Harder Education Re: [USMA 522] Re: Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System

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Harder Education Re: [USMA 522] Re: Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Martin Vlietstra, Paul Trusten:
>.....Canada after traveling nearly twice the posted speed limit. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Manitoba shared a photo of an officer's radar clocking the driver traveling 168 kmh, the equivalent of 100 mph, in a 100-kph zone. "Didn't realize we use the metric system.
I recall my meeting some US individuals/Organisations pleading to Think Metric, since America was among he first signatory states to sign the 'Conventiin du Metre'. I carry all the sympathy for the unfortunate driver, for paying his hard earned money towards penalty over over speeding.
There is no doubt that he must pay for endangering his life, along with co-passengers, it shall be in god taste for US government to 'award him some refund' for failure of US in not teaching the difference between "meter & metre" and or learning - A metre is the distance between two points and the 'metric system relate to the measurement of quantities/symbols when expressing along with the LENGTH unit metre; so belonging to SI metric Units'.
Drivers education happened to be the 'harder way' - for what he need be blamed to endanger his co-passengers life! Certainly, he deserve to be compensated for his lost 💰-earned the harder way.
Regards,
Ex-Flt.Lt. Brij Bhushan metric VIJ, Author
Brij-Gregorian Modified Rhyme Calendar
Thursday, 2017 May 4H13:74 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 4, 2017, at 12:23 PM, Martin Vlietstra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I have certainly driven at 100 mph legally! When I was showing my wife what it was like on a short stretch of the autobahn between my son's army camp at Elmpt and the Dutch border, I slowed down when we got to the border and lo and behold, as we approached the Dutch town of Roermond there was a sign proclaiming a "100" speed limit.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: USMA [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of [hidden email]
> Sent: 04 May 2017 19:51
> To: USMA List Server
> Subject: [USMA 521] Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System
>
> May 3 (UPI) -- A North Dakota man, unfamiliar with the metric system, received a $940 speeding ticket in Canada after traveling nearly twice the posted speed limit. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Manitoba shared a photo of an officer's radar clocking the driver traveling 168 kmh, the equivalent of 100 mph, in a 100-kph zone. "Didn't realize we use the metric system. Fined $940," the police department wrote.
>
> RCMP spokesman Sgt. Paul Manaigre told the CBC drivers from the United States are occasionally unaware of Canada's speed measurements, which leads them to drive at excessive speeds unintentionally. "It doesn't surprise me," he said. "I've been policing the Emerson detachment for close to 15 years, so I've caught quite a few speeders...coming over from the States. You don't see it often, but it does occur."
>
> He added the department wasn't likely to hand down dangerous driving charges, but the driver's licence or insurance could be affected back in North Dakota.
>
> May I say:  What ignoramus thinks that a road has a speed of 100 mph?
>
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Re: Harder Education Re: [USMA 522] Re: Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System

Jim Riley-4
The rewrite between the CBC story and the UPI story is interesting:

**********

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/100-mph-not-100-km-h-in-manitoba-1.4094203

A North Dakota resident found out the hard way this past weekend that
kilometres and miles aren't the same thing.

The driver was hit with a $940 ticket Sunday afternoon after being
caught going 100 miles per hour in the RM of Dufferin on Highway 13,
RCMP said.

RCMP's radar gun caught the driver going 168 kilometres per hour, just
over 100 mph, in a 100 km/h zone.

"It's a tad excessive," RCMP spokesperson Sgt. Paul Manaigre said.  

?While dangerous driving charges aren't anticipated, Manaigre said
Manitoba has reciprocity agreements with many states including North
Dakota, meaning the driver's licence or insurance could be affected
back at home.

"It doesn't surprise me," Manaigre told CBC. "I've been policing the
Emerson detachment for close to 15 years, so I've caught quite a few
speeders ... coming over from the States. You don't see it often, but
it does occur."

**********

http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2017/05/03/Americans-metric-error-lands-900-speeding-ticket-in-Canada/4161493840793/

May 3 (UPI) -- A North Dakota man, unfamiliar with the metric system,
received a $940 speeding ticket in Canada after traveling nearly twice
the posted speed limit.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Manitoba shared a photo of an officer's
radar clocking the driver traveling 168 kmh, the equivalent of 100
mph, in a 100-kph zone.

"Didn't realize we use the metric system. Fined $940," the police
department wrote alongside the hashtag #noexcuses.

RCMP spokesman Sgt. Paul Manaigre told the CBC drivers from the United
States are occasionally unaware of Canada's speed measurements, which
leads them to drive at excessive speeds unintentionally.

"It doesn't surprise me," he said. "I've been policing the Emerson
detachment for close to 15 years, so I've caught quite a few
speeders...coming over from the States. You don't see it often, but it
does occur."

He added the department wasn't likely to hand down dangerous driving
charges, but the driver's licence or insurance could be affected back
in North Dakota.

**********

In Canada, the driver was said to not know that kilometres and miles
are not the same. The UPI editor realized that Americans would not
know what a kilometer is, let alone what they had to do with miles,
edited it to be "unfamiliar with the metric" system.

The UPI editor, apparently not familiar with the decimal system, said
that 168 was nearly twice the posted speed limit of 100.

While the CBC noted that 168 km/h was slightly greater than 100 mph,
the UPI said the two per equivalent and used the neologism of kph.

The UPI story removed the comment about the speed being a "tad bit
excessive" and also the explanation about reciprocity agreements. The
UPI story also failed to convert CAD to USD.
--
Jim Riley
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Re: Harder Education Re: [USMA 522] Re: Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System

Ryan
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ

On analog speedometers in cars and motorbikes in US/Canada, speed markings are in km/h AND MPH (analog speedometers in cars/motorbikes UK may also display both units) There must be something in vehicle settings or via button to show the digital speedometer (via MID or digital LED/LCD) in km/h or MPH (and fuel consumption ie MPG, km/L or L/100km, etc) 100 km/h is approx. 60 MPH (62 MPH to be exact rounded to whole unit) so he must slow it down.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: [hidden email]
Sent: May 4, 2017 04:46:28 PM/16:46:28
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Harder Education Re: [USMA 522] Re: Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System

 

Martin Vlietstra, Paul Trusten:
>.....Canada after traveling nearly twice the posted speed limit. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Manitoba shared a photo of an officer's radar clocking the driver traveling 168 kmh, the equivalent of 100 mph, in a 100-kph zone. "Didn't realize we use the metric system.
I recall my meeting some US individuals/Organisations pleading to Think Metric, since America was among he first signatory states to sign the 'Conventiin du Metre'. I carry all the sympathy for the unfortunate driver, for paying his hard earned money towards penalty over over speeding.
There is no doubt that he must pay for endangering his life, along with co-passengers, it shall be in god taste for US government to 'award him some refund' for failure of US in not teaching the difference between "meter & metre" and or learning - A metre is the distance between two points and the 'metric system relate to the measurement of quantities/symbols when expressing along with the LENGTH unit metre; so belonging to SI metric Units'.
Drivers education happened to be the 'harder way' - for what he need be blamed to endanger his co-passengers life! Certainly, he deserve to be compensated for his lost
💰-earned the harder way.
Regards,
Ex-Flt.Lt. Brij Bhushan metric VIJ, Author
Brij-Gregorian Modified Rhyme Calendar
Thursday, 2017 May 4H13:74 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 4, 2017, at 12:23 PM, Martin Vlietstra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I have certainly driven at 100 mph legally! When I was showing my wife what it was like on a short stretch of the autobahn between my son's army camp at Elmpt and the Dutch border, I slowed down when we got to the border and lo and behold, as we approached the Dutch town of Roermond there was a sign proclaiming a "100" speed limit.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: USMA [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of [hidden email]
> Sent: 04 May 2017 19:51
> To: USMA List Server
> Subject: [USMA 521] Canadian Mountie Explains Ignorance of Metric System
>
> May 3 (UPI) -- A North Dakota man, unfamiliar with the metric system, received a $940 speeding ticket in Canada after traveling nearly twice the posted speed limit. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Manitoba shared a photo of an officer's radar clocking the driver traveling 168 kmh, the equivalent of 100 mph, in a 100-kph zone. "Didn't realize we use the metric system. Fined $940," the police department wrote.
>
> RCMP spokesman Sgt. Paul Manaigre told the CBC drivers from the United States are occasionally unaware of Canada's speed measurements, which leads them to drive at excessive speeds unintentionally. "It doesn't surprise me," he said. "I've been policing the Emerson detachment for close to 15 years, so I've caught quite a few speeders...coming over from the States. You don't see it often, but it does occur."
>
> He added the department wasn't likely to hand down dangerous driving charges, but the driver's licence or insurance could be affected back in North Dakota.
>
> May I say:  What ignoramus thinks that a road has a speed of 100 mph?
>
> _______________________________________________
> USMA mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.colostate.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/usma
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> USMA mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.colostate.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/usma