Seasonal Month-Names

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Seasonal Month-Names

Michael Ossipoff
 As much as I like the French-Republican Calendar's (FR) month-names, I use something a less specific, named 1) by solar declination; or 2) by already-existing season-names.

For greatest generality, I was first naming the seasons by solar declination, using the season-names South, Pre-Northward, Northward, North, Pre-Southward, Southward.

I like it because it's completely neutral and unbiased with respect to places north or south of the equator.

But people here expressed some resistance to change, in regards to season-names, and so I begain, instead using existing season-names, as follows:

The conventionally-named season (but with 2 additional seasons), preceded by an N or an S to denote whether that season-name is being given for places north or south of the equator.  i.e. :

N. Winter, N.Pre-Spring, N. Spring, N. Summer, N. Pre-Autumn, N. Autumn,

(...or similarly with "S" instead of "N")

That unambiguously tells the time of year, in a way that looks comfortably familiar to people. But, with it, a denoting of a season is unavoidably biased geographically.

So, to those who don't like "Soutthward3" as the name of the current season, I'd suggest that calendar-reform involves change.  Although, at least in the near-term, relative sameness doesn't provoke as much resistance, I'll remind you that the main purpose and goal of change isn't sameness.

Anyway, as I've said, 28&14  and, it seems to me, FR and UCC too, are for a hypothetical distant future when people (according to the fiction) will want a complete break with the past.   ...a complete break with the bad-old societal days.

At that future hypothetical and fictitious time, comfortable sameness won't count for anything. Therefore, then, the completely unbiased geograpical neutrality of "Southward3" (instead of N. Autumn3 would call for the use of "Southward3" instead.

But, due to objections here to "Southward3", I'll keep using "N. Autum3" as the name of this month in 28&14.

N. Autumn3 Week 1 Wednesday

Michael Ossipoff





, but there was a lot of resistance to that here.  So I switched to already-existing season-names.






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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Walter J Ziobro

Dear Michael et al

I have been thinking of internationalizing the Indian National Civic Calendar, which has nice seastonal divisions To accomdare this, I have developed generic month names, which you may find useful. Starting with the northward equinox the months would be

Boreal 1 - 30/31 days
Boreal 2- 31 days
Boreal 3 - 31 days
Boreal 4 - 31 days
Boreal 5 - 31 days
Boreal 6 - 31 days
Austral 1 - 30 days
Austral 2 - 30 days
Austral 3 - 30 days
Austral 4 - 30 days
Austral 5 - 30 days
Austral 6 - 30 days

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

 As much as I like the French-Republican Calendar's (FR) month-names, I use something a less specific, named 1) by solar declination; or 2) by already-existing season-names.

For greatest generality, I was first naming the seasons by solar declination, using the season-names South, Pre-Northward, Northward, North, Pre-Southward, Southward.

I like it because it's completely neutral and unbiased with respect to places north or south of the equator.

But people here expressed some resistance to change, in regards to season-names, and so I begain, instead using existing season-names, as follows:

The conventionally-named season (but with 2 additional seasons), preceded by an N or an S to denote whether that season-name is being given for places north or south of the equator.  i.e. :

N. Winter, N.Pre-Spring, N. Spring, N. Summer, N. Pre-Autumn, N. Autumn,

(...or similarly with "S" instead of "N")

That unambiguously tells the time of year, in a way that looks comfortably familiar to people. But, with it, a denoting of a season is unavoidably biased geographically.

So, to those who don't like "Soutthward3" as the name of the current season, I'd suggest that calendar-reform involves change.  Although, at least in the near-term, relative sameness doesn't provoke as much resistance, I'll remind you that the main purpose and goal of change isn't sameness.

Anyway, as I've said, 28&14  and, it seems to me, FR and UCC too, are for a hypothetical distant future when people (according to the fiction) will want a complete break with the past.   ...a complete break with the bad-old societal days.

At that future hypothetical and fictitious time, comfortable sameness won't count for anything. Therefore, then, the completely unbiased geograpical neutrality of "Southward3" (instead of N. Autumn3 would call for the use of "Southward3" instead.

But, due to objections here to "Southward3", I'll keep using "N. Autum3" as the name of this month in 28&14.

N. Autumn3 Week 1 Wednesday

Michael Ossipoff





, but there was a lot of resistance to that here.  So I switched to already-existing season-names.






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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Michael Ossipoff
Hi Walter--

(My apologies that, because I'm replying directly in e-mail, rather than in Word, it isn't possible for me to delete all of the text of the message that I'm replying to, and any previous conversation. My mailer doesn't allow deleting more than one small writing-screed of text at a time, and deleting a whole message or history of them would be unfeasibly time-consuming. Sorry.)

But during the transitional months, when transitioning between Boreal and Austral months, shouldn't the months be named accordingly, to indicate their transitionalness?   Like Australward1 & Australward2?

Also, I've been arguing that, most meaningfully, there's a time before Spring but after Winter, during which Spring is previewed a bit during othjerwise wintry weather.   ...and something similar before Autumn,  That's why designations of 6 seasons have been popular, and it's why i've been advocating such a seasonal month-system.

But it definitely makes sense to have shorter month-lengths during the north (Boreal) solar-declination period, due to the Earth's faster movement around the sun during that period.

Michael Ossipoff

On Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 12:16 PM Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Michael et al

I have been thinking of internationalizing the Indian National Civic Calendar, which has nice seastonal divisions To accomdare this, I have developed generic month names, which you may find useful. Starting with the northward equinox the months would be

Boreal 1 - 30/31 days
Boreal 2- 31 days
Boreal 3 - 31 days
Boreal 4 - 31 days
Boreal 5 - 31 days
Boreal 6 - 31 days
Austral 1 - 30 days
Austral 2 - 30 days
Austral 3 - 30 days
Austral 4 - 30 days
Austral 5 - 30 days
Austral 6 - 30 days

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 As much as I like the French-Republican Calendar's (FR) month-names, I use something a less specific, named 1) by solar declination; or 2) by already-existing season-names.

For greatest generality, I was first naming the seasons by solar declination, using the season-names South, Pre-Northward, Northward, North, Pre-Southward, Southward.

I like it because it's completely neutral and unbiased with respect to places north or south of the equator.

But people here expressed some resistance to change, in regards to season-names, and so I begain, instead using existing season-names, as follows:

The conventionally-named season (but with 2 additional seasons), preceded by an N or an S to denote whether that season-name is being given for places north or south of the equator.  i.e. :

N. Winter, N.Pre-Spring, N. Spring, N. Summer, N. Pre-Autumn, N. Autumn,

(...or similarly with "S" instead of "N")

That unambiguously tells the time of year, in a way that looks comfortably familiar to people. But, with it, a denoting of a season is unavoidably biased geographically.

So, to those who don't like "Soutthward3" as the name of the current season, I'd suggest that calendar-reform involves change.  Although, at least in the near-term, relative sameness doesn't provoke as much resistance, I'll remind you that the main purpose and goal of change isn't sameness.

Anyway, as I've said, 28&14  and, it seems to me, FR and UCC too, are for a hypothetical distant future when people (according to the fiction) will want a complete break with the past.   ...a complete break with the bad-old societal days.

At that future hypothetical and fictitious time, comfortable sameness won't count for anything. Therefore, then, the completely unbiased geograpical neutrality of "Southward3" (instead of N. Autumn3 would call for the use of "Southward3" instead.

But, due to objections here to "Southward3", I'll keep using "N. Autum3" as the name of this month in 28&14.

N. Autumn3 Week 1 Wednesday

Michael Ossipoff





, but there was a lot of resistance to that here.  So I switched to already-existing season-names.






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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff

Dear Michael et al

I try to keep it as simple as possible The 6 Boreal months are those during which the sun is north of the celestial equator; the 6 Austral months are those when the sun is south of the celestial equator. Its simple and unambiguous

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Walter--

(My apologies that, because I'm replying directly in e-mail, rather than in Word, it isn't possible for me to delete all of the text of the message that I'm replying to, and any previous conversation. My mailer doesn't allow deleting more than one small writing-screed of text at a time, and deleting a whole message or history of them would be unfeasibly time-consuming. Sorry.)

But during the transitional months, when transitioning between Boreal and Austral months, shouldn't the months be named accordingly, to indicate their transitionalness?   Like Australward1 & Australward2?

Also, I've been arguing that, most meaningfully, there's a time before Spring but after Winter, during which Spring is previewed a bit during othjerwise wintry weather.   ...and something similar before Autumn,  That's why designations of 6 seasons have been popular, and it's why i've been advocating such a seasonal month-system.

But it definitely makes sense to have shorter month-lengths during the north (Boreal) solar-declination period, due to the Earth's faster movement around the sun during that period.

Michael Ossipoff

On Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 12:16 PM Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Michael et al

I have been thinking of internationalizing the Indian National Civic Calendar, which has nice seastonal divisions To accomdare this, I have developed generic month names, which you may find useful. Starting with the northward equinox the months would be

Boreal 1 - 30/31 days
Boreal 2- 31 days
Boreal 3 - 31 days
Boreal 4 - 31 days
Boreal 5 - 31 days
Boreal 6 - 31 days
Austral 1 - 30 days
Austral 2 - 30 days
Austral 3 - 30 days
Austral 4 - 30 days
Austral 5 - 30 days
Austral 6 - 30 days

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 As much as I like the French-Republican Calendar's (FR) month-names, I use something a less specific, named 1) by solar declination; or 2) by already-existing season-names.

For greatest generality, I was first naming the seasons by solar declination, using the season-names South, Pre-Northward, Northward, North, Pre-Southward, Southward.

I like it because it's completely neutral and unbiased with respect to places north or south of the equator.

But people here expressed some resistance to change, in regards to season-names, and so I begain, instead using existing season-names, as follows:

The conventionally-named season (but with 2 additional seasons), preceded by an N or an S to denote whether that season-name is being given for places north or south of the equator.  i.e. :

N. Winter, N.Pre-Spring, N. Spring, N. Summer, N. Pre-Autumn, N. Autumn,

(...or similarly with "S" instead of "N")

That unambiguously tells the time of year, in a way that looks comfortably familiar to people. But, with it, a denoting of a season is unavoidably biased geographically.

So, to those who don't like "Soutthward3" as the name of the current season, I'd suggest that calendar-reform involves change.  Although, at least in the near-term, relative sameness doesn't provoke as much resistance, I'll remind you that the main purpose and goal of change isn't sameness.

Anyway, as I've said, 28&14  and, it seems to me, FR and UCC too, are for a hypothetical distant future when people (according to the fiction) will want a complete break with the past.   ...a complete break with the bad-old societal days.

At that future hypothetical and fictitious time, comfortable sameness won't count for anything. Therefore, then, the completely unbiased geograpical neutrality of "Southward3" (instead of N. Autumn3 would call for the use of "Southward3" instead.

But, due to objections here to "Southward3", I'll keep using "N. Autum3" as the name of this month in 28&14.

N. Autumn3 Week 1 Wednesday

Michael Ossipoff





, but there was a lot of resistance to that here.  So I switched to already-existing season-names.






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Indian National Saka Calendar Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Michael, Ziobro, Cc sirs:
>Boreal 1 - 30/31 days
Boreal 2- 31 days
Boreal 3 - 31 days
Boreal 4 - 31 days
Boreal 5 - 31 days
Boreal 6 - 31 days
Austral 1 - 30 days
Austral 2 - 30 days
Austral 3 - 30 days
Austral 4 - 30 days
Austral 5 - 30 days
>Austral 6 - 30 days

India’s National SAKA Calendar is tied with Gregorian calendar for Interbatuinal Dating Norms, which has its origin with ‘Seasonal Alignments’ - starting with the month (1)Chaitra,...(12) Phalgun having distribution of days in each month in groupings of (31*5+30*7) similar to above scheme. This is the “natural scientific” distribution; a reason for me to choose the Reform for Gregorian calendar by mere shifting ONE DAY, from July to February - the FORMAT I DISCUSSED WITH listserv on Calndr-L, since mid-2002.
To me this appear being the Easiest, Surest, and Cheapest “EVER” possibility to modify the currently used Gregorian calendar for World use. My 896-year cycle in TWO HALVES of 448-years/5541 moons (added to this 0.49287326 day duration) make this a fit proposal having Mean Year=365.242187 5 days, and Mean Lunation=29.53058886 days - a unique astronomic combination. 
Moreso, I trace its historiography down to Harappa Lunar Tithi Calendar, so far remain un-deciphered is my contribution. I believe INDO-US experts are finding ways to bridge these for better/understandable Norms for World use; and bridging the past glory of India with the future calendar needs. This may make a way to ‘liven the name of Pope Gregory XIII’ for ever - till humanity live on Earth. 
image1.jpeg

some of my calculations are shown above.
My regards, 
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.),IAF
Wednesday, 2018 Nov.28H20:86(decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 28, 2018, at 14:11, Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Michael et al

I try to keep it as simple as possible The 6 Boreal months are those during which the sun is north of the celestial equator; the 6 Austral months are those when the sun is south of the celestial equator. Its simple and unambiguous

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Walter--

(My apologies that, because I'm replying directly in e-mail, rather than in Word, it isn't possible for me to delete all of the text of the message that I'm replying to, and any previous conversation. My mailer doesn't allow deleting more than one small writing-screed of text at a time, and deleting a whole message or history of them would be unfeasibly time-consuming. Sorry.)

But during the transitional months, when transitioning between Boreal and Austral months, shouldn't the months be named accordingly, to indicate their transitionalness?   Like Australward1 & Australward2?

Also, I've been arguing that, most meaningfully, there's a time before Spring but after Winter, during which Spring is previewed a bit during othjerwise wintry weather.   ...and something similar before Autumn,  That's why designations of 6 seasons have been popular, and it's why i've been advocating such a seasonal month-system.

But it definitely makes sense to have shorter month-lengths during the north (Boreal) solar-declination period, due to the Earth's faster movement around the sun during that period.

Michael Ossipoff

On Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 12:16 PM Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Michael et al

I have been thinking of internationalizing the Indian National Civic Calendar, which has nice seastonal divisions To accomdare this, I have developed generic month names, which you may find useful. Starting with the northward equinox the months would be

Boreal 1 - 30/31 days
Boreal 2- 31 days
Boreal 3 - 31 days
Boreal 4 - 31 days
Boreal 5 - 31 days
Boreal 6 - 31 days
Austral 1 - 30 days
Austral 2 - 30 days
Austral 3 - 30 days
Austral 4 - 30 days
Austral 5 - 30 days
Austral 6 - 30 days

WalterZiobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 As much as I like the French-Republican Calendar's (FR) month-names, I use something a less specific, named 1) by solar declination; or 2) by already-existing season-names.

For greatest generality, I was first naming the seasons by solar declination, using the season-names South, Pre-Northward, Northward, North, Pre-Southward, Southward.

I like it because it's completely neutral and unbiased with respect to places north or south of the equator.

But people here expressed some resistance to change, in regards to season-names, and so I begain, instead using existing season-names, as follows:

The conventionally-named season (but with 2 additional seasons), preceded by an N or an S to denote whether that season-name is being given for places north or south of the equator.  i.e. :

N. Winter, N.Pre-Spring, N. Spring, N. Summer, N. Pre-Autumn, N. Autumn,

(...or similarly with "S" instead of "N")

That unambiguously tells the time of year, in a way that looks comfortably familiar to people. But, with it, a denoting of a season is unavoidably biased geographically.

So, to those who don't like "Soutthward3" as the name of the current season, I'd suggest that calendar-reform involves change.  Although, at least in the near-term, relative sameness doesn't provoke as much resistance, I'll remind you that the main purpose and goal of change isn't sameness.

Anyway, as I've said, 28&14  and, it seems to me, FR and UCC too, are for a hypothetical distant future when people (according to the fiction) will want a complete break with the past.   ...a complete break with the bad-old societal days.

At that future hypothetical and fictitious time, comfortable sameness won't count for anything. Therefore, then, the completely unbiased geograpical neutrality of "Southward3" (instead of N. Autumn3 would call for the use of "Southward3" instead.

But, due to objections here to "Southward3", I'll keep using "N. Autum3" as the name of this month in 28&14.

N. Autumn3 Week 1 Wednesday

Michael Ossipoff





, but there was a lot of resistance to that here.  So I switched to already-existing season-names.






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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by Walter J Ziobro

Walter—

First, I want to say that I’m encouraged by the fact that you, too, propose a naming for seasons and months that’s based on solar-declination.

.

There’s been objection, here, to my use of such naming. But your use of it shows that it isn’t as unpopular as a few recent objections have suggested.

.

For that reason, I’m returning to the use of declination-based naming of seasons and months.  (…where I’d previously switched to naming in terms of familiar season-names, with a letter to designate whether that season is specified for the northern or southern side of the equator.)

.

So:  This month, Southward3, which I’d previously changed to N. Autum3, is now Southward3 again.

.

Thanks for the encouragement of solar-declination-based naming of seasons and months.

.

[quote]

I try to keep it as simple as possible The 6 Boreal months are those during which the sun is north of the celestial equator; the 6 Austral months are those when the sun is south of the celestial equator. Its simple and unambiguous.

[/quote]

.

Yes, but I’m just saying that, personally, I prefer a seasonal calendar to name more seasons. And even the standard 4 seasons don’t seem enough. But I realize that it’s an individual subjective matter, and I don’t claim that everyone should agree with my 6 seasons.

.

As I said, having shorter seasons during the more declination-north part of the year makes sense because the Earth is closer to the Sun and goes around the Sun faster then. Your calendar’s months thereby better measure ecliptic longitude. But, speaking for myself, I don’t do it that way, because:

.

Our terrestrial seasons result from more insolation and longer day that result from higher declination in the direction of our side of the equator.  …and declination doesn’t vary in direct proportion to changes in ecliptic longitude.   …and insolation and day-length don’t vary in direct proportion to changes in declination.

.

So, for _terrestrial_ seasonal purposes, seasonal accuracy isn’t really improved by more accurately tracking ecliptic-longitude.

.

And, in any case, as Christoph mentioned, seasonal calendars can only, internationally, give a rough approximate, so precision at the cost of convenience wouldn’t be justified anyway, even if it could be achieved.

.

But I like seasonal calendars even though their explicit seasonal naming is only roughly meaningful.

.

And the convenience gained by the various reform-calendar proposals is lost by those month-lengths.

.

Southward3  Week 1  Thursday

.

Michael Ossipoff

 

 

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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Michael and Calendar People

Michael used the following date:

"Southward3  Week 1  Thursday"

This shows that my Week and Month Calendar is not the only proposed calendar that subdivides months into weeks.

Karl

Friday Epsilon December 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 29/11/2018 - 22:07 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Walter—

First, I want to say that I’m encouraged by the fact that you, too, propose a naming for seasons and months that’s based on solar-declination.

.

There’s been objection, here, to my use of such naming. But your use of it shows that it isn’t as unpopular as a few recent objections have suggested.

.

For that reason, I’m returning to the use of declination-based naming of seasons and months.  (…where I’d previously switched to naming in terms of familiar season-names, with a letter to designate whether that season is specified for the northern or southern side of the equator.)

.

So:  This month, Southward3, which I’d previously changed to N. Autum3, is now Southward3 again.

.

Thanks for the encouragement of solar-declination-based naming of seasons and months.

.

[quote]

I try to keep it as simple as possible The 6 Boreal months are those during which the sun is north of the celestial equator; the 6 Austral months are those when the sun is south of the celestial equator. Its simple and unambiguous.

[/quote]

.

Yes, but I’m just saying that, personally, I prefer a seasonal calendar to name more seasons. And even the standard 4 seasons don’t seem enough. But I realize that it’s an individual subjective matter, and I don’t claim that everyone should agree with my 6 seasons.

.

As I said, having shorter seasons during the more declination-north part of the year makes sense because the Earth is closer to the Sun and goes around the Sun faster then. Your calendar’s months thereby better measure ecliptic longitude. But, speaking for myself, I don’t do it that way, because:

.

Our terrestrial seasons result from more insolation and longer day that result from higher declination in the direction of our side of the equator.  …and declination doesn’t vary in direct proportion to changes in ecliptic longitude.   …and insolation and day-length don’t vary in direct proportion to changes in declination.

.

So, for _terrestrial_ seasonal purposes, seasonal accuracy isn’t really improved by more accurately tracking ecliptic-longitude.

.

And, in any case, as Christoph mentioned, seasonal calendars can only, internationally, give a rough approximate, so precision at the cost of convenience wouldn’t be justified anyway, even if it could be achieved.

.

But I like seasonal calendars even though their explicit seasonal naming is only roughly meaningful.

.

And the convenience gained by the various reform-calendar proposals is lost by those month-lengths.

.

Southward3  Week 1  Thursday

.

Michael Ossipoff

 

 



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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Michael Ossipoff

Before I adopted the week-numbering within months, for naming the day of a month, I made an error when posting a date. I didn't notice it, because I didn't check.  I realized that if I'd specified the day of the month in terms of the week of the month and the day of the week, that error would have been obvious even without checking. 

That showed me that specifying a day in a month in terms of the week of the month and the day of the week is significantly more convenient, for me as well as for everyone else.

When you post dates in an alternative calendar, that amounts to use of that calendar.   ....and that shows you what's more convenient and less error-prone.

Southward3  Week 1  Friday

Michael Ossipoff
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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Michael and Calendar People

This is one reason that I created the Week & Month Calendar. No other proposed calendar, I had seen before then, made use of a week of month name or number.

Karl

Saturday Epsilon November 2018
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 30/11/2018 - 18:02 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Seasonal Month-Names


Before I adopted the week-numbering within months, for naming the day of a month, I made an error when posting a date. I didn't notice it, because I didn't check.  I realized that if I'd specified the day of the month in terms of the week of the month and the day of the week, that error would have been obvious even without checking. 

That showed me that specifying a day in a month in terms of the week of the month and the day of the week is significantly more convenient, for me as well as for everyone else.

When you post dates in an alternative calendar, that amounts to use of that calendar.   ....and that shows you what's more convenient and less error-prone.

Southward3  Week 1  Friday

Michael Ossipoff


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Re: Seasonal Month-Names

Christoph Päper-2
K PALMEN:
>
> This is one reason that I created the Week & Month Calendar. No other proposed calendar, I had seen before then, made use of a week of month name or number.

I'm sure there are others, but my International (Week) Calendar does offer numbered weeks of the month for both, 13 4-week months ("moons") and 13-week quarters ("quarts") split into 3 months of 4:5:4 weeks or 30:31:30 days each.

+ Week of 4:5:4 month:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-qQ-M-wW, collapsed: ±CCYYqQ-MwW, condensed: ±CCYYqQMwW
  - for any year:         -qQ-M-wW, collapsed:      qQ-MwW, condensed:      qQMwW
  - for any month:          -q--wW, collapsed:        q-wW, no condensed form

+ Day of week of 4:5:4 month:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-qQ-M-wW-D, collapsed: ±CCYYqQ-MwW-D, condensed: ±CCYYqQMwWD
  - for any year:         -qQ-M-wW-D, collapsed:      qQ-MwW-D, condensed:      qQMwWD
  - for any month:          -q--wW-D, collapsed:        q-wW-D, no condensed form

+ Day of 30:31:30 month:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-qQ-M-DD, collapsed: ±CCYYqQ-M-DD, condensed: ±CCYYqQMDD
  - for any year:         -qQ-M-DD, collapsed:      qQ-M-DD, condensed:      qQMDD
  - for any month:          -q--DD, collapsed:        q--DD, no condensed form

+ Day of moon:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-mMM-DD, collapsed: ±CCYYmMM-DD, condensed: ±CCYYmMMDD
  - for any year:         -mMM-DD, collapsed:      mMM-DD, condensed:      mMMDD
  - for any month:          -m-DD, collapsed:        m-DD, no condensed form

+ Week of moon:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-mMM-wW, collapsed: ±CCYYmMMwW, condensed: ±CCYYmMMwW
  - for any year:         -mMM-wW, collapsed:      mMMwW, condensed:      mMMwW
  - for any month:          -m-wW, collapsed:        mwW

+ Day of week of moon:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-mMM-wW-D, collapsed: ±CCYYmMMwW-D, condensed: ±CCYYmMMwWD
  - for any year:         -mMM-wW-D, collapsed:      mMMwW-D, condensed:      mMMwWD
  - for any month:          -m-wW-D, collapsed:        mwW-D, condensed:        mwWD

Likewise, the International (Month) Calendar offers numbered weeks for the traditional months:

+ Week of month

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-MM-wW, collapsed: ±CCYY-MMwW, no condensed form
  - for any year:         -MM-wW, collapsed:      -MMwW
  - for any month:          --wW, collapsed:         wW

+ Day of week of month:

  - fully specified: ±CCYY-MM-wW-D, collapsed: ±CCYY-MMwW-D, no condensed form
  - for any year:         -MM-wW-D, collapsed:      -MMwW-D
  - for any month:          --wW-D, collapsed:         wW-D

For completeness, the International (Month) Calendar also offers a format for the n-th weekday of a traditional month:

+ Dow of month:

 - fully specified: ±CCYY-MM-W-D, no collapsed or condensed forms
 - for any year:         -MM-W-D
 - for any month:          --W-D

> Saturday Epsilon November 2018

  2018-11-E-6 (W&MC) = 201811E6 (?)
  2018-W48-6 = 2018W486 (ISWC) = 2018W48-6 (IWC)
  2018-Q4-3-01 = 2018Q4-3-01 = 2018Q4301  (IWC)
  2018-Q4-2-W5-6 = 2018Q4-2W5-6 = 2018Q42W56 (IWC)
  2018-M12-27 = 2018M12-27 = 2018M1227 (IWC, IFC)
  2018-M12-W4-6 = 2018M12W4-6 = 2018M12W46 (IWC, IFC)
  2018-11-W5-6 = 2018-11W5-6 (IMC)
  2018-12-1-6 (IMC) "first Saturday in December 2018"
  2018-12-01 = 20181201 (ISMC)

Although it might look like the International Month Calendar (IMC) would fit here, because 2018-11-E-6 looks very similar to 2018-11-W5-6, Karl's Week & Month Calendar (W&MC) is actually a variant of the International Week Calendar (IWC) -- and of Sym454, of course. As an equal-quarters calendar, it is forced to use the 'Q' marker under IC rules, which are designed to unambiguously cover as many alternate calendars as reasonably possible, and use letters only as prefixed markers and not as numbers in disguise.

The difference between 2018-11-W5 (IMC) and 2018-Q4-2-W5 (IWC) is that the former refers to the irregular (or rather: very complex) pattern that results from applying ISO's "Thursday rule" to traditional months, whereas the latter uses the proposed regular 4:5:4 pattern that results from any of 30:31:30, 31:30:30 and 30:30:31 with the same rule for week numbering applied. (The year 2018 had 4:5:4 weeks in three of its four quarters, only the first one was 4:4:5.)

By the way, I have just added a rudimentary article about the Week & Month Calendar to the Wiki. I hope it accurately represents Karl's most recent design.

  <http://calendars.wikia.com/wiki/Week_&_Month_Calendar>

Just for the record, I think I remember a suggestion by someone to use letters _A_ through _G_ instead of _T_ in datetimes to serve as a check digit that indicates the day of the week (dow), i.e. yesterday would be (optionally) designated as 2018-12-01F then.