Stardates RE: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

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Stardates RE: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

Karl Palmen

Dear Victor, Christoph and Calendar People

 

This reminded me about how I would have allocated stardates in Star Trek or similar.

 

Each stardate would last approximately one earth day. If there were 26 episodes to a season, one could allocate 14 stardates to each episode, but I’d normally allocate 10, because such an allocation would be easier to remember and there would then be some spare stardates for episodes that required more than 10 stardates for their story.

 

A four-digit stardate would be sufficient for a 5-year mission and a five-digit stardate would be sufficient for a lifetime (assuming it has not been extended beyond 270 years). Longer stardates (of 6 or 7 digits) would be required to avoid a millennium-like bug. Stardates entered into a starship log could have four digits preceded by a mission number. The mission number could have a spare digit at the end that would be incremented in the event of full stardate ending in 0000 occurring during the mission.

 

Stardates could be spoken like we speak years. For example, 458010 would be spoken “forty-five eighty ten” and 458009 could be spoken , “forty-five eighty zero nine”  or  “forty-five eighty O nine” or “forty-five eighty noughty nine”.

 

Come to think about it; How many calendar people speak this year as “twenty seventeen”?

 

Karl

 

JDN 2,458,010

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 02 September 2017 16:20
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

 

I'm sure I've mentioned this before on this listserv, but I used to work with a software package whose date calculations had an epoch of Dec 31, 1967. The value was stored as an integer number of days since this epoch. Some programmers foolishly allocated 4 bytes to store the value. This was foolish not only because it forces an end date of compatibility, but also because the internal storage is a delimited storage model, so allocating a specific size for a field was superfluous. Storage on this system always used strings, and numbers were stored as base-10 representations of the numbers. Needless to say, there were many bugs in 1995 as a result. People using this software, based on the Pick operating system, had their Y2K issue nearly 5 years earlier than everyone else.

 

Victor

 

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 4:56 AM, Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:

This reminds me of the time I celebrated my 10000th day of life. I just recently turned 2000 weeks, but totally missed that opportunity. I'm thinking of developing an app or website to find such strange birthdays.

 

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Re: Stardates RE: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

Walter J Ziobro

Dear Karl and Calendar List

IMO the Indonesian Pawukon would be a good calendar to use in space It is based on whole days but has no connection to months or years which you don't need off of Earth We would need whole days because humans in space would still need diurnal perspective The system of. 210 days is based on primes 2x3x5x7 so it can be conveniently divided in work and rest periods in a lot of ways

The epoch for a cycle of Pawukons could be the earliest Julian Date that a Pawukon commences Given that today is JD 2458009.5 there have been 11704 Pawukons since the start of JDs So we are now in Julian Pawukon 11705 According to the Balinese Calendar today is Wednesday of week Kulantir, or day 25 of the current Pawukon This could be displayed as Julian Pawukon 11705:25

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Christoph and Calendar People

 

This reminded me about how I would have allocated stardates in Star Trek or similar.

 

Each stardate would last approximately one earth day. If there were 26 episodes to a season, one could allocate 14 stardates to each episode, but I’d normally allocate 10, because such an allocation would be easier to remember and there would then be some spare stardates for episodes that required more than 10 stardates for their story.

 

A four-digit stardate would be sufficient for a 5-year mission and a five-digit stardate would be sufficient for a lifetime (assuming it has not been extended beyond 270 years). Longer stardates (of 6 or 7 digits) would be required to avoid a millennium-like bug. Stardates entered into a starship log could have four digits preceded by a mission number. The mission number could have a spare digit at the end that would be incremented in the event of full stardate ending in 0000 occurring during the mission.

 

Stardates could be spoken like we speak years. For example, 458010 would be spoken “forty-five eighty ten” and 458009 could be spoken , “forty-five eighty zero nine”  or  “forty-five eighty O nine” or “forty-five eighty noughty nine”.

 

Come to think about it; How many calendar people speak this year as “twenty seventeen”?

 

Karl

 

JDN 2,458,010

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:CALNDR-L@...] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 02 September 2017 16:20
To: CALNDR-L@...
Subject: Re: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

 

I'm sure I've mentioned this before on this listserv, but I used to work with a software package whose date calculations had an epoch of Dec 31, 1967. The value was stored as an integer number of days since this epoch. Some programmers foolishly allocated 4 bytes to store the value. This was foolish not only because it forces an end date of compatibility, but also because the internal storage is a delimited storage model, so allocating a specific size for a field was superfluous. Storage on this system always used strings, and numbers were stored as base-10 representations of the numbers. Needless to say, there were many bugs in 1995 as a result. People using this software, based on the Pick operating system, had their Y2K issue nearly 5 years earlier than everyone else.

 

Victor

 

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 4:56 AM, Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:

This reminds me of the time I celebrated my 10000th day of life. I just recently turned 2000 weeks, but totally missed that opportunity. I'm thinking of developing an app or website to find such strange birthdays.

 

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Re: Stardates RE: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

Karl Palmen

Dear Walter and Calendar People

 

The 210-day Pawukon cycles could be grouped into 12s to form a 2520-day cycle of almost 7 years. Then all the sub-cycles up to 10 days can be regular.

11705:025 would then become 975:05:025 or 975:0865.

 

I check Walter’s result and find the first Pawukon started on JD 146 (a Sunday) to today would be 146 + 11704*210 + 24 = 2458010.

Every Pawukon would have a Friday 13th, they’d occur just slightly more frequently than in the Gregorian or Julian calendar.

 

For stardates, I was thinking of something purely decimal and the unit need not be an earth day, just something approximately equal to it. I then just took an example from today’s JDN.

 

Karl

 

From: Walter J Ziobro [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 13 September 2017 14:17
To: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS); [hidden email]
Subject: RE: Stardates RE: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

 

Dear Karl and Calendar List

IMO the Indonesian Pawukon would be a good calendar to use in space It is based on whole days but has no connection to months or years which you don't need off of Earth We would need whole days because humans in space would still need diurnal perspective The system of. 210 days is based on primes 2x3x5x7 so it can be conveniently divided in work and rest periods in a lot of ways

The epoch for a cycle of Pawukons could be the earliest Julian Date that a Pawukon commences Given that today is JD 2458009.5 there have been 11704 Pawukons since the start of JDs So we are now in Julian Pawukon 11705 According to the Balinese Calendar today is Wednesday of week Kulantir, or day 25 of the current Pawukon This could be displayed as Julian Pawukon 11705:25

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

 


On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Christoph and Calendar People

 

This reminded me about how I would have allocated stardates in Star Trek or similar.

 

Each stardate would last approximately one earth day. If there were 26 episodes to a season, one could allocate 14 stardates to each episode, but I’d normally allocate 10, because such an allocation would be easier to remember and there would then be some spare stardates for episodes that required more than 10 stardates for their story.

 

A four-digit stardate would be sufficient for a 5-year mission and a five-digit stardate would be sufficient for a lifetime (assuming it has not been extended beyond 270 years). Longer stardates (of 6 or 7 digits) would be required to avoid a millennium-like bug. Stardates entered into a starship log could have four digits preceded by a mission number. The mission number could have a spare digit at the end that would be incremented in the event of full stardate ending in 0000 occurring during the mission.

 

Stardates could be spoken like we speak years. For example, 458010 would be spoken “forty-five eighty ten” and 458009 could be spoken , “forty-five eighty zero nine”  or  “forty-five eighty O nine” or “forty-five eighty noughty nine”.

 

Come to think about it; How many calendar people speak this year as “twenty seventeen”?

 

Karl

 

JDN 2,458,010

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 02 September 2017 16:20
To: CALNDR-[hidden email]
Subject: Re: Happy Julian Kiloday on Sunday

 

I'm sure I've mentioned this before on this listserv, but I used to work with a software package whose date calculations had an epoch of Dec 31, 1967. The value was stored as an integer number of days since this epoch. Some programmers foolishly allocated 4 bytes to store the value. This was foolish not only because it forces an end date of compatibility, but also because the internal storage is a delimited storage model, so allocating a specific size for a field was superfluous. Storage on this system always used strings, and numbers were stored as base-10 representations of the numbers. Needless to say, there were many bugs in 1995 as a result. People using this software, based on the Pick operating system, had their Y2K issue nearly 5 years earlier than everyone else.

 

Victor

 

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 4:56 AM, Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:

This reminds me of the time I celebrated my 10000th day of life. I just recently turned 2000 weeks, but totally missed that opportunity. I'm thinking of developing an app or website to find such strange birthdays.