Kali Years RE: Regret Re: Placing Leap Days Re: Metric Calendar Year Re: To the list.

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Kali Years RE: Regret Re: Placing Leap Days Re: Metric Calendar Year Re: To the list.

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
Dear Brij (in private)

Thank you for letting me know. The important issue for me that I wanted to share with the list, was not when the leap days occur, but whether the leap day belongs to a 'decaday' or is a blank day. I think it is a blank day, else the double-years would not begin on the same day (Sunday) of the 'decaday'. This is an important issue and is related to the issue on the calendar list about the 5 or 6 epagomenal days being blank days.


I've become curious about the Kali year numbers. They appear to be half the Kali Yuga year numbers (from early 3102 BC = -3101 CE), so could number the double-years. I reckon the Kali Yuga year number for most of 1974 to be 5076. Half of this is 2538 rather than 2544.

Also I'm curious about why you started the double-year on December 23. Perhaps, it has something to do with the December solstice.
If the double-years were based on Kali Yuga, they would begin about a month later on January 24 if Gregorian leap days were used, but about a day or two earlier if 128-year cycle leap days were used.

Note that the February 18 date is in the proleptic Julian calendar, which in 3102 BC was 25 days ahead of the proleptic Gregorian calendar. Proleptic means that the calendar was not yet in use at the time.


I took the liberty of doing some calculations for the Kali Yuga era:

If we start double-year 1 at this epoch, then double-year 2537 (2536 double-years later) would begin on February 18, 1971 - 39 = January 10, 1971 in the Julian calendar, which is January 23, 1971 in the Gregorian calendar. The 39 comes from 2536/64 = 39.625.

Double-year 2537 has no leap day, because its number is odd, but 1972 does have a leap day, so double-year 2538 would begin on January 22, 1973. The new double-years would then alternate between January 23 & January 22 till this double-year, which is 2560 (began on January 22, 2017). This double-year drops a leap day because 2560 = 64*40. So next double year (2561) would begin on January 22, 2019 and they would then subsequently alternate between 21 & 22 January for the rest of this century.

Karl

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Sent: 12 April 2018 17:51
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Regret Re: Placing Leap Days Re: Metric Calendar Year Re: To the list.

(In Private)
Karl, sir:
SAD. This slip had not been pointed for correction; and I presumed that it shall be automatically assumed to follow ‘Gregorian Leap Accounting’, and my concentration remained on its “Format”.
Regards,
Brij Vij
Thursday, 2018 April 12H12:85(decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 12, 2018, at 12:04 PM, Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Dear Brij and Calendar People
>
> Thank you Brij for your reply.
>
> I take it that Brij did not consider leap days when he made this calendar, even though about four or more of them occurred between the year shown and when the calendar was abandoned in the 1990s.
>
> Brij did not make it clear whether the leap day belongs to his 10-day week, having not specified whether the first day of the next year is a Sunday. I think every year begins with a Sunday of his 'decaday' and so the leap day does not belong to any 'decaday' and so interrupts the 10-day 'decaday' cycle.
>
> Thus the pairing of the years does not stop the 10-day cycle from being interrupted, but makes the interruption less frequent and by just one day.
>
> A closer look at the picture showed that the new year was on December 23.
>
> Karl
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
> Sent: 12 April 2018 13:40
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Placing Leap Days Re: Metric Calendar Year Re: To the list.
>
> Karl, all:
>> ...in his calendar with 73-day 'month's and >10-day week, which he recently showed..
> 10-day Decaday has 2-quinto days, each of 10^6 metric seconds (see my published contribution (1973 April). The 5-day intervals were: (a) Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday; and (b) Sigma-day, Alfa-day, Beta-day, Friday & Saturday.
> Sunday & Sigma-day were proposed ‘No Work Days’ like Sundays.
> What is the point after 50-years,.. ? This had been shelved around 1990’s; and work for other options...already discussed.
> It can be placed, if Karl and the list wish to recommend its implitation, after 73rd ‘decaday’ ie Saturday but before the start of next year - ie Year 2544(Kali), every alternate year of 730-days- till 64 such years are over ie Y 2607(Kali).
> This may mean ‘to follow div.4/skip128’ Rule
> for Gregorian Era caldndar. No point over spilt milk now, since I do not recommend it’s use now in view of my Brij-Gregorian Modified Calendar. It was the FORMAT I pointed, wherefrom I started my tryst - currently it can be in continuation after the death of French Republican Calendar, to last for a mere 13-years.
> Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), Author
> Brij-Gregorian Modified Calendar
> Thursday, 2018 April 12H08:65 (decimal)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 12, 2018, at 7:40 AM, Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Dear Brij and Calendar People
>>
>> I ask Brij what a leap year would look like in his calendar with 73-day 'month's and 10-day week, which he recently showed a picture of for two years spanning 1973-1975.
>>
>> I also ask when does the New Year of this calendar occur for the two years shown?
>>
>> Karl
>>
>> 17(03(27
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
>> Sent: 11 April 2018 17:29
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Re: Metric Calendar Year Re: To the list.
>>
>> Walter, Karl sirs:
>>> Brij would favor a leap day rule that drops >one day in 128 years, which has been >suggested as a rule for that calendar.
>> I thank you Walter.
>> This would also leave a door open to include ‘Year 0000’ in astronomy studies; and mg calculation between Mean Years of 128-year cycle and that between Gregorian/Julian calendars of 1 -day in 3200-years, can be seen: 3200x365.2425=1168776 days;
>>    3200x365.2421875=1168775 Days.
>> This is ‘exactly’ one day for future or past corrections.
>> Ex-Flt LtBrij Bhushan Vij (Retd.), Author
>> Brij-Gregorian Modified Calendar
>> Wednesday, 2018 April 11H12:46(decimal)
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Apr 11, 2018, at 10:09 AM, Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Brij would favor a leap day rule that drops one day in 128 years, which has been suggested as a rule for that calendar