Happy Sidereal New Year

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Happy Sidereal New Year

Walter J Ziobro

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

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Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Walter sir:
To India celebrates festivals marking the dawn of month Baisakh and North India dances to cut their crops their return of laborious 'sowing & growing' - the day being called Baisakhi, Pongal in south, Bihu in Bengals- IN short entire festivities & celebrations marking 'SpringSeason'.
May I wish the entire calendar community Rise of Jesus to mark 'Good Friday & Easter Sunday'. 
Regards, 
Brij Bhudhsn Metric VIj, Author
Brij-Gregorian Modified calendar 
Good Friday, 2017 April 14H15:22 (decimal)

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On Apr 14, 2017, at 10:30 AM, Walter J Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

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Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Karl Palmen
In reply to this post by Walter J Ziobro

Dear Walter, Brij and Calendar People

 

I was thinking when would be an appropriate time to start a sidereal year and I thought that it could be one of the two times that the sun crosses the galactic equator, which runs along the centre of the milky way.

 

Wikipedia gives the galactic poles in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require them in ecliptic coordinates to calculate the two crossing points. Wikipedia does give the constellations of the galactic equator and so indicates that the two points are in the constellations of (Taurus or Gemini) and (Scorpius or Sagittarius).

 

Another possibility is to have the new sidereal year, when the sun is nearest to the galactic centre. Wikipedia gives the location of the galactic centre in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require ecliptic coordinates. The galactic centre is in the constellation of Sagittarius.

 

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactic_coordinate_system

 

Karl

 

16(08(23

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 14 April 2017 18:30
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

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Sidereal,Solar or Metric Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Karl, sirs:
My desire to the Reform of Gregorian calendar was limited to the extent of revision of the format of dates arranged to be of use by men...in order to improve upon the existing 'Black Holes' created deliberately or otherwise to the Astronomers' Mean Year & Mean Lunation values as demonstrated via my calculations, sir. I recall having contributed & published an article earlier.
This obviously is a need for Astronomers or serious students ' to become future Astronomers. I thank you for the information, however.
I came across another value of TITHI=1 339/
326918 day; possibly to study my in depth 
'Examining' my Tithi values: 1 335/326919 day (for 19-years) and 1 338/326919 day for ALL other cycles= No.of days in 896-years/
No.of Tithi in (11082 moons x 29 1/2), I believe, to belong to Indo-Saraswati Basin pointed earlier, sir! Today is America's Patriotic Day; wishing all friends well towards  National cause.
I thank you for understanding my concern.
Regards, 
Brij Bhushan metric VIJ, Author
Brij-Gregorian Modified Calendar
Wednesday, 2017 April 19H07:09 (decimal)

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On Apr 19, 2017, at 5:12 AM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Walter, Brij and Calendar People

 

I was thinking when would be an appropriate time to start a sidereal year and I thought that it could be one of the two times that the sun crosses the galactic equator, which runs along the centre of the milky way.

 

Wikipedia gives the galactic poles in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require them in ecliptic coordinates to calculate the two crossing points. Wikipedia does give the constellations of the galactic equator and so indicates that the two points are in the constellations of (Taurus or Gemini) and (Scorpius or Sagittarius).

 

Another possibility is to have the new sidereal year, when the sun is nearest to the galactic centre. Wikipedia gives the location of the galactic centre in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require ecliptic coordinates. The galactic centre is in the constellation of Sagittarius.

 

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactic_coordinate_system

 

Karl

 

16(08(23

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 14 April 2017 18:30
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

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Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Karl Palmen
Dear Karl:

I have given some consideration to this matter as well.

The point which astronomers identify as the galactic center is called Sagittarius A.  It is actually very close to the currently defined boundary (in equatorial coordinates) of Scorpio and Sagittarius.  I think an ecliptic coordinate system can be made using Sagittarius A as ecliptic longitude Sagittarius 0.  This could then be used to redefine the zodiac.

I believe that dividing the ecliptic into twelve 30 degree arcs from Sagittarius A will cause most of the stars from each of the traditional zodiac constellations to fall within a common arc, and such longitudes could be the boundaries of the 12 zodiac constellations defined in ecliptic coordinates. These redefined ecliptic zodiac constellations could then be the basis of a new sidereal calendar, which could have 12 months named after the traditional zodiac constellations, each month of which would commence on or about the day when the sun crosses each of the 30 degree ecliptic points. 

A luni-solar sidereal calendar could be made as well, with an intercalary month added whenever two full moons occur while the moon is in the same ecliptic zodiac constellation.

However, one point about the galactic center:  given that the sun is moving around the galactic center in an orbit the takes between 225 and 250 million years (which period is sometimes called a galactic year), the galactic center is slowing shifting against the background of more distant galaxies and objects from our perspective. 

A true sidereal calendar might have to make reference to what is called by astronomers the International Celestial Reference Frame.   This is an agreed upon selection (by astronomers) of extremely distant objects, usually quasars, of about 295 radio sources, that are used to define the positions of closer objects because they are so vastly distant from us that they are virtually stationary from our perspective for an extremely long period of time. A sidereal calendar might have to select one of these objects as the reference point to track the length of the galactic year, by referencing the motion of the galactic center against that more distant reference point.

However, one good point about using the galactic center as the reference point for a sidereal calendar is that all the other visible stars that we group into constellations are also moving relative to the center, and, thus, the currently common constellations will "hold on to" most of the stars which we now assign to them..  Of course, some stars exhibit faster proper motion than others, and will "escape" from their traditional constellations sooner than others.  Alas, this is unavoidable, but will thankfully not happen to any visible degree for quite a while.

-Walter  Ziobro



-----Original Message-----
From: Karl Palmen <[hidden email]>
To: CALNDR-L <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wed, Apr 19, 2017 8:12 am
Subject: Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Dear Walter, Brij and Calendar People
 
I was thinking when would be an appropriate time to start a sidereal year and I thought that it could be one of the two times that the sun crosses the galactic equator, which runs along the centre of the milky way.
 
Wikipedia gives the galactic poles in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require them in ecliptic coordinates to calculate the two crossing points. Wikipedia does give the constellations of the galactic equator and so indicates that the two points are in the constellations of (Taurus or Gemini) and (Scorpius or Sagittarius).
 
Another possibility is to have the new sidereal year, when the sun is nearest to the galactic centre. Wikipedia gives the location of the galactic centre in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require ecliptic coordinates. The galactic centre is in the constellation of Sagittarius.
 
 
Karl
 
16(08(23
 
 
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 14 April 2017 18:30
To: CALNDR-[hidden email]
Subject: Happy Sidereal New Year
 
Happy Sidereal New Year
April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars
Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
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Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Karl Palmen

Dear Walter and Calendar People

 

WALTER SAID:

However, one point about the galactic center:  given that the sun is moving around the galactic center in an orbit the takes between 225 and 250 million years (which period is sometimes called a galactic year), the galactic center is slowing shifting against the background of more distant galaxies and objects from our perspective. 

 

KARL REPLIES:

This is one reason why I first considered first the points where the sun crosses the galactic equator, which Walter has not commented about. This is defined by the direction of the intersection line of the galactic and ecliptic planes. Another reason that the relevant points lie on the ecliptic, whereas the galactic centre and the radio sources mentioned will be off the ecliptic.

 

To be able to define a new year for any of the suggestions, we need the relevant points in ecliptic coordinates rather than equatorial coordinates.

 

Karl

 

16(08(24

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 20 April 2017 04:40
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Dear Karl:

I have given some consideration to this matter as well.

The point which astronomers identify as the galactic center is called Sagittarius A.  It is actually very close to the currently defined boundary (in equatorial coordinates) of Scorpio and Sagittarius.  I think an ecliptic coordinate system can be made using Sagittarius A as ecliptic longitude Sagittarius 0.  This could then be used to redefine the zodiac.

I believe that dividing the ecliptic into twelve 30 degree arcs from Sagittarius A will cause most of the stars from each of the traditional zodiac constellations to fall within a common arc, and such longitudes could be the boundaries of the 12 zodiac constellations defined in ecliptic coordinates. These redefined ecliptic zodiac constellations could then be the basis of a new sidereal calendar, which could have 12 months named after the traditional zodiac constellations, each month of which would commence on or about the day when the sun crosses each of the 30 degree ecliptic points. 

A luni-solar sidereal calendar could be made as well, with an intercalary month added whenever two full moons occur while the moon is in the same ecliptic zodiac constellation.

However, one point about the galactic center:  given that the sun is moving around the galactic center in an orbit the takes between 225 and 250 million years (which period is sometimes called a galactic year), the galactic center is slowing shifting against the background of more distant galaxies and objects from our perspective. 

A true sidereal calendar might have to make reference to what is called by astronomers the International Celestial Reference Frame.   This is an agreed upon selection (by astronomers) of extremely distant objects, usually quasars, of about 295 radio sources, that are used to define the positions of closer objects because they are so vastly distant from us that they are virtually stationary from our perspective for an extremely long period of time. A sidereal calendar might have to select one of these objects as the reference point to track the length of the galactic year, by referencing the motion of the galactic center against that more distant reference point.

However, one good point about using the galactic center as the reference point for a sidereal calendar is that all the other visible stars that we group into constellations are also moving relative to the center, and, thus, the currently common constellations will "hold on to" most of the stars which we now assign to them..  Of course, some stars exhibit faster proper motion than others, and will "escape" from their traditional constellations sooner than others.  Alas, this is unavoidable, but will thankfully not happen to any visible degree for quite a while.

-Walter  Ziobro

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Karl Palmen <[hidden email]>
To: CALNDR-L <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wed, Apr 19, 2017 8:12 am
Subject: Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Dear Walter, Brij and Calendar People

 

I was thinking when would be an appropriate time to start a sidereal year and I thought that it could be one of the two times that the sun crosses the galactic equator, which runs along the centre of the milky way.

 

Wikipedia gives the galactic poles in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require them in ecliptic coordinates to calculate the two crossing points. Wikipedia does give the constellations of the galactic equator and so indicates that the two points are in the constellations of (Taurus or Gemini) and (Scorpius or Sagittarius).

 

Another possibility is to have the new sidereal year, when the sun is nearest to the galactic centre. Wikipedia gives the location of the galactic centre in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require ecliptic coordinates. The galactic centre is in the constellation of Sagittarius.

 

 

Karl

 

16(08(23

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 14 April 2017 18:30
To: CALNDR-[hidden email]
Subject: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

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Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Walter J Ziobro

Dear Karl

Would you or anyone else in the list know if the current value for the sidereal year is determined relative to the International Celestial Reference Frame?

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Thursday, April 20, 2017 Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Walter and Calendar People

 

WALTER SAID:

However, one point about the galactic center:  given that the sun is moving around the galactic center in an orbit the takes between 225 and 250 million years (which period is sometimes called a galactic year), the galactic center is slowing shifting against the background of more distant galaxies and objects from our perspective. 

 

KARL REPLIES:

This is one reason why I first considered first the points where the sun crosses the galactic equator, which Walter has not commented about. This is defined by the direction of the intersection line of the galactic and ecliptic planes. Another reason that the relevant points lie on the ecliptic, whereas the galactic centre and the radio sources mentioned will be off the ecliptic.

 

To be able to define a new year for any of the suggestions, we need the relevant points in ecliptic coordinates rather than equatorial coordinates.

 

Karl

 

16(08(24

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:CALNDR-L@...] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 20 April 2017 04:40
To: CALNDR-L@...
Subject: Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Dear Karl:

I have given some consideration to this matter as well.

The point which astronomers identify as the galactic center is called Sagittarius A.  It is actually very close to the currently defined boundary (in equatorial coordinates) of Scorpio and Sagittarius.  I think an ecliptic coordinate system can be made using Sagittarius A as ecliptic longitude Sagittarius 0.  This could then be used to redefine the zodiac.

I believe that dividing the ecliptic into twelve 30 degree arcs from Sagittarius A will cause most of the stars from each of the traditional zodiac constellations to fall within a common arc, and such longitudes could be the boundaries of the 12 zodiac constellations defined in ecliptic coordinates. These redefined ecliptic zodiac constellations could then be the basis of a new sidereal calendar, which could have 12 months named after the traditional zodiac constellations, each month of which would commence on or about the day when the sun crosses each of the 30 degree ecliptic points. 

A luni-solar sidereal calendar could be made as well, with an intercalary month added whenever two full moons occur while the moon is in the same ecliptic zodiac constellation.

However, one point about the galactic center:  given that the sun is moving around the galactic center in an orbit the takes between 225 and 250 million years (which period is sometimes called a galactic year), the galactic center is slowing shifting against the background of more distant galaxies and objects from our perspective. 

A true sidereal calendar might have to make reference to what is called by astronomers the International Celestial Reference Frame.   This is an agreed upon selection (by astronomers) of extremely distant objects, usually quasars, of about 295 radio sources, that are used to define the positions of closer objects because they are so vastly distant from us that they are virtually stationary from our perspective for an extremely long period of time. A sidereal calendar might have to select one of these objects as the reference point to track the length of the galactic year, by referencing the motion of the galactic center against that more distant reference point.

However, one good point about using the galactic center as the reference point for a sidereal calendar is that all the other visible stars that we group into constellations are also moving relative to the center, and, thus, the currently common constellations will "hold on to" most of the stars which we now assign to them..  Of course, some stars exhibit faster proper motion than others, and will "escape" from their traditional constellations sooner than others.  Alas, this is unavoidable, but will thankfully not happen to any visible degree for quite a while.

-Walter  Ziobro

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Karl Palmen <[hidden email]>
To: CALNDR-L <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wed, Apr 19, 2017 8:12 am
Subject: Re: Happy Sidereal New Year

Dear Walter, Brij and Calendar People

 

I was thinking when would be an appropriate time to start a sidereal year and I thought that it could be one of the two times that the sun crosses the galactic equator, which runs along the centre of the milky way.

 

Wikipedia gives the galactic poles in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require them in ecliptic coordinates to calculate the two crossing points. Wikipedia does give the constellations of the galactic equator and so indicates that the two points are in the constellations of (Taurus or Gemini) and (Scorpius or Sagittarius).

 

Another possibility is to have the new sidereal year, when the sun is nearest to the galactic centre. Wikipedia gives the location of the galactic centre in equatorial coordinates, but we’d require ecliptic coordinates. The galactic centre is in the constellation of Sagittarius.

 

 

Karl

 

16(08(23

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Walter J Ziobro
Sent: 14 April 2017 18:30
To: CALNDR-[hidden email]
Subject: Happy Sidereal New Year

 

Happy Sidereal New Year

April 14 is considered as the first day of Aires (sidereal) in many South and Southeastern Asian calendars

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail