The WeekDate calendar isn't more difficult to use.

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The WeekDate calendar isn't more difficult to use.

Michael Ossipoff
It was argued here that a WeekDate calendar would be more difficult because, with weeks in a year than there are days in a month, there would be more errors regarding which week it is.

But the day of the month changes every day, while the week of the year remains the same for a week. You'd have heard the week being named for the past week.

How do people guess the date when they don't know it? Maybe they know the day of the week, and, guessing which week it is, that gives them the date. Then it's necessary to guess the week. A person knows or feels that certain dates have been within the last few days, and that gives a good guess about which week it is, for the purpose of determining the date from the day of the week.

That guess of which week it is would be easier if the week were named whenever a date is stated, as would be done with a WeekDate calendar..

My main proposal has the 30,30,31 month system. But the fact that the ISO WeekDate system is already in wide international use amounts to precedent that no other alternative calendar has.

Someone at a website suggested that calendar-reform by international agreement from the top will never happen now, because of the expense of a changeover,. But he suggested that if ISO WeekDate's convenience increases its use by companies & government, then it could gradually start encroaching on Roman-Gregorian's civil use.

I don't know if that could someday happen, but WeekDate's wide use seems to suggest it as a possibility. Might the ISO WeekDate Calendar be the most feasible calendar reform, due to its already wide use, even though people seem to (so far) reject a calendar without months?

Michael Ossipoff







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Re: The WeekDate calendar isn't more difficult to use.

Michael Ossipoff
A few things that I left out:

Of course nowadays one can find out the date from a personal-computer, or any of various other electronic devices.

My grandparents had, on the wall, an old school-clock, a short-pendulum clock that used to be used in schools. It had a day-of-the-month dial &  hand.

But it seems to me that in the days before computers & cellphones, the usual thing, if there wasn't anyone nearby to ask, was to go out and look at the date on a newspaper front-page (visible without buying the paper).  ...or maybe get the date from a news broadcast,

But often people would, in those days, and still do, determine the date from the week and the day of the week. 

With WeekDate, when the day of the week is always stated whenever the date is stated, and when you've been hearing the current week-number for some days, the week and the day of the week would be less error prone than they now are, resulting in fewer missed guesses.

So that's one considerable convenience-advantage of WeekDate. Of course another is that no one would ever not know what day of the week a certain date is, because the day of the week is part of the date.

My reason for preferring 30,30,31 to WeekDate is just the fact that, throughout history, and throughout out lives, the time of year has been measured by the Roman months date. If a novel started out, "it was a warm day, for 37 Friday.",
it wouldn't be immediately obvious to us, who are used to the Roman months, what kind of a day that was, or what part of the year that was.

...unlike if someone said, "It was a warm day for September 15th."

That's probably a main reason why people I've spoken to don't like WeekDate.

But is it really very difficult to interpret the week-number seasonally?:

April, the first really spring month, starts after about a quarter of the year has elapsed. 90 days, in a common Roman-Gregorian year 91 days in a leapyear. So April starts on at least nearly the same day as week 14.

July & August are the hottest months (in the northern hemisphere), and July starts very nearly halfway through the year. In a Roman-Gregorian leapyear, July starts on the same day as week 27, when half of the year's 52 weeks have elapsed.

With July & August totaling about 9 weeks, then you could say that that hottest period runs from the beginning of week 27 to the beginning of week 36.

So if someone says, "Week 37", you know that's a bit after those 2 hottest months.

With spring beginning a quarter of the way though the year, and the hottest 2 months starting about halfway through the year, it isn't so difficult to seasonally interpret week-numbers.

And of course if the week number is close to 52 or 1, then that's close to the boundary of December & January, which are, in many places (especially away from a west coast) the coldest months of the year. When I lived in coastal California, the middle of winter (based on equal amounts of cold before & after) was usually around January 28, but there's less season lag when one isn't on a west coast.

So if it's around weeks 48 to 5, that's at least roughly the region of December & January.

Those landmarks, around the beginning of a year, a quarter, and a half of the year will make clear the time of year and the season

The correspondence between date and weather isn't exact enough to say that we must keep the months because of their seasonal meaning, when WeekDate gives a good season-indication too.

Michael Ossipoff.








On Wed, Jan 4, 2017 at 3:39 PM, Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
It was argued here that a WeekDate calendar would be more difficult because, with weeks in a year than there are days in a month, there would be more errors regarding which week it is.

But the day of the month changes every day, while the week of the year remains the same for a week. You'd have heard the week being named for the past week.

How do people guess the date when they don't know it? Maybe they know the day of the week, and, guessing which week it is, that gives them the date. Then it's necessary to guess the week. A person knows or feels that certain dates have been within the last few days, and that gives a good guess about which week it is, for the purpose of determining the date from the day of the week.

That guess of which week it is would be easier if the week were named whenever a date is stated, as would be done with a WeekDate calendar..

My main proposal has the 30,30,31 month system. But the fact that the ISO WeekDate system is already in wide international use amounts to precedent that no other alternative calendar has.

Someone at a website suggested that calendar-reform by international agreement from the top will never happen now, because of the expense of a changeover,. But he suggested that if ISO WeekDate's convenience increases its use by companies & government, then it could gradually start encroaching on Roman-Gregorian's civil use.

I don't know if that could someday happen, but WeekDate's wide use seems to suggest it as a possibility. Might the ISO WeekDate Calendar be the most feasible calendar reform, due to its already wide use, even though people seem to (so far) reject a calendar without months?

Michael Ossipoff