Over the river and through the wood

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Over the river and through the wood

Victor Engel
Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor
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Re: Over the river and through the wood

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor


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Re: Over the river and through the wood

Victor Engel
Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor


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Re: Over the river and through the wood

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Victor and Calendar People

  Has Victor read the wikipedia page on Thanksgiving?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving_(United_States)
There is plenty of information there.

Karl

Thursday Gamma March 2019

Thanksgiving would be on Thursday Delta November
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 20/03/2019 - 13:13 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Over the river and through the wood

Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor




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Re: Over the river and through the wood

Victor Engel
Dear Karl,

Yes. That article is very light on the mid-1800s when the poem was written. There is another site that is more targeted to the 1800s.


Victor

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 4:40 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

  Has Victor read the wikipedia page on Thanksgiving?
There is plenty of information there.

Karl

Thursday Gamma March 2019

Thanksgiving would be on Thursday Delta November
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 20/03/2019 - 13:13 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Over the river and through the wood

Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor




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Re: Over the river and through the wood

sparkielee
I remember reading about the different dates that Thanksgiving was celebrated. I remember reading that one of them was December 8, which happens to be my birthday. 
Do you know that Thanksgiving is celebrated in October in Canada?

Paula

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 1:48 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Karl,

Yes. That article is very light on the mid-1800s when the poem was written. There is another site that is more targeted to the 1800s.


Victor

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 4:40 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

  Has Victor read the wikipedia page on Thanksgiving?
There is plenty of information there.

Karl

Thursday Gamma March 2019

Thanksgiving would be on Thursday Delta November
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 20/03/2019 - 13:13 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Over the river and through the wood

Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor




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Re: Over the river and through the wood

Ed Kohout-2
Hi Listers,

Question:  Is the current calendric rule for Thanksgiving in the USA designed to ensure that the Sun has moved out of the tropical zodiac sign of Scorpio, and would that mean the holiday holds a bit of superstition in American politics?

- Ed

********************************

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 8:43 PM, Paula Spart
I remember reading about the different dates that Thanksgiving was celebrated. I remember reading that one of them was December 8, which happens to be my birthday. 
Do you know that Thanksgiving is celebrated in October in Canada?

Paula

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 1:48 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Karl,

Yes. That article is very light on the mid-1800s when the poem was written. There is another site that is more targeted to the 1800s.


Victor

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 4:40 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

  Has Victor read the wikipedia page on Thanksgiving?
There is plenty of information there.

Karl

Thursday Gamma March 2019

Thanksgiving would be on Thursday Delta November
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 20/03/2019 - 13:13 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Over the river and through the wood

Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor




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Re: Over the river and through the wood

Victor Engel
In reply to this post by sparkielee
Since I'm Canadian, yes, I knew that. Also, Canadian Thanksgiving is older, depending how you count. If you go by the links posted so far, Canadian goes back to the 1500s, US only to the 1600s. :)

Victor

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 9:43 PM Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I remember reading about the different dates that Thanksgiving was celebrated. I remember reading that one of them was December 8, which happens to be my birthday. 
Do you know that Thanksgiving is celebrated in October in Canada?

Paula

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 1:48 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Karl,

Yes. That article is very light on the mid-1800s when the poem was written. There is another site that is more targeted to the 1800s.


Victor

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 4:40 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

  Has Victor read the wikipedia page on Thanksgiving?
There is plenty of information there.

Karl

Thursday Gamma March 2019

Thanksgiving would be on Thursday Delta November
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 20/03/2019 - 13:13 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Over the river and through the wood

Dear Karl,

Yes, an American song - commonly song among the Christmas carols. What it has to do with calendars is that it is popularly thought of as a Christmas song, especially since it refers to drifting snow. However, it was originally written as a Thanksgiving poem. So the question is, when was Thanksgiving celebrated around the time it was published (1844). I believe it was Lincoln who suggested it be celebrated the 4th Thursday or possibly last Thursday of November. But prior to that, I think it was celebrated from October to January. Maybe there were some local traditions with specific calendar dates when it was celebrated. Or perhaps it was not celebrated on a specific date at all until formalized. That's what I'm after.

Victor

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 4:29 AM K PALMEN <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Victor and Calendar People

   I'm not familiar with the song. It may be a U.S. song only.

   What has it to do with calendars?

Karl

Wednesday Gamma March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 19/03/2019 - 13:10 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Over the river and through the wood

Dear Calendar People,

Most of us are familiar with this Christmas song about going to grandmother's house, but originally, it was a Thanksgiving song about going to grandfather's house. Originally published around 1844, the popular explanation for snow around Thanksgiving is that there was a mini-ice age around that time.

However, there is more to it than that. US Thanksgiving Day was not set until decades later. In fact, there are newspaper articles surrounding Thanksgiving dated in mid-December. I suspect this is a more relevant explanation for the snow than the mini-ice age.

Perhaps someone on the list can offer more specific details?

Victor