Leap year (February 29)

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Leap year (February 29)

Ryan Provost
Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT time).

 

The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years, expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.

 

My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The leap year rule proposal goes as follows......

 

"Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"

 

It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed RyoSystem info.

 

BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the bissextile day. Information at http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50

 

But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas, including Canada and RYAN 3000.)

 

Happy Leap day everybody!
 

RYAN 3000



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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Peter A. Kincaid
I can't help but  note a personal unusual leap year
story.  My wife turns 40 today - being her 10th
birthday.  For a few years, myself and another
woman worked together for this company.  Her
husband who born on the same day, year and
in the same place as my wife.  He has a brother
who was born exactly four years after him - ie.
29 Feb 1972.  How's that for an oddity.

Peter



----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan Provost" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 10:24 PM
Subject: Leap year (February 29)


> Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT
> time).
>
> The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian
> Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years,
> expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.
>
> My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The
> leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
>
> "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years
> divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of
> (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
>
> It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part
> of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email
> will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed
> RyoSystem info.
>
> BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The
> Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the
> bissextile day. Information at
> http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
>
> But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe,
> Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas,
> including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
>
> Happy Leap day everybody!
>
> RYAN 3000
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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Peter Zilahy Ingerman, PhD
In reply to this post by Ryan Provost
I note that Ryan does not give credit to Rommé, who proposed the same "correction" to the French Republican calendar some two centuries earlier.

Pzed

Ryan Provost wrote:
Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT time).

 

The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years, expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.

 

My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The leap year rule proposal goes as follows......

 

"Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"

 

It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed RyoSystem info.

 

BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the bissextile day. Information at http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50

 

But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas, including Canada and RYAN 3000.)

 

Happy Leap day everybody!
 

RYAN 3000



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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Tom Peters-4
In reply to this post by Ryan Provost
Op 29-feb-2008, om 3:24 heeft Ryan Provost het volgende geschreven:

> Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today  
> (GMT time).
> The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the  
> Gregorian Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year  
> every 4 years, expect when century years are leap years every 400  
> years.
>
Wrong (apart from typo expect -> except?): ..., except century years  
that are not divisible by 400.
>  My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear  
> system..... The leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
>
>  "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century  
> (Ryo)Years divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by  
> 4000 with the of (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
>
You say that you will drop 1 leap day every 400 years, which will  
give a mean year length of 365.2475 .  Also your statement "except  
when ... millennia years divisible by 4000 .." is superfluous because  
implicit in your 400-year rule.  And that does not give the mean year  
length that you specify.

But I suppose you propose a rule like: 365 + 1/4 -1/100 + 1/400 -  
1/4000 = 365.24225 .  This has been proposed centuries ago, as P.Z.  
Ingerman already pointed out; and there is no good reason to  
implement such a change to the Gregorian rule.  Also there is no good  
reason to start a new era in 2000 CE, especially not one named after  
yourself.
> BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net 
> about "The Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once  
> called the bissextile day. Information at http://
> decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?
> s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
>
Correct.  The Catholic Church used to celebrate the feast of  
St.Matthias a day later in leap years; see e.g. http://
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year
>  But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in  
> Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow  
> in the Americas, including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
>
Today is the leap DAY (in current counting of month days), not the  
leap YEAR.

Sloppy formulations, peppered with self-aggrandizing adjectives.  Go  
annoy people elsewhere!

--
   Tom Peters
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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Irv Bromberg
In reply to this post by Ryan Provost
On Feb 28, 2008, at 21:24, Ryan Provost wrote:
> "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century
> (Ryo)Years divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000
> with the of (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"

Irv replies:

This proposed leap cycle, like the Gregorian calendar, has a wide range
of equinox wobble, because the leap years are not spread as uniformly
as possible.

365.24225 days = 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes and about 50.4 seconds.

Let's check:

4000 years of 365 days = 1460000 days not counting leap days.
/4 = +1000 leap days, not yet accounting for centuries or millennia.
deduct 4000/400 = 10 non-leap centurial years that are divisible by 400
deduct one non-leap millennial year divisible by 4000,
total days in 4000-year cycle = 1460000+1000-10-1 = 1460989 days.
Calculate mean year by dividing by 4000 = 365 days + 989/4000 day =
365.24725 days, rather substantially longer than the figure claimed by
Ryan!

To recheck the mean year, calculate the fraction in excess by 365 days
by simply adding up the number of leap days in the cycle and dividing
by the number of years in the cycle.

=1000-10-1 = 989/4000, corresponding to a calendar mean year that is
365 days 5 hours 56 minutes and about 2.4 seconds, much, much too long.

Rechecking Ryan's leap statement, it seems that it contains several
errors, even ignoring the spelling errors ("expect" when "except" was
intended).
He MEANT to say that the centurial years divisible by 400 are leap
years, but all other centurial years are NOT leap years.
And I assume that the years divisible by 4000, which would be leap
years because they are divisible by 400, are NOT leap years according
to his millennial rule.
Recalculating the number of leap days in the cycle = 1000 - 30 - 1 =
365+969/4000 = 365.24225 days as originally claimed by Ryan.

He didn't state what his calendar rule is intended to align with.  If
it is the northward equinox then his calendar mean year is almost 10
seconds too short, although it is better to be too short than too long
(the mean year of the Gregorian calendar is 12 seconds too long).  If
it is the "mean tropical year" then it is about right (subject to the
controversy about what is meant by the MTY and how to calculate it),
but calendars should generally relate to a specific equinox or
solstice.

The northward equinoctial mean year will be reasonably stable for about
another 4 millennia, then it will get progressively shorter, see
<http://www.sym454.org/seasons/>.
This means that Ryan's year 4000 correction will be invoked exactly
once before it is no longer sufficient to correct the drift of the
calendar!
It is "too little, too late"!


On Feb 29, 2008, at 08:48, Peter Zilahy Ingerman, PhD wrote:
>  I note that Ryan does not give credit to Rommé, who proposed the same
> "correction" to the French Republican calendar some two centuries
> earlier.

The FRC was intended to align with the southward equinox.

Two centuries ago, the mean southward equinoctial year was 365 days 5
hours 48 minutes and about 34 seconds or about 365.2420621 days, quite
a bit shorter than the 365.24225 days of the leap rule in question.  
Since then it has got progressively shorter (presently about
365.24201096 days or 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes and less than 30
seconds) and will continue to shorten until approximately year 6000.

So Rommé's suggestion made substantially LESS sense for the FRC.  In
his case it was even worse, if the 4-millennium correction would not
even be invoked until 4000 years after the French Revolution!  
Apparently at the time it wasn't realized that the mean southward
equinoctial year was already substantially shorter than the mean
northward equinoctial year, and the former was (and is) rapidly getting
shorter while the latter remains relatively stable (for about the next
4 millennia).

If one is unwilling to go all the way to an astronomical or mean
astronomical calendar, then at least use a uniformly spread fixed
arithmetic leap rule, which will best approximate the target astronomy
with minimum equinox or solstice wobble.  Ideally the number of years
per cycle should be <1000.  In the case of the southward equinox or
south solstice, in the present era it is better to to use a progressive
leap rule (such as LASEY or LASSY, see <http://www.sym454.org/leap/>),
because their mean years are both rapidly getting shorter.

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

<http://www.sym454.org/>
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ALL Years with February 29th RE: Leap year (February 29)

Brij Bhushan Vij
In reply to this post by Peter Zilahy Ingerman, PhD
Pzed & CC, sirs:
In my proposal for Reform of the Gregorian calendar, I place FEbruary 29th EVERY YEAR, at the cost of July 31st (i.e. shifting this day to February). Keeping December 31st as the World Peace Day the calendar months generally follow Keplers' Laws of Planetary motion in four equal quarters. Please see: http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_cal-reform-anewWrld-calendar.pdf. The calendar may be used with or without Leap days (div.4/skip128th) or with Leap Weeks (div.6) using either option: 896-yrs/159 LWks [2688-yrs/477 LWks] or 834-yrs/148 LWks.
My proposal in brief is palced at: http://www.brijvij.com/bb_wrld-cal.Nu-app..pdf
Improvements on my proposals, see my home page: http://www.brijvij.com/ are welcome.
Regards,
Brij Bhushan Vij 
(MJD 2454528)/995+D-049W09-00 (G. Sunday, 2008 March 02 H 08:71(decimal) IST
Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah -Rg Veda
Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30
Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep:30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30
(365th day of Year is World Day)
HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar*****
"Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti, purshaarth karne mein hai"
Contact # 011-9818775933 (M)
001(201)962-3708(when in US)



Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 08:48:48 -0500
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
To: [hidden email]

I note that Ryan does not give credit to Rommé, who proposed the same "correction" to the French Republican calendar some two centuries earlier.

Pzed

Ryan Provost wrote:
Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT time).
 
The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years, expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.
 
My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
 
"Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
 
It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed RyoSystem info.
 
BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the bissextile day. Information at http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
 
But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas, including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
 
Happy Leap day everybody!
 
RYAN 3000


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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Amos Shapir
In reply to this post by Peter A. Kincaid
I have read an article in a paper about this date, claiming that in some countries (UK?) this was the only date women could propose to men.
 
There is an article on the BBC site which claims that this should be a holiday for people on yearly or monthly salaries:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7269816.stm
 
Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years, which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of Adar on non-leap years has only 29 days.  This year it will fall on next Friday, March 7.
It used to fall on Feb.29 once in 76 years (not regularly, because of dependence on week days); unfortunately the last time this had happened was in 1824 and it's not going to happen again any more.

Amos Shapir
 





> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 00:54:51 -0400

> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
> To: [hidden email]
>
> I can't help but note a personal unusual leap year
> story. My wife turns 40 today - being her 10th
> birthday. For a few years, myself and another
> woman worked together for this company. Her
> husband who born on the same day, year and
> in the same place as my wife. He has a brother
> who was born exactly four years after him - ie.
> 29 Feb 1972. How's that for an oddity.
>
> Peter
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ryan Provost" <[hidden email]>
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 10:24 PM
> Subject: Leap year (February 29)
>
>
> > Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT
> > time).
> >
> > The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian
> > Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years,
> > expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.
> >
> > My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The
> > leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
> >
> > "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years
> > divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of
> > (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
> >
> > It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part
> > of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email
> > will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed
> > RyoSystem info.
> >
> > BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The
> > Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the
> > bissextile day. Information at
> > http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
> >
> > But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe,
> > Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas,
> > including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
> >
> > Happy Leap day everybody!
> >
> > RYAN 3000



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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Mark J. Reed-2
On Sun, Mar 2, 2008 at 10:54 AM, Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I have read an article in a paper about this date, claiming that in some
> countries (UK?) this was the only date women could propose to men.

I think this was traditional across Europe, but certainly in the US as
well.  It was still a well-known tradition here into the 1960's.

>  Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years,
> which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of Adar
> on non-leap years has only 29 days.  This year it will fall on next Friday,
> March 7.

It seems like in a lunisolar calendar like the Hebrew you have a lot
of days that aren't there every year: the 30th day of months that are
sometimes hollow and sometimes full, such as (Mark)heshvan and Kislev.
 Not to mention the entire 13th month - it's not just Adar 30th that's
missing in common years, but all of Adar II.



--
Mark J. Reed <[hidden email]>
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Re: Leap year (February 29)

John Dalziel
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir

Yes that’s true for the UK. My wife proposed to me on the 29th of Feb 2000. We’ve been married 7 years but only celebrated the engagement three times.

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 02 March 2008 15:54
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)

 

I have read an article in a paper about this date, claiming that in some countries (UK?) this was the only date women could propose to men.
 
There is an article on the BBC site which claims that this should be a holiday for people on yearly or monthly salaries:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7269816.stm
 
Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years, which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of Adar on non-leap years has only 29 days.  This year it will fall on next Friday, March 7.
It used to fall on Feb.29 once in 76 years (not regularly, because of dependence on week days); unfortunately the last time this had happened was in 1824 and it's not going to happen again any more.

Amos Shapir
 




> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 00:54:51 -0400
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
> To: [hidden email]
>
> I can't help but note a personal unusual leap year
> story. My wife turns 40 today - being her 10th
> birthday. For a few years, myself and another
> woman worked together for this company. Her
> husband who born on the same day, year and
> in the same place as my wife. He has a brother
> who was born exactly four years after him - ie.
> 29 Feb 1972. How's that for an oddity.
>
> Peter
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ryan Provost" <[hidden email]>
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 10:24 PM
> Subject: Leap year (February 29)
>
>
> > Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT
> > time).
> >
> > The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian
> > Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years,
> > expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.
> >
> > My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The
> > leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
> >
> > "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years
> > divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of
> > (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
> >
> > It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part
> > of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email
> > will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed
> > RyoSystem info.
> >
> > BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The
> > Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the
> > bissextile day. Information at
> > http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
> >
> > But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe,
> > Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas,
> > including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
> >
> > Happy Leap day everybody!
> >
> > RYAN 3000


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AW: Leap year (February 29)

Michael Klemm-2
John Dalziel  wrote:

> Yes that's true for the UK. My wife proposed to me on the 29th of Feb
> 2000. We've been married 7 years but only celebrated the engagement three
> times.

Why not celebrate this event after every 365 days and 6 hours?

Regards
Michael
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Re: AW: Leap year (February 29)

John Dalziel
Hmmm. Not sure I'm capable of celebrating anything at 6am!



On 2 Mar 2008, at 19:17, Michael Klemm wrote:

> John Dalziel  wrote:
>
>> Yes that's true for the UK. My wife proposed to me on the 29th of Feb
>> 2000. We've been married 7 years but only celebrated the  
>> engagement three
>> times.
>
> Why not celebrate this event after every 365 days and 6 hours?
>
> Regards
> Michael
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Re: AW: Leap year (February 29)

Mark J. Reed-2
On Sun, Mar 2, 2008 at 3:30 PM, John Dalziel <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  Why not celebrate this event after every 365 days and 6 hours?

Too much math for most people.

Not that the folks on this list qualify as "most people" in any way,
manner, shape or form. :)



--
Mark J. Reed <[hidden email]>
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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Brij Bhushan Vij
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir
Amos, sir & all:
I have discussed my views since 2002 for the possibility of A World Calendar (with or without) Leap Weeks. Perhaps mine is the ONLY proposal that allows Leap Weeks on divide by six(6) with Additional Keplers' Leap Weeks.
I take liberty of posting gist of my previous mail, sir (as ready reference):
"In my proposal for Reform of the Gregorian calendar, I place FEbruary 29th EVERY YEAR, at the cost of July 31st (i.e. shifting this day to February). Keeping December 31st as the World Peace Day the calendar months generally follow Keplers' Laws of Planetary motion in four equal quarters. Please see: http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_cal-reform-anewWrld-calendar.pdf. The calendar may be used with or without Leap days (div.4/skip128th) or with Leap Weeks (div.6) using either option: 896-yrs/159 LWks [2688-yrs/477 LWks] or 834-yrs/148 LWks.
My proposal in brief is palced at: http://www.brijvij.com/bb_wrld-cal.Nu-app..pdf
Improvements on my proposals, see my home page: http://www.brijvij.com/ are welcome".
Regards,
Brij Bhushan Vij      (MJD 2454528)/995+D-049W09-00 (G. Sunday, 2008 March 02 H 08:71(decimal) IST

Brij Bhushan Vij
(MJD 2454529)/995+D-50W09-01 (G. Monday, 2008 March 03 H 19:66(decimal) IST
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Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 17:54:02 +0200
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
To: [hidden email]

I have read an article in a paper about this date, claiming that in some countries (UK?) this was the only date women could propose to men.
 
There is an article on the BBC site which claims that this should be a holiday for people on yearly or monthly salaries:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7269816.stm
 
Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years, which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of Adar on non-leap years has only 29 days.  This year it will fall on next Friday, March 7.
It used to fall on Feb.29 once in 76 years (not regularly, because of dependence on week days); unfortunately the last time this had happened was in 1824 and it's not going to happen again any more.

Amos Shapir
 





> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 00:54:51 -0400
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
> To: [hidden email]
>
> I can't help but note a personal unusual leap year
> story. My wife turns 40 today - being her 10th
> birthday. For a few years, myself and another
> woman worked together for this company. Her
> husband who born on the same day, year and
> in the same place as my wife. He has a brother
> who was born exactly four years after him - ie.
> 29 Feb 1972. How's that for an oddity.
>
> Peter
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ryan Provost" <[hidden email]>
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 10:24 PM
> Subject: Leap year (February 29)
>
>
> > Well, as you know, 2008 is a leap year and the leap year is today (GMT
> > time).
> >
> > The Julian Calendar have the leap year every 4 years, while the Gregorian
> > Calendar have the leap year rule via having the leap year every 4 years,
> > expect when century years are leap years every 400 years.
> >
> > My new system goes a step further called the RyoLeapYear system..... The
> > leap year rule proposal goes as follows......
> >
> > "Every RyoLeapYears are divisible by 4 expect when the century (Ryo)Years
> > divisible by 400 and millennia (Ryo)Years divisible by 4000 with the of
> > (Ryo)Year being 365.24225 days"
> >
> > It is part of the RyoSystem, which is described in the RyoLeapYears part
> > of the Ryosystem via http://rynprov.ueuo.com/ryosystem.php. Another email
> > will describe the RyoSystem in brief and the link to the detailed
> > RyoSystem info.
> >
> > BTW, I heard on the DT website via http://decimaltime.hynes.net about "The
> > Real Leap Day" which was on the 24th of February, once called the
> > bissextile day. Information at
> > http://decimaltime.hynes.net/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=ad1f4f4caca4ce227b7e41481b1e5806;act=ST;f=11;t=50
> >
> > But actually, the leap year is on 2008.02.29 (which is today in Europe,
> > Africa, Asia, Australia and the Middle east, and tomorrow in the Americas,
> > including Canada and RYAN 3000.)
> >
> > Happy Leap day everybody!
> >
> > RYAN 3000



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Re: Leap year (February 29)

OvV_HN
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir
Amos Shapir wrote:
....

> Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years,
> which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of
> Adar on non-leap years has only 29 days.  This year it will fall on next
> Friday, March 7.
> It used to fall on Feb.29 once in 76 years (not regularly, because of
> dependence on week days); unfortunately the last time this had happened
> was in 1824 and it's not going to happen again any more.

Strictly speaking: wrong & wrong!

The last couple of times it occurred was:

Hebr.yr     Greg.yr   diff in
Adar I 30   Feb. 29   Greg. yrs.
---------   -------   ---------
5136        1376
5204        1444       68
5212        1452        8
5280        1520       68
5356        1596       76
5508        1748      152
5584        1824       76
Note: before 1584 the proleptic Gregorian calendar is used.
So, there is no strict 76 year cycle.

The next time it will occur is in the Hebrew year 83267, which coincides
with Gregorian 79508.
Of course it may be doubted whether humanity will still exist by then,
but algorithmically the Hebrew calendar will eventually shift past every
Gregorian date.
Starting Hebrew year 83267 a string of 45 coincidences will occur, the
last one being in the Hebrew year 90191, coinciding with Gregorian
86432. Then a long time no coincidences, until the Hebrew year 167570,
Gregorian 163812, with another string of 41 years.

Still no strict 76 year cycle. On from Hebrew 83267, Gregorian 79508,
the following couple of Gregorian year differences with the previous
occurrence can be found:
524, 144, 8, 220, 76, 68, 76, 144, 8, 76, 68, 152, 68, 84, 220, ....

For the calculations I used the very robust algorithms from
Reingold/Dershowitz.
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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Amos Shapir
Well, the first "wrong" is wrong because I wasn't speaking strictly anyway, it was indicated that this was NOT a regular cycle (even though between 1444 and 1824 only one 76th year was missed).  The second "wrong" is most likely wrong, because the Jewish calendar is supposed to be tied to the seasons, so it will have to be reformed before it drifts a full circle.

Amos Shapir
 





> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 15:48:52 +0100

> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Amos Shapir wrote:
> ....
>
> > Such a date also exists on the Jewish calendar: 30 Adar 1 on leap years,
> > which repeats 7 times over a 19 year cycle, since the regular month of
> > Adar on non-leap years has only 29 days. This year it will fall on next
> > Friday, March 7.
> > It used to fall on Feb.29 once in 76 years (not regularly, because of
> > dependence on week days); unfortunately the last time this had happened
> > was in 1824 and it's not going to happen again any more.
>
> Strictly speaking: wrong & wrong!
>
> The last couple of times it occurred was:
>
> Hebr.yr Greg.yr diff in
> Adar I 30 Feb. 29 Greg. yrs.
> --------- ------- ---------
> 5136 1376
> 5204 1444 68
> 5212 1452 8
> 5280 1520 68
> 5356 1596 76
> 5508 1748 152
> 5584 1824 76
> Note: before 1584 the proleptic Gregorian calendar is used.
> So, there is no strict 76 year cycle.
>
> The next time it will occur is in the Hebrew year 83267, which coincides
> with Gregorian 79508.
> Of course it may be doubted whether humanity will still exist by then,
> but algorithmically the Hebrew calendar will eventually shift past every
> Gregorian date.
> Starting Hebrew year 83267 a string of 45 coincidences will occur, the
> last one being in the Hebrew year 90191, coinciding with Gregorian
> 86432. Then a long time no coincidences, until the Hebrew year 167570,
> Gregorian 163812, with another string of 41 years.
>
> Still no strict 76 year cycle. On from Hebrew 83267, Gregorian 79508,
> the following couple of Gregorian year differences with the previous
> occurrence can be found:
> 524, 144, 8, 220, 76, 68, 76, 144, 8, 76, 68, 152, 68, 84, 220, ....
>
> For the calculations I used the very robust algorithms from
> Reingold/Dershowitz.



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Re: Leap year (February 29)

Mark J. Reed-2
In reply to this post by OvV_HN
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 9:48 AM, OvV_HN <[hidden email]> wrote:

>  Hebr.yr     Greg.yr   diff in
>  Adar I 30   Feb. 29   Greg. yrs.
>  ---------   -------   ---------
>  5136        1376
>  5204        1444       68
>  5212        1452        8
>  5280        1520       68
>  5356        1596       76
>  5508        1748      152
>  5584        1824       76
>  Note: before 1584 the proleptic Gregorian calendar is used.
>  So, there is no strict 76 year cycle.

No, though  there is clearly a 76-year component. There's a 76-year
period from 1376 to 1452, if you discount the intervening recurrence
in 1444; likewise 1444 to 1520 if you instead discount 1452; and of
course, the 152-year gap is just two 76-year gaps back to back.

If you compare to the Julian Feb 29 instead, the correspondence is
more consistent going forward. The last dual-leap-day was AM 5716/1956
CE, and the next one is AM 5792/2032 CE, and they continue to occur
with 9 more this millennium and 8 each in the next two millennia,
rather than stopping until the 796th century CE.

--
Mark J. Reed <[hidden email]>
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Lunisolar/Gregorian dates RE: Leap year (February 29)

Palmen, KEV (Karl)
In reply to this post by OvV_HN
Dear Amos and Calendar People

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of OvV_HN
Sent: 03 March 2008 14:49
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)


The last couple of times it occurred was:

Hebr.yr     Greg.yr   diff in
Adar I 30   Feb. 29   Greg. yrs.
---------   -------   ---------
5136        1376
5204        1444       68
5212        1452        8
5280        1520       68
5356        1596       76
5508        1748      152
5584        1824       76
Note: before 1584 the proleptic Gregorian calendar is used.
So, there is no strict 76 year cycle.

KARL SAYS: Most of these years
Not only follow a 76-year cycle, but also have Gregorian numbers
divisible by 76. This applies to 1444 (=19*76), 1520 (=20*76), 1596
(=21*76), 1748 (=23*76), 1824 (=24*76).

Another curiosity is years that have a particular very early or very
late Easter day such as March 23 for this year, which is 95 years after
the previous and 152 years before the next.

Karl

09(08(26 till noon
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More silly Easter stats

OvV_HN
Palmen, KEV (Karl) wrote:
> Another curiosity is years that have a particular very early or very
> late Easter day such as March 23 for this year, which is 95 years after
> the previous and 152 years before the next.

Easter statistics can be quite entertaining. Some more:

In the Gregorian calendar, the years with Easter Sunday on March 22 (the
earliest date) are -- calculation started with 1583:
1598, 1693, 1761, 1818, 2285, 2353, 2437, 2505, 2972, 3029, 3401, 3496,
3564, ...

Orthodox Easter in the Julian calendar, falling on March 22, occurs
since the year 325 in the Julian years:
414, 509, 604, 851, 946, 1041, 1136, 1383, 1478, 1573, 1668, 1915, 2010,
2105, 2200, 2447, 2542, 2637, 2732, 2979, 3074, 3169, 3264, 3511, 3606, ...

Now there is a fine periodicity in the differences between these years.
In the Julian calendar these differences have a periodicity of 247, 95,
95, 95 years.
Note that other Easter dates have another periodicity, for instance
March 23 has a difference-periodicity of 163, 84, 11, 84, 11, 84, 11, 84
years.

In the Gregorian calendar however, there is no obvious periodicity.
There could be a long one, but the whole canon of Easter dates is only
5.7 million years long.
I investigated the Gregorian Easter dates between the years 1583 and 1
million (5701583 would be needed for a full period length).
I found that the maximum difference between two years with Easter on
March 22 is 1887 years, namely for the first time between the years
171812 and 173699.
Between now and the year 10000 the maximum is 991 years, between the
years 4308 and 5299.
The differences are not always odd; there are also even differences, for
instance of 68, 84, 152, 220, 372, 524, 592, 896 years.

All this nonsense can probably easily be derived with some advanced
modulo arithmetics. You could harass your students, if you have any,
with this kind of exercises!
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Re: Lunisolar/Gregorian dates RE: Leap year (February 29)

HR-CALNDR-L
In reply to this post by Palmen, KEV (Karl)
76 = 4 * 19;
do you reconise some well known numbers?

_________________________________________________
Kind regards / met vriendelijke groeten,

Henk Reints



> Dear Amos and Calendar People
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of OvV_HN
> Sent: 03 March 2008 14:49
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Leap year (February 29)
>
>
> The last couple of times it occurred was:
>
> Hebr.yr     Greg.yr   diff in
> Adar I 30   Feb. 29   Greg. yrs.
> ---------   -------   ---------
> 5136        1376
> 5204        1444       68
> 5212        1452        8
> 5280        1520       68
> 5356        1596       76
> 5508        1748      152
> 5584        1824       76
> Note: before 1584 the proleptic Gregorian calendar is used.
> So, there is no strict 76 year cycle.
>
> KARL SAYS: Most of these years
> Not only follow a 76-year cycle, but also have Gregorian numbers
> divisible by 76. This applies to 1444 (=19*76), 1520 (=20*76), 1596
> (=21*76), 1748 (=23*76), 1824 (=24*76).
>
> Another curiosity is years that have a particular very early or very
> late Easter day such as March 23 for this year, which is 95 years after
> the previous and 152 years before the next.
>
> Karl
>
> 09(08(26 till noon
>
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Re: More silly Easter stats

Palmen, KEV (Karl)
In reply to this post by OvV_HN
Dear Calendar People

The Golden number of the years listed as having Easter on March 22 are
as follows (with golden number on left):

03:   1598 1693
14:   1761 1818  
06:   2285 2437
17:   2353 2505
09:   2972 3029
01:   3401 3496
12:   3564

Between years with the same golden number, intervals are 95, 57, 152,
152, 57, 95 .

Years of the same Golden number seem to always come in pairs. When is
this not the case?

Intervals between the rows are 68, 467, -84, 467, 372, 68.

Note that the interval 2353 jumps back a row to 2437 forming the
interval of -84 between those rows. The interval 2437 to 2505 is a
68-year interval as is the interval 2285 to 2353. This jumping back (of
2353 to 2437) arose as a result of compensation for the abundance of
leap years from 2304 to 2496 inclusive.

Karl

09(08(29

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of OvV_HN
Sent: 04 March 2008 14:24
To: [hidden email]
Subject: More silly Easter stats

Palmen, KEV (Karl) wrote:
> Another curiosity is years that have a particular very early or very
> late Easter day such as March 23 for this year, which is 95 years
> after the previous and 152 years before the next.

Easter statistics can be quite entertaining. Some more:

In the Gregorian calendar, the years with Easter Sunday on March 22 (the
earliest date) are -- calculation started with 1583:
1598, 1693, 1761, 1818, 2285, 2353, 2437, 2505, 2972, 3029, 3401, 3496,
3564, ...

Orthodox Easter in the Julian calendar, falling on March 22, occurs
since the year 325 in the Julian years:
414, 509, 604, 851, 946, 1041, 1136, 1383, 1478, 1573, 1668, 1915, 2010,
2105, 2200, 2447, 2542, 2637, 2732, 2979, 3074, 3169, 3264, 3511, 3606,
...

Now there is a fine periodicity in the differences between these years.
In the Julian calendar these differences have a periodicity of 247, 95,
95, 95 years.
Note that other Easter dates have another periodicity, for instance
March 23 has a difference-periodicity of 163, 84, 11, 84, 11, 84, 11, 84
years.

In the Gregorian calendar however, there is no obvious periodicity.
There could be a long one, but the whole canon of Easter dates is only
5.7 million years long.
I investigated the Gregorian Easter dates between the years 1583 and 1
million (5701583 would be needed for a full period length).
I found that the maximum difference between two years with Easter on
March 22 is 1887 years, namely for the first time between the years
171812 and 173699.
Between now and the year 10000 the maximum is 991 years, between the
years 4308 and 5299.
The differences are not always odd; there are also even differences, for
instance of 68, 84, 152, 220, 372, 524, 592, 896 years.

All this nonsense can probably easily be derived with some advanced
modulo arithmetics. You could harass your students, if you have any,
with this kind of exercises!