calendars and board games

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calendars and board games

Lance Latham
Group -

I have been looking into an interesting possible
connection lately, and it seems time to see what
others have to say.

Specifically, I have been looking at Egyptian board
games.

(1) The first is known as 'senet', a board game known
from Predynastic times that is similar to, and thought
to be a possible ancestor of, backgammon. The game was
played by commoners and royalty alike, and dozens of
sets are known.

The board itself is a 3x10 rectangle, on which game
pieces move in a boustrephedon pattern from upper left
to lower right. Certain squares near the end of the
path bear specific marks, even in the earliest sets.
In late sets, all 30 squares bear a symbol with
religious significance. It is probably such later sets
that appear in Kotzwinkle's 'The Game of Thirty',
which I highly recommend.

Some authors claim that the game was 'later'
assimilated to a lunar calendar, which I find strange,
given the structure of the board and the 'countdown'
numbers at the end of the path. I note also the
relation between the rectangular grid and the
organization of the Egyptian month.

(2) Looking further, one finds the traditional game
known as 'Hounds and Jackals', played on a board that
marks two separate paths, each of 29 holes, with the
15th hole possessing a special mark. Lunar association
seems fairly obvious, but I find little material so
far, and nothing indicating such an association. For
Stonehenge scholars, the game is also known as the
'Game of 58 holes'.

(3) Egyptians also played a game possibly known as
'aseb', which appears to have been imported from
Mesopotamia, and bears a strong resemblance to the
'Royal Game of Ur'. It is also known as the 'Game of
Twenty', to denote the number of squares on the board.


The board itself is more complex than a simple
rectangle. Like 'senet', this game appears to be a
'racing' game; later game boards in fact have a senet
board on one side and an aseb board on the other, and
use the same markers. The concept is very similar to
the cardboard game boards made today that have a
checkers board on one side and backgammonon the other.
Analysis of these boards indicates that the one
constant of design is the use of an 8-petal rosette
pattern in certain squares that permit a path to
encounter a rosette on every 4th square.

Aseb appears to be a simplified form of the
Mesopotamian game, the board of which has a 'bridge'
of 2 squares connecting a small rectangle of 3x2
squares and a larger rectangle of 3x4 squares. A board
structure known from Knossos may represent a similar
game.

The Mesopotamian board appears to have an 'entry'
square. I have examined the path length, in squares,
of paths that encounter rosettes on every 4th square,
and depending upon whether one counts the 'entry'
square as part of the path or not, one may count 20 or
19 squares on such paths. The number is suggestive of
the Metonic cycle. The rosette pattern also suggests,
to me, a role for the ogdoas, for several reasons
other than the strictly numerical association. For
one, the rosette is associated with Ishtar or Inana
(Venus), one of the 3 cosmic entities that figure in
the ogdoas.  

(4) Finally, there is a shadowy game known as 'mehen',
a name shared by a minor deity and the game. The name
means 'the coiled (one)', and the game board itself
has the form of a coiled serpent, divided into
rectangular parts.

Sets found so far include exquisitely carved game
pieces in the forms of lions and lionesses and colored
marbles. Interestingly, none of the pieces fit the
rectangular divisions. The animal pieces seem to come
in sets of three, and there appears to be a consensus
that mehen was a game for multiple players, perhaps as
many as 6; I have seen no explanation for this
conclusion so far.

Also interesting is the fact that the number of parts
into which the serpent board was divided varies
between game sets, so was apparently not a major
feature of game design.

Also intriguing is the fact that representations of
the mehen game cease rather suddenly, leading to the
conclusion that it was prohibited for some reason.

The Mehen serpent protects Ra by coiling around him.
In some accounts, the (explicitly female) serpent
coils around Ra's penis at night, and 'recharges' the
solar deity for the next day. I have not seen the
association published, but it seems to me that there
is an obvious association in this case between Mehen
and the Kundalini serpent, which coils around the
spine and exerts a powerful influence on 'psychic
energy'.

(5) Finally, I should note that in ALL of the above
games, we are lacking a written set of rules, so we do
not have a clear idea of how the games were played.
Several sets of possible rules have been proposed. The
analysis that I prefer so far is that of Piccione,
which is later and based on more examples. It also
seems to include a look at more factors and consider
more sources. For those who have a copy of the Papyrus
of Ani (a.k.a. 'The Book of the Dead') handy, I
understand that Chapter 17 treats the game of senet
explicitly as a religious metaphor.

(6) Somewhat further afield, I also located a Web page
that claims relations between the Phaistos disk and
these board games. While a number of explanations have
been proposed for the disk, some of them ludicrous,
this one actually makes some sense. Again, calendric
knowledge intrudes as a design factor.

If anyone on the list has something to contribute in
the way of additional ancient game-calendar
associations, bibliographic citations, etc., I should
like to hear of it.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





       
               
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Re: calendars and board games

Ivan Van Laningham
Hi All--

Lance Latham wrote:

>
> (3) Egyptians also played a game possibly known as
> 'aseb', which appears to have been imported from
> Mesopotamia, and bears a strong resemblance to the
> 'Royal Game of Ur'. It is also known as the 'Game of
> Twenty', to denote the number of squares on the board.
>
> The board itself is more complex than a simple
> rectangle. Like 'senet', this game appears to be a
> 'racing' game; later game boards in fact have a senet
> board on one side and an aseb board on the other, and
> use the same markers. The concept is very similar to
> the cardboard game boards made today that have a
> checkers board on one side and backgammonon the other.
> Analysis of these boards indicates that the one
> constant of design is the use of an 8-petal rosette
> pattern in certain squares that permit a path to
> encounter a rosette on every 4th square.
>

Is there an image of the board on the net?  Or do you have one you can
scan?

Metta,
Ivan
----------------------------------------------
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Re: calendars and board games

Palmen, KEV (Karl)
In reply to this post by Lance Latham
Dear Lance and Calendar People

The board of a game of chess or checkers has 64 squares.
It is about once every 63 days on average that an Ogam wheel sacrifice must occur. The sacrifice itself raises the count from 63 to 64.

Mean lunation = 30*(63/64) = 29.53125 days.

For a more accurate mean lunation a sacrifice once every 62 10/11 days on average would give a mean lunation of
30*(692/703) = 29.5305832... days.

This works out to be an average of
365.2423/(62 10/11) =
365.2423*11/692 =
5.80587... sacrifices per year.
The Ogam wheel does 6 per year less sacrifices cancelled for a leap day (about 0.24 per year) + Saltus lunae sacrifice (about 0.05 per year) giving
6.00 - 0.24 + 0.05 = 5.81.


I expect some calendar people could find calendrical significance in the game of Monopoly.

Karl

07(15(01

R7f-

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
[mailto:[hidden email]]On Behalf Of Lance Latham
Sent: 01 December 2005 15:01
To: [hidden email]
Subject: calendars and board games


Group -

I have been looking into an interesting possible
connection lately, and it seems time to see what
others have to say.
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Re: calendars and board games

Lance Latham
In reply to this post by Ivan Van Laningham
RE:

> > (3) Egyptians also played a game possibly known as
> > 'aseb', which appears to have been imported from
> > Mesopotamia,...

> Is there an image of the board on the net?  Or do
> you have one you can
> scan?

Lance replies:
Regarding aseb and its 'Ur' predecessor, you might
try:

http://www.tradgames.org.uk/games/Royal-Game-Ur.htm

Good images of the Ur game board and the Knossos game
board can be had at:

http://www.ahs.uwaterloo.ca/~museum/Archives/Brumbaugh/

A quick overview, no images, of these board games is
at:

http://indigo.ie/~marrya/boardgames.html

You can google 'Game of Twenty', 'aseb', and 'Royal
Game of Ur' to get many more Web pages.

Regarding senet, I found Piccione's material to be
thorough. Try:

http://www.cofc.edu/~piccione/senet_web.html

and:

http://www.cofc.edu/~piccione/senetcontents.html

Just googling 'senet' will turn up a lot of pages to
browse. Quite a few are selling game sets. Most quote
either Tim Kendall or R.C. Bell, or both, regarding
the proposed rules.

Likewise for 'mehen', just google that name. There
appears to be a general lack of material on the Net,
and what does exist is largely repetitious of a few
basic facts.

Similarly, google 'Hounds and Jackals' or 'Dogs and
Jackals' for pages. You can find a decent image and
intro at:

http://www.gamecabinet.com/history/DogsAndJackals.html

Also check:

http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/lahun/gameboard.html

for images of an old clay board.

Also note that the above sites can be explored for
other material on other pages.

For the page regarding the Phaistos disk, find the
e-book at:

http://www.recoveredscience.com/Phaistos1summary.htm

and linked pages.

I was favorably impressed, for example, by the
argument that treating the disk images as 'language'
is a poor idea because the figures are stamped. Use of
'movable type' for language would be a prochronism,
something like finding a Rolex on an Egyptian mummy's
wrist. Stamps were commonly used at the time for
making faience and clay parts for board games,
however. Regardless of your position, the e-book makes
interesting reading and a reasonable argument, in my
current relatively uninformed state.

Hope this helps.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





               
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Re: calendars and board games

Lance Latham
In reply to this post by Palmen, KEV (Karl)
RE:
> The board of a game of chess or checkers has 64
> squares...

> I expect some calendar people could find calendrical
> significance in the game of Monopoly.

Lance replies:
The question that I am raising here is not whether
certain games can have calendrical associations forced
upon them after the fact, but whether the games
themselves have origins in calendric knowledge.

If 'Hounds and Jackals', for example, is structurally
designed to consist of a pair of 29-hole paths, with
the fifteenth hole in each path marked as special in
some way, then I am inclined to inquire whether the
'game' is not based on the synodic lunar period. How
it may have been elaborated later, or given religious
associations, etc., is not directly germane to that
question.

It is also intriguing that the earliest game sets of
senet and other related board games appear to have had
seven game pieces, a number later reduced to five. If
a calendric association exists for early forms of the
game, then the number of game pieces to be put into
play and born off may be very relevant. 'Capture' by
landing on a square occupied by an opponent might
reflect eclipses or syzygies. As far as I know at this
time, these possibilities have not been explored.

Since the earliest senet boards appear to predate even
Predynastic times in Egypt, the game can be dated to
around 3100 B.C. and possibly even earlier. That fact
suggests to me that the hebdomadal week is not a
factor; if it is, the Egyptian development would
predate, and be independent of, the Akkadian or
Ammorite week inherited in time by the Jews.

Mostly, this question concerns historical evolution of
the games, insofar as that can be traced.

Regarding 'Monopoly', it is a 'race' type of board
game that traces its origins to games like senet.
Calendric interpretations could probably be imposed on
it, but that does not concern the question that I
raised.

Also, for those interested in pursuing this topic,
several sites on the Web have software versions of the
games that can be played on-line or downloaded.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





       
               
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Re: calendars and board games

Vladimir Pakhomov
In reply to this post by Lance Latham
Hello Lance,

> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lance Latham
> Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 6:01 PM
> ...
> I have been looking into an interesting possible
> connection lately, and it seems time to see what
> others have to say.
> Specifically, I have been looking at Egyptian board
> games.

You hit the right road.
 
> (4) Finally, there is a shadowy game known as 'mehen',
> a name shared by a minor deity and the game. The name
> means 'the coiled (one)', and the game board itself
> has the form of a coiled serpent, divided into
> rectangular parts.

This game is connected with a calendar.
 
> Sets found so far include exquisitely carved game
> pieces in the forms of lions and lionesses and colored
> marbles. Interestingly, none of the pieces fit the
> rectangular divisions. The animal pieces seem to come
> in sets of three, and there appears to be a consensus
> that mehen was a game for multiple players, perhaps as
> many as 6; I have seen no explanation for this
> conclusion so far.

I have the computer game "Mehen".
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/PSNeeley/Mehen.htm
You will find the game rules there.

> Also intriguing is the fact that representations of
> the mehen game cease rather suddenly, leading to the
> conclusion that it was prohibited for some reason.

Yes, it is the forbidden game.

> (6) Somewhat further afield, I also located a Web page
> that claims relations between the Phaistos disk and
> these board games. While a number of explanations have
> been proposed for the disk, some of them ludicrous,
> this one actually makes some sense. Again, calendric
> knowledge intrudes as a design factor.

Yes, the Mehen's board is similar to the Phaistos disk. But I did not think
about it.
 
> If anyone on the list has something to contribute in
> the way of additional ancient game-calendar
> associations, bibliographic citations, etc., I should
> like to hear of it.

You will find ancient game connected with a calendar in my book.
I very detailed have written about it.

Best regards,

Vladimir Pakhomov
http://pakhomov.com/
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Re: calendars and board games

VictorEngel
In reply to this post by Lance Latham
Looks vaguely like Chutes and Ladders. Is that also calendrical?

> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> [mailto:[hidden email]]On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
> Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 3:41 PM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: calendars and board games
>
>
> Hello Lance,
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> > [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lance Latham
> > Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 6:01 PM
> > ...
> > I have been looking into an interesting possible
> > connection lately, and it seems time to see what
> > others have to say.
> > Specifically, I have been looking at Egyptian board
> > games.
>
> You hit the right road.
>  
> > (4) Finally, there is a shadowy game known as 'mehen',
> > a name shared by a minor deity and the game. The name
> > means 'the coiled (one)', and the game board itself
> > has the form of a coiled serpent, divided into
> > rectangular parts.
>
> This game is connected with a calendar.
>  
> > Sets found so far include exquisitely carved game
> > pieces in the forms of lions and lionesses and colored
> > marbles. Interestingly, none of the pieces fit the
> > rectangular divisions. The animal pieces seem to come
> > in sets of three, and there appears to be a consensus
> > that mehen was a game for multiple players, perhaps as
> > many as 6; I have seen no explanation for this
> > conclusion so far.
>
> I have the computer game "Mehen".
> http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/PSNeeley/Mehen.htm
> You will find the game rules there.
>
> > Also intriguing is the fact that representations of
> > the mehen game cease rather suddenly, leading to the
> > conclusion that it was prohibited for some reason.
>
> Yes, it is the forbidden game.
>
> > (6) Somewhat further afield, I also located a Web page
> > that claims relations between the Phaistos disk and
> > these board games. While a number of explanations have
> > been proposed for the disk, some of them ludicrous,
> > this one actually makes some sense. Again, calendric
> > knowledge intrudes as a design factor.
>
> Yes, the Mehen's board is similar to the Phaistos disk. But I
> did not think
> about it.
>  
> > If anyone on the list has something to contribute in
> > the way of additional ancient game-calendar
> > associations, bibliographic citations, etc., I should
> > like to hear of it.
>
> You will find ancient game connected with a calendar in my book.
> I very detailed have written about it.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Vladimir Pakhomov
> http://pakhomov.com/
>
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Re: calendars and board games

VictorEngel
In reply to this post by Lance Latham
Dear Vladimir and Calendar People,

> I have the computer game "Mehen".
> http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/PSNeeley/Mehen.htm
> You will find the game rules there.
>

I tried following that link, but it didn't work. I found another site online
that had the rules. They remind me of another board game we used to play
called "Mensch ärgere Dich nicht" which is very similar to Parcheesi and
Aggravation.

Victor
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Re: calendars and board games

Charles Moyer
In reply to this post by Lance Latham
Perhaps Karl should ask himself why he has missed this point. An answer to
that question may help him see the relevance of the Ogam Wheel to the
discussion of calendars despite what he sees in my taunting claims.
    I have a sneaking suspicion that ancient oracles were also places where
calendars developed, and they still are as in the case of the Vatican.
Besides that if the perfect calendar had been discovered then this list
would not exist.

Charles

> From: Lance Latham <[hidden email]>
> Reply-To: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> <[hidden email]>
> Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2005 09:14:51 -0800
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: calendars and board games
>
>
> Lance replies:
> The question that I am raising here is not whether
> certain games can have calendrical associations forced
> upon them after the fact, but whether the games
> themselves have origins in calendric knowledge.
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Re: calendars and board games

Lance Latham
In reply to this post by VictorEngel
RE:

> Looks vaguely like Chutes and Ladders. Is that also
> calendrical?

Lance replies:
Victor, the argument has been made that 'Chutes and
Ladders' is a descendant. Even if that were true, I'm
not sure that means that the game is calendric. It
might mean that some calendric interpretation could be
forced on it after the fact, but then I could probably
do the same for, say, the wiring diagram for my water
heater.

I also encounterd references to a 'Viking' board game
called 'Halatafl', which is described as similar to
'Fox and Geese' and a possible progenitor. In cases
where games are being marketed, however, one must be
careful to research before accepting claims of
authenticity, rules, etc.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





               
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Re: calendars and board games

Lance Latham
In reply to this post by VictorEngel
RE:

> I tried following that link, but it didn't work. I
> found another site online
> that had the rules. They remind me of another board
> game we used to play
> called "Mensch ?rgere Dich nicht" which is very
> similar to Parcheesi and
> Aggravation.

Lance replies:
The important point to remember here is that the
original rules are NOT known for any of the Egyptian
games that I mentioned. In the case of senet, they
appear to have been so well known in ancient Egypt
that no one thought to write them down. If a
'Hoyle-amun' ever lived in Egypt, it appears that his
works have been lost to posterity.

Several workers have proposed rules for senet. As I
understand it, the proposals are usually based on a
logical analysis of the board, reference to Egyptian
texts, recourse to paintings on tomb walls that depict
the game, and reference to rules of extant board games
thought to be descended from the one in question.

As an example of the latter, I found several
references to a game still played by the Jewish
community in Cochin (India) which is thought to be a
variant of 'aseb'.

An additional complication, for senet at least, is the
possibility that the game became a religious metaphor
for the afterlife, and was played on multiple levels.
That might have led to rule changes. The closest
modern analogy that comes to mind is the evolution of
playing cards, with Tarot becoming a divination tool.

Any modern statement of the rules, however, is some
amalgam of the above, plus a sizeable dollop of
guesswork.

Returning again to the original topic, the question is
whether the board games were originally conceived to
reflect, or model, calendric situations. That is, if
the 'Game of 58' is structurally designed as a race
with 2 tracks of 29 holes, can one make a cogent
argument that the game is based on, or derived from, a
peg scheme that marked days in a lunation? If senet is
designed as a race with a single track of 30 squares,
with a countdown scheme of 3, 2, and 1 in the last
squares, can one argue that the game is based on some
representation of a lunation?

More to the point, the question is not whether one
'can' make such an argument, the answer obviously
being in the affirmative, but rather (1) does the game
structure COMPEL such an interpretation and (2) what
is the historical timing of a calendric interpretation
of the game?

Piccione, for example, argues that a calendric
interpretation was not given to senet until very late,
in Greco-Roman times. That seems wrong to me, since
the game STRUCTURE, even on the earliest known boards,
has 30 positions and a count-down numeral system in
the last squares. The 30th square itself is not
numbered, and often given a different color,
indicating to me that the game may have been based on
some scheme in which some dithering between 29 and 30
was a factor. That is, a lunation. In my current state
of infinite wisdom, I would detach the calendric
association from the end of senet's history, and move
it to the beginning.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





               
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Re: calendars and board games

Vladimir Pakhomov
In reply to this post by VictorEngel
Hello Victor,

> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Engel,Victor
> Sent: Friday, December 02, 2005 1:47 AM
> ...
> > I have the computer game "Mehen".
> > http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/PSNeeley/Mehen.htm
> > You will find the game rules there.
>
> I tried following that link, but it didn't work.
I send you this page (see the attachment "Mehen.htm).
Steve Neeley wrote to me in 1999: "I've based this game largely on ideas and
background gained from reading Tim Kendall's paper "Mehen: The Ancient
Egyptian Game of the Serpent".

* Timothy Kendall of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

I have the big archive about ancient games.

Best regards,

Vladimir Pakhomov
http://pakhomov.com/

Mehen.htm (12K) Download Attachment
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Re: calendars and board games

Victor Engel
That looks essentially the same as another website I found:

http://www.xmission.com/~psneeley/Shareware/Mehen.htm

Vladimir Pakhomov wrote:

> Hello Victor,
>
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
>>[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Engel,Victor
>>Sent: Friday, December 02, 2005 1:47 AM
>>...
>>
>>>I have the computer game "Mehen".
>>>http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/PSNeeley/Mehen.htm
>>>You will find the game rules there.
>>
>>I tried following that link, but it didn't work.
>
>
> I send you this page (see the attachment "Mehen.htm).
> Steve Neeley wrote to me in 1999: "I've based this game largely on ideas and
> background gained from reading Tim Kendall's paper "Mehen: The Ancient
> Egyptian Game of the Serpent".
>
> * Timothy Kendall of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
>
> I have the big archive about ancient games.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Vladimir Pakhomov
> http://pakhomov.com/
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Re: calendars and board games

Lance Latham
RE:

> That looks essentially the same as another website I
> found:
>
>
http://www.xmission.com/~psneeley/Shareware/Mehen.htm

Lance replies:
The site that Vladimir cited the first time may have
been an error. The one immediately above is
functional, and I suspect is the intended one.

The site refers to a software game based on a
concocted set of rules. I have not accumulated any
books or papers on this subject yet; but may have a
better idea of how reliable these reconstructions are
in another month or so.

The 'Tim Kendall' to which Vladimir refers is an
acknowledged authority on ancient Egyptian games. The
literature on ancient Egyptian board games is
relatively small; the literature on board games in
general is substantially larger.

Other acknowledged authorities are Putsch, Piccione,
Ball and Murray. Anyone interested in this topic can
easily consult Piccione's pages for a good
bibliography, so it seems wasteful to supply one here.

Perhaps Vladimir will supply some concrete information
on the topic of the relation of board games to
calendric knowledge.

-Lance


Lance Latham
[hidden email]
Phone:    (518) 274-0570
Address: 78 Hudson Avenue/1st Floor, Green Island, NY 12183
 





               
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Re: calendars and board games

Vladimir Pakhomov
Hello Lance,

> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lance Latham
> Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 3:04 AM
> ...
> > That looks essentially the same as another website I
> > found:
> > http://www.xmission.com/~psneeley/Shareware/Mehen.htm
>
> Lance replies:
> The site that Vladimir cited the first time may have
> been an error. The one immediately above is
> functional, and I suspect is the intended one.

Yes, these webpages are identical. Thank you, Victor Engel.
 
> Perhaps Vladimir will supply some concrete information
> on the topic of the relation of board games to
> calendric knowledge.

You will find concrete information in my book. I can gift the Russian
edition of the book to you (the first and second part of the book only). I
have one copy now.

The complete English edition of the book (four parts) is available on a site
of publisher.
http://www.midi-ebooks.com/pakhomov.html
"The Mystery of the Calendar - The Message to the Unborn"
ISBN 0-9580150-1-5
Publisher: Xerostar Holdings, Australia.

Inform me if you can read the Russian text.

Best regards,

Vladimir Pakhomov
http://pakhomov.com/