Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
24 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Christoph Päper-2
Dear calendarists

ISO has just released a new edition of ISO 8601 "Date and Time - Representations for Information Interchange", now split into two parts. I shall read the standards later this week to see if there have been any interesting changes since the DIS had been published in late 2017.

> Dear Subscriber,
>
> Here are the latest changes to the ISO items that you are following.
>
> New documents
>
> Reference Date Title Formats
> ISO 8601-1:2019 2019-02-25 Date and time -- Representations for information interchange -- Part 1: Basic rules Online (en)
> PDF (en)
> ePub (en)
> ISO 8601-2:2019 2019-02-25 Date and time -- Representations for information interchange -- Part 2: Extensions Online (en)
> PDF (en)
> ePub (en)
> 1 - Delayed publication of language version 2 - Corrected version 3 - New format available
>
> Standards withdrawn or replaced
>
> Reference Replaced by
> ISO 8601:2004 ISO 8601-1:2019
> ISO 8601-2:2019
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Victor Engel
Are you referring to a draft? Wikipedia suggests a release in March. Well, it's almost March. The wikipedia article is rather light on the details of the change.

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 6:23 AM Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear calendarists



ISO has just released a new edition of ISO 8601 "Date and Time - Representations for Information Interchange", now split into two parts. I shall read the standards later this week to see if there have been any interesting changes since the DIS had been published in late 2017.



> Dear Subscriber,

>

> Here are the latest changes to the ISO items that you are following.

>

> New documents

>

> Reference     Date    Title   Formats

> ISO 8601-1:2019       2019-02-25      Date and time -- Representations for information interchange -- Part 1: Basic rules     Online (en)

> PDF (en)

> ePub (en)

> ISO 8601-2:2019       2019-02-25      Date and time -- Representations for information interchange -- Part 2: Extensions      Online (en)

> PDF (en)

> ePub (en)

> 1 - Delayed publication of language version   2 - Corrected version   3 - New format available

>

> Standards withdrawn or replaced

>

> Reference     Replaced by

> ISO 8601:2004         ISO 8601-1:2019

> ISO 8601-2:2019

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Christoph Päper-2
Victor Engel <[hidden email]>:
>
> Are you referring to a draft? Wikipedia suggests a release in March. Well,
> it's almost March.

It is not a draft but the revised standard. The official release date is 2018-02-25. It is already available for purchase on iso.org, but local distributors apparently need some time to update their catalog.

> The wikipedia article is rather light on the details of the change.

I'm sure this will change soon. Part 1 does not contain significant changes as far as I know, but the extensions in Part 2 are entirely new. EDTF makes up a considerable part of it and remains available for free at US Library of Congress. <https://www.loc.gov/standards/datetime/edtf.html>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Amos Shapir-2
It's funny that the EDTF standard defines numerical codes for the seasons (e.g. 2012-21 is the Spring of 2012), but does not explain how a season is defined.

On Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 11:42 AM Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:
Victor Engel <[hidden email]>:
>
> Are you referring to a draft? Wikipedia suggests a release in March. Well,
> it's almost March.

It is not a draft but the revised standard. The official release date is 2018-02-25. It is already available for purchase on iso.org, but local distributors apparently need some time to update their catalog.

> The wikipedia article is rather light on the details of the change.

I'm sure this will change soon. Part 1 does not contain significant changes as far as I know, but the extensions in Part 2 are entirely new. EDTF makes up a considerable part of it and remains available for free at US Library of Congress. <https://www.loc.gov/standards/datetime/edtf.html>


--
Amos Shapir
 
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Peter Meyer
In reply to this post by Christoph Päper-2
Amos said:

> It's funny that the EDTF standard defines numerical codes for the seasons
> (e.g. 2012-21 is the Spring of 2012), but does not explain how a season is
> defined.

Amos will surely have noted that there are separate codes for Spring
etc. in the Northern Hemisphere (25-28) and in the Southern Hemisphere
(29-31).  That said, I doubt this is especially useful, since Spring
etc. doesn't always begin at the same time in different locales.  For
example, it is said that in Astana (capital of Kazakhstan) winter lasts
9 months.

Also codes 33-41 depend on what duration is being referenced, and
assumes that the duration can be divided into 'months'.  I suspect that
'duration' implicitly assumes the Gregorian Calendar year.  Or is this
explicitly stated in the EDTF standard?  I don't see that anywhere.

Regards,
Peter
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Michael H Deckers
    On 2019-02-28 10:01, Peter Meyer wrote:


> Amos will surely have noted that there are separate codes for Spring
> etc. in the Northern Hemisphere (25-28) and in the Southern Hemisphere
> (29-31).  That said, I doubt this is especially useful, since Spring
> etc. doesn't always begin at the same time in different locales.  For
> example, it is said that in Astana (capital of Kazakhstan) winter
> lasts 9 months.
>



    Yes. This is what ISO 8601-2:2019 has to say about seasons:

      "3.1.3   Seasons
       3.1.3.1 season
       time interval resulting from the common division of a calendar
year into
       four time intervals, spring (3.1.3.2), summer (3.1.3.3), autumn
       (3.1.3.4) or winter (3.1.3.5)   "

    This is especially cryptic because four points in a calendar year
(such as
    the equinoxes and solstices) will in general bound five, not four,
intervals
    as anybody who has ever looked at a ladder and its steps will know.

      "Note 1: A single calendar date may represent different seasons
       depending on local customs or location, such as the difference
between
       the northern or southern hemispheres.   "

    Apparently, the idea that ISO 8601 should support the notation of
date and
    time, and not of temperature or location has been lost: there is no
    unique notation for the range of dates starting from the vernal equinox
    of 2019 until the next solstice:
    2019-21  can denote the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 but also
             the range 2019-09-23..2019-12-22, depending on some
             location (the writer's location or which?)
    2019-25  denotes the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 only
             on the Northern hemisphere
    2019-35  denotes the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 only
             on the Southern hemisphere
    There simply is no unambiguous notation for the range
2019-03-20..2019-06-21
    that would be valid in both London, Cape Town, and the Space Station.

      "3.1.3.2 spring
       season (3.1.3.1) following winter (3.1.3.5) and preceding summer
(3.1.3.3)

      "3.1.3.3 summer
       season (3.1.3.1) following spring (3.1.3.2) and preceding autumn
(3.1.3.4)

      "3.1.3.4 autumn
       season (3.1.3.1) following summer (3.1.3.3) and preceding winter
(3.1.3.5)

      "3.1.3.5 winter
       season (3.1.3.1) following autumn (3.1.3.4) and preceding spring
(3.1.3.2) "

    This is all that ISO 8601-2 says about what seasons are. And they
request
    150 bucks for 75 pages of such insights.

    Michael Deckers.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Michael H Deckers
    On 2019-02-28 22:26, Michael H Deckers wrote:

> 2019-35  denotes the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 only

    instead of 2019-31.


    Michael Deckers.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Claus Tøndering
In reply to this post by Michael H Deckers
   On 2019-02-28, Peter Meyer wrote:

>   2019-21  can denote the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 but also
>            the range 2019-09-23..2019-12-22, depending on some
>            location (the writer's location or which?)

Saying that spring starts on 2019-03-20 in the nothern hemisphere is, I believe, an English/American custom.

In my country, Denmark, there is no official definition of spring, and depending on whom you ask, people will say that spring starts either "when it's warm enough" or "on 1 March".


/Claus Tøndering
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Claus Tøndering
Sorry, the quoted text was written by Michael H Deckers, not Peter Meyer.

Apologies,

Claus Tøndering



From: Claus Tøndering [[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, March 1, 2019, 09:13
To: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [hidden email]
Subject: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

   On 2019-02-28, Peter Meyer wrote:

>   2019-21  can denote the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 but also
>            the range 2019-09-23..2019-12-22, depending on some
>            location (the writer's location or which?)

Saying that spring starts on 2019-03-20 in the nothern hemisphere is, I believe, an English/American custom.

In my country, Denmark, there is no official definition of spring, and depending on whom you ask, people will say that spring starts either "when it's warm enough" or "on 1 March".


/Claus Tøndering

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Michael H Deckers
Dear Peter, Michael, Amos and Calendar People

MICHAEL SAID:
   This is especially cryptic because four points in a calendar year
(such as
   the equinoxes and solstices) will in general bound five, not four,
intervals
   as anybody who has ever looked at a ladder and its steps will know.

KARL REPLIES: If ISO treats the seasons as it does weeks, there would be four seasons and the year associated with the seasons would start at the nearest season start to January 1. However I regard the defining of seasons in an international standard as a futile exercise.

Karl

Friday Epsilon February 2019

----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 28/02/2019 - 22:26 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

    On 2019-02-28 10:01, Peter Meyer wrote:


> Amos will surely have noted that there are separate codes for Spring
> etc. in the Northern Hemisphere (25-28) and in the Southern Hemisphere
> (29-31).  That said, I doubt this is especially useful, since Spring
> etc. doesn't always begin at the same time in different locales.  For
> example, it is said that in Astana (capital of Kazakhstan) winter
> lasts 9 months.
>



    Yes. This is what ISO 8601-2:2019 has to say about seasons:

      "3.1.3   Seasons
       3.1.3.1 season
       time interval resulting from the common division of a calendar
year into
       four time intervals, spring (3.1.3.2), summer (3.1.3.3), autumn
       (3.1.3.4) or winter (3.1.3.5)   "

    This is especially cryptic because four points in a calendar year
(such as
    the equinoxes and solstices) will in general bound five, not four,
intervals
    as anybody who has ever looked at a ladder and its steps will know.

      "Note 1: A single calendar date may represent different seasons
       depending on local customs or location, such as the difference
between
       the northern or southern hemispheres.   "

    Apparently, the idea that ISO 8601 should support the notation of
date and
    time, and not of temperature or location has been lost: there is no
    unique notation for the range of dates starting from the vernal equinox
    of 2019 until the next solstice:
    2019-21  can denote the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 but also
             the range 2019-09-23..2019-12-22, depending on some
             location (the writer's location or which?)
    2019-25  denotes the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 only
             on the Northern hemisphere
    2019-35  denotes the range 2019-03-20..2019-06-21 only
             on the Southern hemisphere
    There simply is no unambiguous notation for the range
2019-03-20..2019-06-21
    that would be valid in both London, Cape Town, and the Space Station.

      "3.1.3.2 spring
       season (3.1.3.1) following winter (3.1.3.5) and preceding summer
(3.1.3.3)

      "3.1.3.3 summer
       season (3.1.3.1) following spring (3.1.3.2) and preceding autumn
(3.1.3.4)

      "3.1.3.4 autumn
       season (3.1.3.1) following summer (3.1.3.3) and preceding winter
(3.1.3.5)

      "3.1.3.5 winter
       season (3.1.3.1) following autumn (3.1.3.4) and preceding spring
(3.1.3.2) "

    This is all that ISO 8601-2 says about what seasons are. And they
request
    150 bucks for 75 pages of such insights.

    Michael Deckers.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Michael H Deckers
In reply to this post by Claus Tøndering
On 2019-03-01 08:13, Claus Tøndering wrote:

> Saying that spring starts on 2019-03-20 in the nothern hemisphere is,
> I believe, an English/American custom.
>
> In my country, Denmark, there is no official definition of spring, and
> depending on whom you ask, people will say that spring starts either
> "when it's warm enough" or "on 1 March".
>
    The dates are from the astronomical ephemeris for 2019. They
    refer to UTC and are independent of customs in the country of
    observance.

    The seasons have been defined for over 2000 years as the intervals
    between the equinoctial and solstitial points, as I mentioned. Their
    precise definition depends somewhat on the choice of precession
    of the ecliptic and the mean equator and other things, but they are
    geocentric phenomena, independent from the location of an observer.

    There is also a meteorological convention for the seasons which
    does not refer to any astronomical phenomena; it is usually
    qualified with "meteorological".

    HTH.

    Michael Deckers.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Christoph Päper-2
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir-2
Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> hat am 27. Februar 2019 um 16:44 geschrieben:
>
> It's funny that the EDTF standard defines numerical codes for the seasons
> (e.g. 2012-21 is the Spring of 2012), but does not explain how a season is
> defined.

It's more stupid than funny. I tried to argue against standardizing this. The apparent scope of this is bibliography, where some periodicals are issued four times a year and labeled by the classic European seasons, beginning with Spring = -21, although the systematics of ISO 8601 clearly afford the year starting with Winter, because most of its days are in the later year it is part of.

Btw.: My local distributor still does not have the standard available for download, unfortunately.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Christoph Päper-2
In reply to this post by Michael H Deckers
Michael H Deckers:
>
>     The seasons have been defined for over 2000 years as the intervals
>     between the equinoctial and solstitial points, as I mentioned. [...]
>
>     There is also a meteorological convention for the seasons which
>     does not refer to any astronomical phenomena; it is usually
>     qualified with "meteorological".

Elsewhere, "astronomical" is also used for disambiguation, because -- as sufficiently noted -- there are different definitions for seasons, e.g. ones with solar extreme points at their midpoint (not their boundary). Anyway, many of those would have fit into the MM field of CCYY-MM dates repurposed by EDTF and hence ISO 8601-2, as I have outlined about a year ago on the EDTF mailing list and I believe on here as well, but I have also put them into a Google document for reference:

<https://goo.gl/UEUFcR> = <https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vT_o5MImxCsslpVZSMlXaPZn6BXknlCBAHec_1zXfmuVP_Wg8MmhQJGcZy9ArVJ6P9ZCn0ock2fA29i/pubhtml>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Michael Ossipoff

[quote]
This is especially cryptic because four points in a calendar year (such as
the equinoxes and solstices) will in general bound five, not four,
intervals
    as anybody who has ever looked at a ladder and its steps will know.
[/quote]

Incorrect. Four solar ecliptic-longitude cardinal-points (2 solstiices and 2 equinoxes)  bound 4 astronomical-quarters .

Michael Ossipoff

11 Th
1745 UTC

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 12:21 PM Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael H Deckers:
>
>     The seasons have been defined for over 2000 years as the intervals
>     between the equinoctial and solstitial points, as I mentioned. [...]
>
>     There is also a meteorological convention for the seasons which
>     does not refer to any astronomical phenomena; it is usually
>     qualified with "meteorological".

Elsewhere, "astronomical" is also used for disambiguation, because -- as sufficiently noted -- there are different definitions for seasons, e.g. ones with solar extreme points at their midpoint (not their boundary). Anyway, many of those would have fit into the MM field of CCYY-MM dates repurposed by EDTF and hence ISO 8601-2, as I have outlined about a year ago on the EDTF mailing list and I believe on here as well, but I have also put them into a Google document for reference:

<https://goo.gl/UEUFcR> = <https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vT_o5MImxCsslpVZSMlXaPZn6BXknlCBAHec_1zXfmuVP_Wg8MmhQJGcZy9ArVJ6P9ZCn0ock2fA29i/pubhtml>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Christoph Päper-2

Dear Cristophe

What are the current standard European designations for the seasons? Do they differ by country?

WalterZiobro




On Thursday, March 7, 2019 Christoph Päper <[hidden email]> wrote:

Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> hat am 27. Februar 2019 um 16:44 geschrieben:

>
> It's funny that the EDTF standard defines numerical codes for the seasons
> (e.g. 2012-21 is the Spring of 2012), but does not explain how a season is
> defined.


It's more stupid than funny. I tried to argue against standardizing this. The apparent scope of this is bibliography, where some periodicals are issued four times a year and labeled by the classic European seasons, beginning with Spring = -21, although the systematics of ISO 8601 clearly afford the year starting with Winter, because most of its days are in the later year it is part of.

Btw.: My local distributor still does not have the standard available for download, unfortunately.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Christoph Päper-2
Walter J Ziobro:
>
> What are the current standard European designations for the seasons? Do they differ by country?

I can't assess the situation in all of Europe, but in Germany, the astronomical definition is most prevalent: spring ("Frühling" or "Frühjahr") is the first season of the year and begins, like the Zodiac, with the March equinox, followed by summer ("Sommer") with the June solstice, autumn ("Herbst") with the September equinox and finally winter ("Winter") with the December solstice. The meteorological definition, where each season spans exactly three Gregorian months (Dec+Jan+Feb, Mar+Apr+May, Jun+Jul+Aug, Sep+Oct+Nov), is lately gaining traction, however.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Sepp Rothwangl
March equinox 2019 will be at 22:58 on
Wednesday
,
20 March
The next full moon will be:
Thursday * 21 March 2019 * 2:42:52 am 
Central European Time (CET)

THUS EASTER SHOULD BE CALCULATED AS DEFINED BY THE NICEAN COUNCIL AT SUNDAY 24TH MARCH


Sepp Rothwangl, CEP -239.611
SEAC Fellow



Am 08.03.2019 um 13:48 schrieb Christoph Päper <[hidden email]>:

Walter J Ziobro:

What are the current standard European designations for the seasons? Do they differ by country?

I can't assess the situation in all of Europe, but in Germany, the astronomical definition is most prevalent: spring ("Frühling" or "Frühjahr") is the first season of the year and begins, like the Zodiac, with the March equinox, followed by summer ("Sommer") with the June solstice, autumn ("Herbst") with the September equinox and finally winter ("Winter") with the December solstice. The meteorological definition, where each season spans exactly three Gregorian months (Dec+Jan+Feb, Mar+Apr+May, Jun+Jul+Aug, Sep+Oct+Nov), is lately gaining traction, however.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Otero, Daniel

I suspect that Easter is indeed calculated as defined by Nicaea, but that the actual sun is not used in these calculations. Instead, they use a “mean” sun of sorts that is assumed to satisfy certain highly regular motions that are not quite the same as those of the real sun.

 

--Danny

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Sepp ROTHWANGL <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]>
Date: Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:18 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

 

March equinox 2019 will be at 22:58 on

Wednesday

,

20 March

The next full moon will be:
Thursday * 21 March 2019 * 2:42:52 am 

Central European Time (CET)

 

THUS EASTER SHOULD BE CALCULATED AS DEFINED BY THE NICEAN COUNCIL AT SUNDAY 24TH MARCH

 

 

Sepp Rothwangl, CEP -239.611

SEAC Fellow

[hidden email]

www.calendersign.com

 

 

Am 08.03.2019 um 13:48 schrieb Christoph Päper <[hidden email]>:



Walter J Ziobro:


What are the current standard European designations for the seasons? Do they differ by country?


I can't assess the situation in all of Europe, but in Germany, the astronomical definition is most prevalent: spring ("Frühling" or "Frühjahr") is the first season of the year and begins, like the Zodiac, with the March equinox, followed by summer ("Sommer") with the June solstice, autumn ("Herbst") with the September equinox and finally winter ("Winter") with the December solstice. The meteorological definition, where each season spans exactly three Gregorian months (Dec+Jan+Feb, Mar+Apr+May, Jun+Jul+Aug, Sep+Oct+Nov), is lately gaining traction, however.



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019

Sepp Rothwangl
Danny,
No! The Catholics choose 21st of March as eternal „calendrical“ vernal equinox

Crazy!

Sepp Rothwangl, CEP -239.611
SEAC Fellow



Am 08.03.2019 um 15:10 schrieb Otero, Daniel <[hidden email]>:

I suspect that Easter is indeed calculated as defined by Nicaea, but that the actual sun is not used in these calculations. Instead, they use a “mean” sun of sorts that is assumed to satisfy certain highly regular motions that are not quite the same as those of the real sun.
 
--Danny
 
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Sepp ROTHWANGL <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]>
Date: Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:18 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: Release of ISO 8601-1:2019 and ISO 8601-2:2019
 
March equinox 2019 will be at 22:58 on
Wednesday
,
20 March
The next full moon will be:
Thursday * 21 March 2019 * 2:42:52 am 
Central European Time (CET)
 
THUS EASTER SHOULD BE CALCULATED AS DEFINED BY THE NICEAN COUNCIL AT SUNDAY 24TH MARCH
 
 

Sepp Rothwangl, CEP -239.611

SEAC Fellow

[hidden email]

www.calendersign.com

 
 
Am 08.03.2019 um 13:48 schrieb Christoph Päper <[hidden email]>:


Walter J Ziobro:


What are the current standard European designations for the seasons? Do they differ by country?

I can't assess the situation in all of Europe, but in Germany, the astronomical definition is most prevalent: spring ("Frühling" or "Frühjahr") is the first season of the year and begins, like the Zodiac, with the March equinox, followed by summer ("Sommer") with the June solstice, autumn ("Herbst") with the September equinox and finally winter ("Winter") with the December solstice. The meteorological definition, where each season spans exactly three Gregorian months (Dec+Jan+Feb, Mar+Apr+May, Jun+Jul+Aug, Sep+Oct+Nov), is lately gaining traction, however.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Date of Easter

Christoph Päper-2
In reply to this post by Sepp Rothwangl
Sepp ROTHWANGL <[hidden email]>:
>
> March equinox 2019 will be at 22:58 on
> Wednesday, 20 March
> The next full moon will be:
> Thursday * 21 March 2019 * 2:42:52 am Central European Time (CET)
>
> THUS EASTER SHOULD BE CALCULATED AS DEFINED BY THE NICEAN COUNCIL AT SUNDAY 24TH MARCH

Well, the Aleppo plan, which would have ensured this, has not been adopted by anyone. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_Easter_dating_method> I just realized that I need to reread some stuff, because I thought this plan resulted in the same possibilities for the date of Easter as the Gregorian Computus (i.e. 22 March through 25 April), but the Wikipedia article claims that 21 March and 26 April would become possible as well.

Anyway, we do not know *exactly* what was decided in Nicaea, but one outcome currently violated was that all Christians around the world should celebrate it on the same date. A purely astronomic determination does not really suit contemporary public needs. A looser interpretation of "after the first vernal full moon" could yield a "fixed" date of Easter, which probably would be widely welcome. <https://www.change.org/p/wcc-unify-and-fix-the-date-of-easter>
12