The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

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The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Vladimir Pakhomov-2

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Karl Palmen

Dear Rob, Vladimir & Calendar People

 

One curiosity is the choice of Dominical letter C to start the cycle (after the cross). This corresponds to a year starting Friday straight after a leap year.

I’d expect B at the start, which began on Saturday as would year 1 of the proleptic Julian Calendar.

 

The start year of the cycle corresponds to AD 17, 45, 73, 101, 129, 157, 185, 213, 241, 269, 297, 325, … .

 

May be the cycle was chosen to start from AD 325, which is the year of the Council of Nicea.

Karl

 

16(01(11

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 11 September 2016 12:10
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

That seems sensible.

 

Another choice would be an epoch near 1555, but in this case that would be 1557 which does not seem likely.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:34
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob, Vladimir & Calendar People

 

One curiosity is the choice of Dominical letter C to start the cycle (after the cross). This corresponds to a year starting Friday straight after a leap year.

I’d expect B at the start, which began on Saturday as would year 1 of the proleptic Julian Calendar.

 

The start year of the cycle corresponds to AD 17, 45, 73, 101, 129, 157, 185, 213, 241, 269, 297, 325, … .

 

May be the cycle was chosen to start from AD 325, which is the year of the Council of Nicea.

 

Karl

 

16(01(11

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 11 September 2016 12:10
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Karl Palmen

Dear Rob & Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 12 September 2016 12:46
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

That seems sensible.

 

Another choice would be an epoch near 1555, but in this case that would be 1557 which does not seem likely.

 

KARL REPLIES: Could be 1501.

 

Karl

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:34
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob, Vladimir & Calendar People

 

One curiosity is the choice of Dominical letter C to start the cycle (after the cross). This corresponds to a year starting Friday straight after a leap year.

I’d expect B at the start, which began on Saturday as would year 1 of the proleptic Julian Calendar.

 

The start year of the cycle corresponds to AD 17, 45, 73, 101, 129, 157, 185, 213, 241, 269, 297, 325, … .

 

May be the cycle was chosen to start from AD 325, which is the year of the Council of Nicea.

 

Karl

 

16(01(11

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 11 September 2016 12:10
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

First year of the 16th century – for me that will surely work.

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:49
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob & Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 12 September 2016 12:46
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

That seems sensible.

 

Another choice would be an epoch near 1555, but in this case that would be 1557 which does not seem likely.

 

KARL REPLIES: Could be 1501.

 

Karl

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:34
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob, Vladimir & Calendar People

 

One curiosity is the choice of Dominical letter C to start the cycle (after the cross). This corresponds to a year starting Friday straight after a leap year.

I’d expect B at the start, which began on Saturday as would year 1 of the proleptic Julian Calendar.

 

The start year of the cycle corresponds to AD 17, 45, 73, 101, 129, 157, 185, 213, 241, 269, 297, 325, … .

 

May be the cycle was chosen to start from AD 325, which is the year of the Council of Nicea.

 

Karl

 

16(01(11

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 11 September 2016 12:10
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

Karl Palmen

Dear Rob & Calendar People

 

This practice of starting from the first year of the century, hints that a correction of Julian calendar that takes places between centuries would be desired, rather than a less jittery option such as the 33-year cycle, whose 231-year solar cycle has no long lasting sub-cycle for such a chart.

 

The longest lasting sub-cycle of this 231-year cycle is 17 years: consisting of the last 17 years of one 33-year cycle and the first 17 years of the next 33-year cycle plus three adjacent common years totalling 37 years. A 17-year chart can be constructed by taking a 28-year chart and cutting out the last 11 years, to truncate it to 17 years. In the example shown, the 17th year is D, which can be followed by the 1st year C.

 

Karl

 

16(01(12

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 12 September 2016 12:53
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

First year of the 16th century – for me that will surely work.

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:49
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob & Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 12 September 2016 12:46
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

That seems sensible.

 

Another choice would be an epoch near 1555, but in this case that would be 1557 which does not seem likely.

 

KARL REPLIES: Could be 1501.

 

Karl

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: maandag 12 september 2016 13:34
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

Dear Rob, Vladimir & Calendar People

 

One curiosity is the choice of Dominical letter C to start the cycle (after the cross). This corresponds to a year starting Friday straight after a leap year.

I’d expect B at the start, which began on Saturday as would year 1 of the proleptic Julian Calendar.

 

The start year of the cycle corresponds to AD 17, 45, 73, 101, 129, 157, 185, 213, 241, 269, 297, 325, … .

 

May be the cycle was chosen to start from AD 325, which is the year of the Council of Nicea.

 

Karl

 

16(01(11

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 11 September 2016 12:10
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

What you are seeing is a fairly standard representation of the Sunday letters in the 28-year solar cycle.

 

Nothing refers to the Chaldeans or the Star of Bethlehem.

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: zondag 11 september 2016 11:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

The picture from the first edition (1555) of Nostradamus.

 

 

I see the Perpetual calendar, Chaldean series, and Star of Magi.

I do not know what Nostradamus wrote about it.

What do you think about it?

 

Vladimir Pakhomov

 

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