Trying out an invented calendar

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Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018

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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Peter Meyer
Karl said:

> The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of
> naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding
> [scil. preceded] by a week of month name.
> [And today is]
> Friday E August 2018
> Friday Epsilon August 2018

So Karl needs five different letters, none of which resemble numerals,
and an anagram of those letters which form a word which is easy to
remember.  I suggest ALERT.  Unless I am mistaken, then the
week-of-month is the position of the letter in the word, e.g. Saturday
A September 2018.

Karl could name his new calendar "The Alert Calendar".

Regards,
Peter Meyer
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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Peter Meyer
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com


I said:

> Unless I am mistaken, then the week-of-month is the position of the
> letter in the word,
> e.g. Saturday A September 2018.

I forgot to mention that the equivalent Gregorian date is
Saturday, September 1, 2018 (a significant 79th anniversary).

The attached ISO month image is from the program described
at https://www.hermetic.ch/edc/edc.htm

Regards,
Peter Meyer

ISO-month.JPG (98K) Download Attachment
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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Peter Meyer
Dear Peter and Calendar People

Thank you Peter for your suggestion and correcting my text.

I don't fancy ALERT which is the opposite of an alternative RELAX (and X is the eXtra week in the long months).

While yesterday (in ABCDE) was
Friday E August 2018
Today is
Saturday E August 2018
because it also occurs in ISO week 35, which is always E August in this calendar.
The month of September in the Week & Month calendar begins on Monday, which will be
Monday A September 2018 (= Gregorian Monday, 3 September 2018)

Karl

Saturday E August 2018
PS: My local weather is making feel like August this weekend.
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 01/09/2018 - 07:33 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Karl said:

> The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of
> naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding
> [scil. preceded] by a week of month name.
> [And today is]
> Friday E August 2018
> Friday Epsilon August 2018

So Karl needs five different letters, none of which resemble numerals,
and an anagram of those letters which form a word which is easy to
remember.  I suggest ALERT.  Unless I am mistaken, then the
week-of-month is the position of the letter in the word, e.g. Saturday
A September 2018.

Karl could name his new calendar "The Alert Calendar".

Regards,
Peter Meyer
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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Peter Meyer
Dear Peter and Calendar People

The Week & Month calendar September consists of the middle 4 of the 6 weeks displayed in the attachment. The attachment also shows that October begins on the same day in both the Gregorian and Week & Month calendars this year.

Karl

Saturday E August 2018

----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 01/09/2018 - 07:50 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar



I said:

> Unless I am mistaken, then the week-of-month is the position of the
> letter in the word,
> e.g. Saturday A September 2018.

I forgot to mention that the equivalent Gregorian date is
Saturday, September 1, 2018 (a significant 79th anniversary).

The attached ISO month image is from the program described
at https://www.hermetic.ch/edc/edc.htm

Regards,
Peter Meyer
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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Victor Engel
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Karl,

That is not exactly right. They used both B and H. B was used for B flat, and H for B natural. Hence, J.S. Bach was able to compose a piece using his own name as a motif. That would not be the case if they simply substituted H for B.


Victor

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 4:23 AM, K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018


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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018

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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Ryan Provost-2

I would also suggest use roman numerals for months alongside letter numbering and playing card calendar for weeks ie Saturday E, Clubs II, 2018 for today (2018-09-02 Sat [Gregorian solar]) (as per month pattern 4x5x4 from symmetry454).

Format would be in the following:

DDDD, W, QQQ M, YYYY

QQQ: Spades/Diamonds/Clubs/Hearts (Joker is omitted)

M: I, II, III (Roman numerals of 1-3)

W: A,B,C,D,E (or I suggest naming after Greek letter)

DDDD: Weekday (Monday-Sunday)

YYYY: Year (2018)

In the case for a leap week, it would count as _____ E, Hearts III, ---- rather than Joker

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 6:58:48 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Trying out an invented calendar
 

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018

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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Walter J Ziobro
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018



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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

sparkielee
Dear Karl and Calendar People,

Happy Nine of Hearts Sunday.

I found the information about the Germans referring to B natural as H and the "Bach Motif" interesting. Bach is one of my favorite composers-and I loved it when our church organist played Bach before and after Mass. I even had a ringtone on my cell phone that sounded like one of his pieces.

I posted this info about the Bach Motif in kind of an all purpose group I started on Facebook.

Paula

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018



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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com


On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

That idea was suggested during the '60s, in a song called "Deck of Cards", in which someone narrates that he was a soldier caught with a deck of cards, and explained all of the uses of a deck of cards.


 

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Need for what? Months don't tell the time of year any better than week-numbers.  Payments? Just pay rent on weeks divisible by 4.

Michael Ossipoff

 

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018



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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com
Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018



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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Yes the calendar does need an extra piece of information to form a date, but these are smaller pieces of information (measured by Shannon entropy). No need to remember a number between 1-31 or 1-53.

I consider the more frequent (but no greater) variation of months worthwhile for the convenience of having all months begin on the same day of week and subdividing the months into weeks. Irv address some of the issues arising from this at
http://individual.utoronto.ca/kalendis/Symmetry454-Calendar-FAQs.pdf page 16.

Karl

Monday A September 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 18:32 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018





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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Michael Ossipoff


On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 8:02 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Yes the calendar does need an extra piece of information to form a date, but these are smaller pieces of information (measured by Shannon entropy). No need to remember a number between 1-31 or 1-53.

But the WeekDate system can also be regarded as a 3-part date: The 10-week digit, the 1 week digit, and the day of the week.

.

How does it compare with the calendar that you propose? Compare it by these 2 standards:

.

[u]Number of values that each variable can take:[/u]

.

With your calendar, the months variable takes 12 values, the weeks variable takes 4 or 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 12.


(Of course you could also say that, for the month, there are really 2 variables: The month 10s digit and the months digit. But that's more, unnecessarily-many, variables to deal with in the date.)

.

With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10.

.

Your calendar has a larger max number of values for a variable.   ...or else it has more variables.

.

[u]Length of time during which a unit doesn’t change:[u]

.

With your calendar, the month stays the same for 4 or 5 weeks. With WeekDate, the 10s digit stays the same for 10 weeks.   …making the current value of the largest time unit more familiar to people, because it stays the same for longer.

.

Of course with both calendars the week stays the same for 7 days.

.

The WeekDate year-structure system is the elegant minimal year-structure system, and is easier than your calendar by the above-discussed standards.

.

Michael Ossipoff

 


 

I consider the more frequent (but no greater) variation of months worthwhile for the convenience of having all months begin on the same day of week and subdividing the months into weeks. Irv address some of the issues arising from this at

Karl

Monday A September 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 18:32 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018





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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Michael Ossipoff

The trouble with a mailling-list, as opposed to a website-forum, is that you can't edit a post to correct an error: I'd like to correct this one:

I said:

"With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10."

Of course actually the week 10s digit only takes 5 values, while the weeks digit can take any of 10 values.

But 10 is still better than 12.  ...or WeekDate's fewer variables is better.

Michael Ossipoff






On Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 11:47 AM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 8:02 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Yes the calendar does need an extra piece of information to form a date, but these are smaller pieces of information (measured by Shannon entropy). No need to remember a number between 1-31 or 1-53.

But the WeekDate system can also be regarded as a 3-part date: The 10-week digit, the 1 week digit, and the day of the week.

.

How does it compare with the calendar that you propose? Compare it by these 2 standards:

.

[u]Number of values that each variable can take:[/u]

.

With your calendar, the months variable takes 12 values, the weeks variable takes 4 or 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 12.


(Of course you could also say that, for the month, there are really 2 variables: The month 10s digit and the months digit. But that's more, unnecessarily-many, variables to deal with in the date.)

.

With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10.

.

Your calendar has a larger max number of values for a variable.   ...or else it has more variables.

.

[u]Length of time during which a unit doesn’t change:[u]

.

With your calendar, the month stays the same for 4 or 5 weeks. With WeekDate, the 10s digit stays the same for 10 weeks.   …making the current value of the largest time unit more familiar to people, because it stays the same for longer.

.

Of course with both calendars the week stays the same for 7 days.

.

The WeekDate year-structure system is the elegant minimal year-structure system, and is easier than your calendar by the above-discussed standards.

.

Michael Ossipoff

 


 

I consider the more frequent (but no greater) variation of months worthwhile for the convenience of having all months begin on the same day of week and subdividing the months into weeks. Irv address some of the issues arising from this at

Karl

Monday A September 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 18:32 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018





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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Michael and Calendar People

MICHAEL SAID: 
"With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10."

KARL REPLIES:
Actually the 10s digit takes six values including zero or blank.
If the two digits of the week number are taken separately then we'd have six divisions of the year the first has 9 weeks, the 2nd to 5th have 10 weeks each and the 6th has 3 or 4 weeks.

Karl

Thursday A September 2018

----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 05/09/2018 - 16:51 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Cc : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar


The trouble with a mailling-list, as opposed to a website-forum, is that you can't edit a post to correct an error: I'd like to correct this one:

I said:

"With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10."

Of course actually the week 10s digit only takes 5 values, while the weeks digit can take any of 10 values.

But 10 is still better than 12.  ...or WeekDate's fewer variables is better.

Michael Ossipoff






On Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 11:47 AM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 8:02 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Yes the calendar does need an extra piece of information to form a date, but these are smaller pieces of information (measured by Shannon entropy). No need to remember a number between 1-31 or 1-53.

But the WeekDate system can also be regarded as a 3-part date: The 10-week digit, the 1 week digit, and the day of the week.

.

How does it compare with the calendar that you propose? Compare it by these 2 standards:

.

[u]Number of values that each variable can take:[/u]

.

With your calendar, the months variable takes 12 values, the weeks variable takes 4 or 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 12.


(Of course you could also say that, for the month, there are really 2 variables: The month 10s digit and the months digit. But that's more, unnecessarily-many, variables to deal with in the date.)

.

With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10.

.

Your calendar has a larger max number of values for a variable.   ...or else it has more variables.

.

[u]Length of time during which a unit doesn’t change:[u]

.

With your calendar, the month stays the same for 4 or 5 weeks. With WeekDate, the 10s digit stays the same for 10 weeks.   …making the current value of the largest time unit more familiar to people, because it stays the same for longer.

.

Of course with both calendars the week stays the same for 7 days.

.

The WeekDate year-structure system is the elegant minimal year-structure system, and is easier than your calendar by the above-discussed standards.

.

Michael Ossipoff

 


 

I consider the more frequent (but no greater) variation of months worthwhile for the convenience of having all months begin on the same day of week and subdividing the months into weeks. Irv address some of the issues arising from this at

Karl

Monday A September 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 18:32 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018







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Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Michael Ossipoff

Karl--

True, I forgot the 0 in the weeks-10s digit. But that doesn't change the conclusions that I posted.

Michael Ossipoff

On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 6:08 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Michael and Calendar People

MICHAEL SAID: 
"With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10."

KARL REPLIES:
Actually the 10s digit takes six values including zero or blank.
If the two digits of the week number are taken separately then we'd have six divisions of the year the first has 9 weeks, the 2nd to 5th have 10 weeks each and the 6th has 3 or 4 weeks.

Karl

Thursday A September 2018

----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 05/09/2018 - 16:51 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Cc : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar


The trouble with a mailling-list, as opposed to a website-forum, is that you can't edit a post to correct an error: I'd like to correct this one:

I said:

"With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10."

Of course actually the week 10s digit only takes 5 values, while the weeks digit can take any of 10 values.

But 10 is still better than 12.  ...or WeekDate's fewer variables is better.

Michael Ossipoff






On Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 11:47 AM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 8:02 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Yes the calendar does need an extra piece of information to form a date, but these are smaller pieces of information (measured by Shannon entropy). No need to remember a number between 1-31 or 1-53.

But the WeekDate system can also be regarded as a 3-part date: The 10-week digit, the 1 week digit, and the day of the week.

.

How does it compare with the calendar that you propose? Compare it by these 2 standards:

.

[u]Number of values that each variable can take:[/u]

.

With your calendar, the months variable takes 12 values, the weeks variable takes 4 or 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 12.


(Of course you could also say that, for the month, there are really 2 variables: The month 10s digit and the months digit. But that's more, unnecessarily-many, variables to deal with in the date.)

.

With the WeekDate system, the 10s digit takes 10 values, and the weeks digit takes 5 values, and the day of the week takes 7 values. The largest of those numbers is 10.

.

Your calendar has a larger max number of values for a variable.   ...or else it has more variables.

.

[u]Length of time during which a unit doesn’t change:[u]

.

With your calendar, the month stays the same for 4 or 5 weeks. With WeekDate, the 10s digit stays the same for 10 weeks.   …making the current value of the largest time unit more familiar to people, because it stays the same for longer.

.

Of course with both calendars the week stays the same for 7 days.

.

The WeekDate year-structure system is the elegant minimal year-structure system, and is easier than your calendar by the above-discussed standards.

.

Michael Ossipoff

 


 

I consider the more frequent (but no greater) variation of months worthwhile for the convenience of having all months begin on the same day of week and subdividing the months into weeks. Irv address some of the issues arising from this at

Karl

Monday A September 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 18:32 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Besides, your calendar requires 3 pieces of information to tell the date. A WeekDate system (a system that tells the week number and the day of the week) needs only 2 pieces of information.

Yes, if you're going to have months, then it's probably easier to give month, week-of-month, and day-of-week, than to give month, day-of-month, and day-of-week.  But that comes at the cost of having months consist of a whole number of weeks, and having either drastically unequal month-lengths (4,5,4) or else 13 months.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 7:27 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

I considered this years ago in 
https://hermetic.ch/cal_stud/palmen/playcard.htm but with the suits in alphabetical order (in English), which is also in the order of ranking in Bridge from low to high. 
Today would be Sunday Nine of Hearts 2018.

However more recently I felt months were needed hence the Week & Month Calendar

Karl

Sunday E August 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 02/09/2018 - 11:58 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Trying out an invented calendar

I have given this matter some thought and I think something You might consider is combining ISO weeks with the playing card calendar to create an ISO like quarter-weeks system The first week of the first quarter would be the first week of the ISO year There would be 13 weeks in every quarter, except the last which would have 14. Each week would be identified by a card suit for each quarter and a number for each week:

e.g:

W01-W13 = Spades01-Spades 13
W14-W26 =Diamonds01-Diamonds13
W27-W39= Clubs01-Clubs13
W40-W52= Hearts01-Hearts13
W53= Joker

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, August 31, 2018 K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People

For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented. You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of my E-mails to this list.

I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that calendar for example:

Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776 (4th day of July)

During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.

The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding by a week of month name.

Karl

Friday E August 2018
Friday Epsilon August 2018







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13519.08.15 - Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by k.palmen@btinternet.com
15 Scorpio♏ 13519 UCC

Dear Karl and Co

As we're now in the middle of Scorpio♏ I can wish you all "Happy Mid
Season! (Samhain)"

I was interested to read your email about your experiences with the
calendar you created, as I too have been living by a calendar that I
invented , for over 6 and a half years.

I agree that it's important to "suck it and see" yourself if you are
proposing it to be used by others.

Since I launched it at New Year 13513 (2012 Gregorian) I've been using
the UCC (Universal Celestial Calendar) and by now it really is second
nature. I use the dates of the UCC for everything and convert back to
Gregorian dates when I have to interact with the system. Like you I put
my date on all correspondance and social media and I agree that this is
also an important thing to do.

Adopting this approach has really kind of 'rewired' my brain, releasing
me from the conditioning and behavioural control of the Gregorian
calendar (especially the seven day week and its illusion of weekends and
weekdays) and put me back in synch with the natural seasonal cycles of
the year.

I put the 3 months of each season up on the wall (see pic example) and
do a season plan & review at each equinox/solstice when I replace them
with the next three. As the calendar has a special intercalary day for
each of these astronomical events these are the perfect days to
undertake this seasonal activity.

For converting dates I have a Date Converter and a "Calendar Clock" on
the UCC website which I find really brings the thing to life. You can
try these via the links at the top of the UCC home page:

http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/

Please let me know what you think

The calendar clock, although still in development, can be animated to
show how the cycles work.

There are also full year calendars and a year planner, all with
Gregorian dates appended to each day.

I originally designed the UCC as a purely number based calendar, but
then realised it aligned very closely with the Tropical Zodiac and so
appended the names of the Zodiac months.

And the calendar also celebrates all 8 "Fire Festivals" of the ancient
"Eight Fold Year", from Ostara at the Aries♈Equinox to Imbolc in mid
Aquarius♒ under Zodiac names. So I can now also wish you all an
enjoyable rest of Quarter 3, Autumn if you're in the Northern Hemisphere
(Spring in the South), and look forward to Quarter 4 (Winter/Summer)

Happy calendrics

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

On 8/31/18 10:23 AM, K PALMEN wrote:

> Dear Calendar People
>
> For just over 3 months, I've been trying out a calendar I invented.
> You have seen me put dates from this calendar in the footer of most of
> my E-mails to this list.
>
> I think it is a good idea for anyone who proposes a calendar to try
> using it themself and also to work out some remote dates in that
> calendar for example:
>
> Gregorian: Friday, 15 October 1582 = Week & Month: Friday B October 1582
> Gregorian: Thursday, 4 July 1776 = Week & Month: Thursday A July 1776
> (4th day of July)
>
> During this trial, I have not been happy with week B, because it B
> looks like 8. I've heard that German's used H instead of B for the
> musical note between A & C, so could use H instead of B. May may
> consider other names for the week of month, such as Greek letters
> Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and sometimes Epsilon.
>
> The Week and Month Calendar is effectively an alternative way of
> naming ISO weeks. Each week name consists of the month name preceding
> by a week of month name.
>
> Karl
>
> Friday E August 2018
> Friday Epsilon August 2018
>

UCC.Season on the wall.2080x1560.jpg (1M) Download Attachment
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Re: 13519.08.15 - Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Amos Shapir-2
Hi Litmus and calendar people,

It is not clear from the explanation what is the leap year rule, and also how the epoch was determined.
Also note that the earth's axis precession's period is closer to 26,000 years, so why use 24,000?

On Sun, Nov 4, 2018 at 8:15 PM Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
15 Scorpio♏ 13519 UCC

Dear Karl and Co

As we're now in the middle of Scorpio♏ I can wish you all "Happy Mid
Season! (Samhain)"

I was interested to read your email about your experiences with the
calendar you created, as I too have been living by a calendar that I
invented , for over 6 and a half years.

I agree that it's important to "suck it and see" yourself if you are
proposing it to be used by others.

Since I launched it at New Year 13513 (2012 Gregorian) I've been using
the UCC (Universal Celestial Calendar) and by now it really is second
nature. I use the dates of the UCC for everything and convert back to
Gregorian dates when I have to interact with the system. Like you I put
my date on all correspondance and social media and I agree that this is
also an important thing to do.

Adopting this approach has really kind of 'rewired' my brain, releasing
me from the conditioning and behavioural control of the Gregorian
calendar (especially the seven day week and its illusion of weekends and
weekdays) and put me back in synch with the natural seasonal cycles of
the year.

I put the 3 months of each season up on the wall (see pic example) and
do a season plan & review at each equinox/solstice when I replace them
with the next three. As the calendar has a special intercalary day for
each of these astronomical events these are the perfect days to
undertake this seasonal activity.

For converting dates I have a Date Converter and a "Calendar Clock" on
the UCC website which I find really brings the thing to life. You can
try these via the links at the top of the UCC home page:

http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/

Please let me know what you think

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Re: 13519.08.15 - Re: Trying out an invented calendar

Irv Bromberg

I agree. It seems a lot like the Enoch calendar, which also was vague about the leap rule!


Also, Litmus claims that all of the equinoxes and solstices are "aligned" with their respective quarter years, but that is impossible because those quarter years are equal in length yet the seasons are always very unequal in length due to the eccentricity of Earth's orbit. Also, he claims that it is a "perpetual" calendar, yet it seems that various days are outside of the traditional 7-day week.


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Amos Shapir <[hidden email]>
Sent: Monday, November 5, 2018 2:59:59 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 13519.08.15 - Re: Trying out an invented calendar
 
Hi Litmus and calendar people,

It is not clear from the explanation what is the leap year rule, and also how the epoch was determined.
Also note that the earth's axis precession's period is closer to 26,000 years, so why use 24,000?

On Sun, Nov 4, 2018 at 8:15 PM Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
15 Scorpio♏ 13519 UCC

Dear Karl and Co

As we're now in the middle of Scorpio♏ I can wish you all "Happy Mid
Season! (Samhain)"

I was interested to read your email about your experiences with the
calendar you created, as I too have been living by a calendar that I
invented , for over 6 and a half years.

I agree that it's important to "suck it and see" yourself if you are
proposing it to be used by others.

Since I launched it at New Year 13513 (2012 Gregorian) I've been using
the UCC (Universal Celestial Calendar) and by now it really is second
nature. I use the dates of the UCC for everything and convert back to
Gregorian dates when I have to interact with the system. Like you I put
my date on all correspondance and social media and I agree that this is
also an important thing to do.

Adopting this approach has really kind of 'rewired' my brain, releasing
me from the conditioning and behavioural control of the Gregorian
calendar (especially the seven day week and its illusion of weekends and
weekdays) and put me back in synch with the natural seasonal cycles of
the year.

I put the 3 months of each season up on the wall (see pic example) and
do a season plan & review at each equinox/solstice when I replace them
with the next three. As the calendar has a special intercalary day for
each of these astronomical events these are the perfect days to
undertake this seasonal activity.

For converting dates I have a Date Converter and a "Calendar Clock" on
the UCC website which I find really brings the thing to life. You can
try these via the links at the top of the UCC home page:

http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/

Please let me know what you think

1234