Moon's phases

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Moon's phases

Aristeo Fernando-3
Dear Calendar People,

It is hard to make the lunar calendar a solar calendar, and vice versa.  So why not make a separate lunar calendar to a solar calendar, just like now wherein in the Gregorian calendar, the phases of the moon (example, new, first quarter, full, last quarter) are indicated. 

Kind regards,
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Moon's phases

Amos Shapir-2
Hi Aristeo and calendar people,

As a matter of fact, teh Gregorian calendar is such a calendar.  Calculation of moon phases is an integral part of its algorithm; these are used mainly to determine the date of Easter and correlating dates, but it's easy to use it to mark down moon phases all along the year.

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 12:11 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People,

It is hard to make the lunar calendar a solar calendar, and vice versa.  So why not make a separate lunar calendar to a solar calendar, just like now wherein in the Gregorian calendar, the phases of the moon (example, new, first quarter, full, last quarter) are indicated. 

Kind regards,
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."



--
Amos Shapir
 
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Moon's phases

Karl Palmen

Dear Amos, Aristeo and Calendar People

 

The Gregorian lunar calendar is not a separate lunar calendar. It relies on the Gregorian calendar to determine the start days of the months. It is part of a lunisolar calendar and not a calendar in its own right. Isaac Newton did consider using a separate lunar calendar similar to my yerm calendar to define Easter.

 

While it is easy to define separate solar and lunar calendars, they are not as easy to use together as an integrated lunisolar calendar. Newton’s calendar would require more calculations or table lookups than Gregorian lunisolar calendar.

 

One interesting point about my yerm calendar is that 3 yerms within a cycle is 14 days short of 4 years with a leap day. So for example, we have yerms in cycle 21 beginning thus:

02: 1998-03-28

05: 2002-03-14

08: 2006-02-28

11: 2010-02-14

14: 2014-01-31

17: 2018-01-17

20: 2022-01-03

Similar would normally apply to Newton’s calendar.

 

Karl

 

16(17(25

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 11 January 2018 07:16
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Moon's phases

 

Hi Aristeo and calendar people,

As a matter of fact, teh Gregorian calendar is such a calendar.  Calculation of moon phases is an integral part of its algorithm; these are used mainly to determine the date of Easter and correlating dates, but it's easy to use it to mark down moon phases all along the year.

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 12:11 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People,

It is hard to make the lunar calendar a solar calendar, and vice versa.  So why not make a separate lunar calendar to a solar calendar, just like now wherein in the Gregorian calendar, the phases of the moon (example, new, first quarter, full, last quarter) are indicated. 

 

Kind regards,

Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."




--

Amos Shapir