/148 LWks scheme*'; my observation against ISO LWks following is that this is NOT as simple as just divide by six(6) 'like our earlier divide by four(4) year to insert a Leap Day'.
     Among several schemes that I proposed using 364-day calendar formats, my ONE format 3-options should meet expectations for consideration of a World Calendar for All Ages.
Brij Bhushan Vij                                                                                                        (Wednesday – Kali 5106-W36-03)/D-356:(Thursday)2005 Dec22H0831(decimal)IST   Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah -Rg Veda                                                            Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30                                                             Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep:30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30                                                            (365th day of Year is World Day)                                                                             ******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendar******                                                          Telephone: +91-11-25590335  


From:  "Palmen, KEV (Karl)" <[hidden email]>
Reply-To:  East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]>
To:  [hidden email]
Subject:  'drop leap year' for ISO leap week years and like
Date:  Mon, 19 Dec 2005 12:56:58 -0000

>Dear Calendar People
>
>I found that the years that have a leap week (week 53) in the ISO week numbering can be constructed by having five of these years in each row, except when a leap year needs to be dropped one simply places the words 'drop leap year' in three year places. Each full row of five years corresponds to a 28-year cycle. Each row with 'drop leap year' corresponds to 12 years. Then having made one full row:
>
>1987 1992 1998 2004 2009
>
>one can easily make the other rows:
>
>1807 1812 1818 1824 1829
>1835 1840 1846 1852 1857
>1863 1868 1874 1880 1885
>1891 1896 drop leap year
>1903 1908 1914 1920 1925
>1931 1936 1942 1948 1953
>1959 1964 1970 1976 1981
>1987 1992 1998 2004 2009
>2015 2020 2026 2032 2037
>2043 2048 2054 2060 2065
>2071 2076 2082 2088 2093
>2099 drop leap year 2105
>2111 2116 2122 2128 2133
>2139 2144 2150 2156 2161
>2167 2172 2178 2184 2189
>2195 drop leap year 2201
>and so on every 400 years.
>
>Also, I've put the only leap week year of the 28-year-cycle whose number is even but not divisible by four in the middle of its row to make each row symmetrical.
>
>Karl
>
>07(15(19