People prefer the hard way.

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People prefer the hard way.

Michael Ossipoff

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Phil De Rosa
Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Hello Phil De Rosa, Cc sirs:
YES, I am the person who wrote “Both these pieces”. My ideas on The Metric Calendar Year (1973-1991+++) remained active till I
image1.png
realised, Metric Norms for Time Standard & the duration of The Metric Second (1973 April) including s viable definition for Nautical Kilometre fixing Arc-angle via Radian *could be the only hope for progressive aims to the Reform of Gregorian Calendar*; I decided to shelve my ideas and switched to work upon several other options - I decided NOT FOR ANY MAJOR CHANGE, and kept trying other options till I relived that SIMPLE shifting of July 31 to 2nd month I.e. as February 29th could fix most drawbacks, 
image2.jpeg
causing hinderance/impediments has now resulted in LETHARGIC MENTAL ATTITUDE - dead end for my pointing that ‘offices of The World Calendar Organisation can be closed & billions saved for forecasted Economic crunch of United States. 

Please find news clip of Mr Brij Bhushan Vij newscast on JAN tv, Jaipur 2018 Mar.08 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-CyoZXqK94o

Tithi=(25947/25920)Molad

=29.49985984Molad=29.53058886 days. 

 This above interview was recorded & telecasted, while I was in India. 

I have exhatively discussed my works since I first published as A World Calendar for All Ages (The Ttibune, Chandigarh; 1971 June 06. I recall we were in communication long ago from India/after migration to US around mid-2002/2005. 

Thanks & in good remembrance,

Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️ 

Tuesday, 2019 April, 02H21:56 (decimal)


Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 20:42, Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
PHIL:

The whole system sounds REMARKABLY like what the French Republicans did, except that there were 10 hours in the entire solar day.

Regards,
Jamison

14 Germinal CCXXVII, Beech Tree.

Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
WALTER:

Your idea of changing the metric system has merits, I shall admit.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC

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Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Walter J Ziobro
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



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Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
image1.jpeg
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

You make some very good points. But the Metric System in use by all countries except the USA and Liberia (Myanmar switched to Metric a couple of years ago) is based on 10. We all know the reason. 100 cm in a meter. 1,000 meters in a km. 1,000 ml in a liter etc, etc. Its simply a matter of dividing everything by tens, hundreds, and thousands. All you have to do is move the decimal point, or add or remove zeros. This is much easier than 12 inches per foot, 3 feet per yard, 5280 feet in a mile, 16 ounces in a pound, etc. And that is in Avuadupois (sp?) Weight. There is also Troy Weight, and Apothecary's Weight, in both of which there are 12 ounces to a pound, and several other differences. Of course the average American uses Av. Weight, and is completely unfamiliar with Troy and Apothecary's Weights. Years ago, pharmacists used Apothecary's Weight, and jewellers used Troy Weight, but both professions have switched to the Metric System. You would be hard-pressed to find anybody in either profession who still understands the old measures, and I admit, they are completely beyond me.

The military and the US Government also use the Metric System, although when civilians are involved, those measures are always converted to US Standard. And in the markets, US Standard is always used, but is always converted to Metric on the label, usually in parentheses. Automobiles are created withe speedometer having readings in both Standard and Metric. If the car is made in the US, US standard will be used. If it is made outside the US, Metric will be used. Mechanics have to have two sets of tools, one Standard, and one Metric, to work on all cars.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1053/RAW"" alt="image1.jpeg" id="44156F0E-F759-49C2-9B68-4E419A09C78C">
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Jaimison Cc sirs:
>If the car is made in the US, US standard will be used. If it is made outside the US, Metric will be used. Mechanics have to have two sets of tools, one Standard, and one >Metric, to work on all cars.
THIS PRECISELY, I have been harping ‘ on deaf ears’ that failure of SI METRIC  SYSTEM  has got itself defeated because of ill teaching and/or learning dual standards. This would have not occurred had METRE been tied with the length unit Metre TO BELONG TO Metric SI Unites - and then the ‘Voluntry’ teaching/learning process.
image1.jpeg
My grandchildren refuse to learn the Metric System of Units, since NOT MANDATORY to know or learn to use defeating America in the competitive trade & technology, is my view. There is a need to address THIS SIRS!
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H05:19 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 04:48, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

You make some very good points. But the Metric System in use by all countries except the USA and Liberia (Myanmar switched to Metric a couple of years ago) is based on 10. We all know the reason. 100 cm in a meter. 1,000 meters in a km. 1,000 ml in a liter etc, etc. Its simply a matter of dividing everything by tens, hundreds, and thousands. All you have to do is move the decimal point, or add or remove zeros. This is much easier than 12 inches per foot, 3 feet per yard, 5280 feet in a mile, 16 ounces in a pound, etc. And that is in Avuadupois (sp?) Weight. There is also Troy Weight, and Apothecary's Weight, in both of which there are 12 ounces to a pound, and several other differences. Of course the average American uses Av. Weight, and is completely unfamiliar with Troy and Apothecary's Weights. Years ago, pharmacists used Apothecary's Weight, and jewellers used Troy Weight, but both professions have switched to the Metric System. You would be hard-pressed to find anybody in either profession who still understands the old measures, and I admit, they are completely beyond me.

The military and the US Government also use the Metric System, although when civilians are involved, those measures are always converted to US Standard. And in the markets, US Standard is always used, but is always converted to Metric on the label, usually in parentheses. Automobiles are created withe speedometer having readings in both Standard and Metric. If the car is made in the US, US standard will be used. If it is made outside the US, Metric will be used. Mechanics have to have two sets of tools, one Standard, and one Metric, to work on all cars.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1053/RAW" ?="" alt="image1.jpeg" id="44156F0E-F759-49C2-9B68-4E419A09C78C">
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

I certainly agree. First, your grandchildren will be taught Metric in their Mathematics course in school. Granted, they might learn it for the test and then promptly forget it, but they will learn. I have no idea of their ages, but as their Grandfather, you should make your best effort to teach them Metric. Depending on how you present it, they may begin to show interest. Good luck with that, and I am NOT being snarky when I say that. I truly hope that you can convince them of the necessity of learning Metric today.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison Cc sirs:
>If the car is made in the US, US standard will be used. If it is made outside the US, Metric will be used. Mechanics have to have two sets of tools, one Standard, and one >Metric, to work on all cars.
THIS PRECISELY, I have been harping ‘ on deaf ears’ that failure of SI METRIC  SYSTEM  has got itself defeated because of ill teaching and/or learning dual standards. This would have not occurred had METRE been tied with the length unit Metre TO BELONG TO Metric SI Unites - and then the ‘Voluntry’ teaching/learning process.
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1054/RAW"" alt="image1.jpeg" id="ABB009A4-EE1B-44FB-AEC1-461246557908">
My grandchildren refuse to learn the Metric System of Units, since NOT MANDATORY to know or learn to use defeating America in the competitive trade & technology, is my view. There is a need to address THIS SIRS!
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H05:19 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 04:48, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

You make some very good points. But the Metric System in use by all countries except the USA and Liberia (Myanmar switched to Metric a couple of years ago) is based on 10. We all know the reason. 100 cm in a meter. 1,000 meters in a km. 1,000 ml in a liter etc, etc. Its simply a matter of dividing everything by tens, hundreds, and thousands. All you have to do is move the decimal point, or add or remove zeros. This is much easier than 12 inches per foot, 3 feet per yard, 5280 feet in a mile, 16 ounces in a pound, etc. And that is in Avuadupois (sp?) Weight. There is also Troy Weight, and Apothecary's Weight, in both of which there are 12 ounces to a pound, and several other differences. Of course the average American uses Av. Weight, and is completely unfamiliar with Troy and Apothecary's Weights. Years ago, pharmacists used Apothecary's Weight, and jewellers used Troy Weight, but both professions have switched to the Metric System. You would be hard-pressed to find anybody in either profession who still understands the old measures, and I admit, they are completely beyond me.

The military and the US Government also use the Metric System, although when civilians are involved, those measures are always converted to US Standard. And in the markets, US Standard is always used, but is always converted to Metric on the label, usually in parentheses. Automobiles are created withe speedometer having readings in both Standard and Metric. If the car is made in the US, US standard will be used. If it is made outside the US, Metric will be used. Mechanics have to have two sets of tools, one Standard, and one Metric, to work on all cars.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1053/RAW" ?="" alt="image1.jpeg" id="44156F0E-F759-49C2-9B68-4E419A09C78C">
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



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Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:

Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
image1.jpeg
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
WALTER:

Can you put up a link to the Indonesian Calendar of which you speak? Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:

Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1055/RAW"" id="yiv186462132044156F0E-F759-49C2-9B68-4E419A09C78C" style="height:auto; width:auto; max-width : 180px;" max-height: 260px yahoo_partid="2" alt="image1.jpeg">
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ

Dear Jamison

Well there are actually several calendars used in Indonesia, most prominently the Javanese Calendar and the Balinese Calendar Both are actually lunar calendars with the Pawukon day count running with them. You can actually find descriptions of each on Wikipedia under Pawukon, Javanese, and Balinese Calendar respectively The Javanese calendar is basically a version of the Islamic calendar with Indonesion names

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

WALTER:

Can you put up a link to the Indonesian Calendar of which you speak? Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro


On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
image1.jpeg
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



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19-year Harappa Cycle Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Jaimison, Walter Cc sirs:
My linking the Lunar Tithi calendar with Harappa 19-year cycle, using either of my Tithi values 1+335/326919 day or 1+338/ 326919 day using 6932+1/2 tithi is a perfect fit with my (named) Indus Lunar Tithi 
image1.jpeg
calendar has the FORMAT of Gregorian calendar names (having 13th from each month removed) becomes of 353/354 Tithi calendar. A minor extension of ‘last half tithi’, 
image2.jpeg
still lesser than the Tithi Unit, make it useful ESPECIALLY this added ‘solar time duration’ is self consumed with an EXTRA Moon over a period of about the Cycle of Precession. My calculations were exhaustively projected & discussed for comparison with other Lunar calendars, and betters the Hebrew Lunar Molad Calendar. Thus, make my INVENTED 2*(448-year/5541 Moons) Cycle a unique lunisolar combination. My 19-year Lunar-Solar combination has been exhaustively discussed.
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️ 
Thursday, 2019 April 04H17:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 16:12, Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Jamison

Well there are actually several calendars used in Indonesia, most prominently the Javanese Calendar and the Balinese Calendar Both are actually lunar calendars with the Pawukon day count running with them. You can actually find descriptions of each on Wikipedia under Pawukon, Javanese, and Balinese Calendar respectively The Javanese calendar is basically a version of the Islamic calendar with Indonesion names

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

WALTER:

Can you put up a link to the Indonesian Calendar of which you speak? Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro


On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 

definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
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|

Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
WALTER:

I shall review the Wikipedia entries thoroughly in the next day or two. Thank you.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Jamison

Well there are actually several calendars used in Indonesia, most prominently the Javanese Calendar and the Balinese Calendar Both are actually lunar calendars with the Pawukon day count running with them. You can actually find descriptions of each on Wikipedia under Pawukon, Javanese, and Balinese Calendar respectively The Javanese calendar is basically a version of the Islamic calendar with Indonesion names

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

WALTER:

Can you put up a link to the Indonesian Calendar of which you speak? Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro


On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 
image1.jpeg
definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 19-year Harappa Cycle Re: Base 60 & Metre Re: Number bases Re: People prefer the hard way.

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

I see what you are doing, is making the GC a lunar calendar by removing the 13th day of every month. I realise some Westerners, superstitious people, believe that the number 13 is unlucky. First, such thoughts are illogical, and unworthy of a cultured society. Second, my question is: Why would you want to convert the GC, which is a solar calendar, into a lunar calendar? There are plenty of lunar, or luni-solar, calendars out there (the Muslim and the Jewish come to mind, the first a lunar calendar, the second luni-solar) if you want them. Why do we need to make the Gregorian Calendar another of them?

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter Cc sirs:
My linking the Lunar Tithi calendar with Harappa 19-year cycle, using either of my Tithi values 1+335/326919 day or 1+338/ 326919 day using 6932+1/2 tithi is a perfect fit with my (named) Indus Lunar Tithi 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1056/RAW"" alt="image1.jpeg" id="AEF239CC-1AD0-47C0-AAE8-2D272D71E21D">
calendar has the FORMAT of Gregorian calendar names (having 13th from each month removed) becomes of 353/354 Tithi calendar. A minor extension of ‘last half tithi’, 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1057/RAW"" alt="image2.jpeg" id="44EAC2E3-F445-4F29-A492-D47B11447AD9">
still lesser than the Tithi Unit, make it useful ESPECIALLY this added ‘solar time duration’ is self consumed with an EXTRA Moon over a period of about the Cycle of Precession. My calculations were exhaustively projected & discussed for comparison with other Lunar calendars, and betters the Hebrew Lunar Molad Calendar. Thus, make my INVENTED 2*(448-year/5541 Moons) Cycle a unique lunisolar combination. My 19-year Lunar-Solar combination has been exhaustively discussed.
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️ 
Thursday, 2019 April 04H17:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 16:12, Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Jamison

Well there are actually several calendars used in Indonesia, most prominently the Javanese Calendar and the Balinese Calendar Both are actually lunar calendars with the Pawukon day count running with them. You can actually find descriptions of each on Wikipedia under Pawukon, Javanese, and Balinese Calendar respectively The Javanese calendar is basically a version of the Islamic calendar with Indonesion names

Walter Ziobro




On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

WALTER:

Can you put up a link to the Indonesian Calendar of which you speak? Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Jamison

15 Germinal CCXXVII, Bee.

Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Brij et al

Base 60 is interesting Its prime factors are 2x2x3x5 Base 30 is a bit more fundamental IMO because its prime factors are simply 2x3x5

In this regard, the Indonesians have a day count system called a Pawukon of 210 days, the prime factors of which are 2x3x5x7 It can be divided into several kinds of weeks The Indonesians use both 5 day weeks and 7 day weeks simultaneously, and combine then to make 35 day months called Wetonans

Walter Ziobro


On Thursday, April 4, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jaimison, Walter, Karl Cc sirs:
>Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far >off with base 60, which I think was >achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10.
Base 60 was a natural choice for ancients both ‘Babylonians & Hindus - Suryavanshi’s & Chandravanshi’s; because of its divisiblity with 10 numbers, 2,3,4,5,6,10,12,15,20 & 30.
Metric Systeme of Unites had this advantage of EASE, but technocrats for whatever reason mixed up ‘Metre & Ten (10)’ which led to confusion, to treat 10 belonging to the Metric System! They forgot that division with 10 was only an added advantage; while any system of units cannot be called METRIC unless sub-divisions of the Units are also related to length Unit - Metre has remained my view. Accordingly, my arriving at the new 

definition for Nautical Kilometre, to be able to shelve Nautical Mile of 1852 Metres, among historic records; as also to become the link between Arc-Radian-Length, to belong to the Metric Systeme of Unites. THIS LED TO SEPERATE “Metre & Knots - Nautical Miles”, possibly causing failure of French Republican Calendar to hardly last for 13-years, is my view? Did Think Tanks fail here or was it a deliberate attempt.
Base count to 100, is a good attempt to make use of the concept of Power of ZERO?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 04H04:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2019, at 03:04, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sounds very interesting, although I have to read more about metric calendars to comment intelligently.

K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Walter and Calendar People

But 30 has the disadvantage that it is between two prime numbers, whereas 10 is next to composite 9, which allows one to determine divisibility by 3 and 9 by digit total. Also 30 is large requiring more digit characters. 6 is the product of the first two primes and is next the following 2 primes allowing easy divisibility rules for all numbers up to ten. 30 falls at 7 like 10 does.

Nevertheless the Babylonians were not far off with base 60, which I think was achieved by a mix of base 6 and base 10. 60 is also between two primes, but 120 is between two composite numbers.

Karl

Thursday Alpha April 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 03/04/2019 - 11:44 (BST)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: People prefer the hard way.

Dear Phil et al

Like Napoleon, I have thought that the decimal metric system was limited because it only had 2 prime factors (2 and 5) IMO, base 30 would make a better metric system because it has 3 prime factors (2, 3 and 5) So, we could have, for instance, a metric foot of 30 centimeters, a metric fluid ounce of 30 milliliters, a metric pound of 450 grams (30 x 15) a metric month of 30 days and so on

WalterZiobro




On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Phil De Rosa <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Brij and all.  In going through my ‘piles of files’ I came across a page from a Montreal newspaper called the ‘Pragati’ and dated 1991 and in which there was an article about Brij’s Metric calendar proposal in India.  It suggests 100 metric seconds in a metric minute, 100 metric minutes in a metric hour, and 10 metric hours in a day or night span making an entire metric day contain 20 metric hours.  A metric week would comprise 10 days.  There is no mention of how many metric weeks in a month, if months are still used in his calendar, but I assume there would be three.  Brij goes on to say that in 1956 when India changed from the British foot-pound-second system to the centimetre-gram-second system it changed the first two but left the seconds component as it was.  He suggested that the system of time measurement should also be made metric.
 
Phil De Rosa
White Rock, BC, Canada
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: People prefer the hard way.
 
              A CASE FOR FEBRUARY 29th
Jaimison, Amos Cc sirs:
> You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the >Churches to agree on a common date for >Easter,....
True, where then was the need for PROMOTING ‘ideas of Reform of Calendar’; and now undergoing ‘discussions’ heading toward THE BLOCKED WALL?
My pleading and producing required calculations has been for ‘IMPROVING THE ASTRONOMERS’ AVERAGE MEAN YEAR VALUE’ closer to actual motion of Earth; and to the natural JOY OF INDIVIDUALS BORN ON FEBRUARY 29th; to celebrate their Birth Date EVERY YEAR?
It has been generous of EXPERTS to allow me to remain on this CALNDR-L group. The very EXISTANCE of World Calendar Organisation has now become “doubtful”?
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Tuesday, 2019 April 02H06:97 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 2, 2019, at 05:39, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

MICHAEL, much as I am in favour of calendar reform, the fact is, it takes far too much effort, money, and time to do. It is actually easier to stay with the calendar we have got, however illogical. You speak of "doing things the hard way". It is actually harder to make the change to another calendar than it is to remain with the GC. And certainly the GC works best for religious purposes. We cannot even get the Churches to agree on a common date for Easter, let alone get anyone to agree to change the calendar. Much as I would like to see it, it isn't really realistic to expect that it will occur.

Regards,
Jamison

13 Germinal CCXXVII, Morel.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
 

Most alternative calendars proposed would be more convenient than our Roman-Gregorian.  Some, like the WeekDate calendars, such as South-Solstice WeekDate, would be more easy and convenient than the other alternative calendars.

.

But calendar-reform proposals are usually met with indifference or resentment. People want to keep things the same, to do things as they’ve always done them.   …which presumably is why they’ve been using the Roman months unchanged for millennia.

.

Well, if people insist on continuing to do things the hard way, of course that’s their business and their choice.

.

Michael Ossipoff

.

15 Tu

0452 UTC



12