Fwd: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

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Fwd: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Victor Engel
Dear Calendar People,

I did not know this.

Victor
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]


Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Michael Ossipoff


Victor--


Here's my comment on that subject:


I read that people never adjust to the annual change to daylight-saving time. Tired people who aren’t really awake. Car accidents. Occupational machine-accidents. So yes, the annual change has got to go. Leave it one way or the other, all year.

It’s said that starting the day before daylight, in the winter, is dangerous? Yeah? Then what about it being dark at or before 5 pm, when people of all ages are still out and going places? So, does avoidance of daylight-saving time really reduce the hours during which kids are out when it isn’t daylight?

Additionally, I suggest that being out in morning night is safer than being out in evening night, because, in the early morning, being hit by a car is the only danger, and that’s easily avoided. But, in evening night, that’s when attacks by other people are more likely.

So, from these considerations, I’d suggest that it’s safer to have year-round daylight-saving time. Or maybe just change the work & school hours (a feasible way to change our hours, when no annual changes are needed).

Additionally, aside from safety reasons, it seems to me that, just on general principle, if you’re going to be up &/or out, when it’s night, then morning night is better, because morning is about to arrive, and the day is about to start.

Better to have an early start than a late one.

So: I suggest all-year daylight-savin

On Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 3:58 PM, Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People,

I did not know this.

Victor
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]


Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*
Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Michael Ossipoff
I notice that part of my answer was left out. That's because it's a copy of my post the article's comments-forum.

But all that was left out was this:

So I suggest all-year daylight-savings-time, or a corresponding change in the designated clock-times for our work & school hours.

Michael Ossipoff

On Sat, Feb 4, 2017 at 12:16 PM, Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


Victor--


Here's my comment on that subject:


I read that people never adjust to the annual change to daylight-saving time. Tired people who aren’t really awake. Car accidents. Occupational machine-accidents. So yes, the annual change has got to go. Leave it one way or the other, all year.

It’s said that starting the day before daylight, in the winter, is dangerous? Yeah? Then what about it being dark at or before 5 pm, when people of all ages are still out and going places? So, does avoidance of daylight-saving time really reduce the hours during which kids are out when it isn’t daylight?

Additionally, I suggest that being out in morning night is safer than being out in evening night, because, in the early morning, being hit by a car is the only danger, and that’s easily avoided. But, in evening night, that’s when attacks by other people are more likely.

So, from these considerations, I’d suggest that it’s safer to have year-round daylight-saving time. Or maybe just change the work & school hours (a feasible way to change our hours, when no annual changes are needed).

Additionally, aside from safety reasons, it seems to me that, just on general principle, if you’re going to be up &/or out, when it’s night, then morning night is better, because morning is about to arrive, and the day is about to start.

Better to have an early start than a late one.

So: I suggest all-year daylight-savin

On Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 3:58 PM, Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People,

I did not know this.

Victor
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]


Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*
Learn More
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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Karl Palmen
In reply to this post by Victor Engel

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Amos Shapir-2
We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.


On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

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--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Victor Engel
What do you do near the poles?

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.


On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

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--
Amos Shapir
 

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Amos Shapir-2
Like any DST scheme, it's useless near the equator and poles; at least it has the advantage of covering areas where times of sunrise/sunset between summer and winter vary by up to two hours.

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 7:27 PM, Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
What do you do near the poles?

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.


On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 



--
Amos Shapir
 




--
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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Tom Peters-6
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir-2

The latest technology that does this more perfectly is about 25 centuries old and called a sun dial.

 

Verzonden vanaf mijn Windows 10-telefoon

 

Van: [hidden email]
Verzonden: woensdag 1 maart 2017 18:04
Aan: [hidden email]
Onderwerp: Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.

 

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

http://survey.newspapers.com/Default.aspx?open=WBXyotBRAH3uTOXE1uR5AQ%3d%3d&linkid=3

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

© 2017 Newspapers.com
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Your AccountHelpUnsubscribeView this email online

 




--

Amos Shapir

 

 

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Karl Palmen
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir-2

Dear Amos, Victor and Calendar People

 

Such a scheme would need to be tailored to latitude to keep 6am close to sunrise. This would give rise to sloping time zones away from the equinoxes with the greatest slope at the solstices.

 

Regions near the poles will sometimes have their nights shorter than sleeping time, when this happens, one can let dawn be earlier than 6am. Also in winter, one may want the very short day to occur around noon and so then dawn can be allowed to occur later than 6am.

 

I have mentioned Glorytime, which was proposed in a humorous British magazine called “Punch” in which a weekly change of the clocks by 15 minutes took place in spring and autumn for a fixed number of weeks. To be applied worldwide, the interval of 15 minutes would have different values for different latitudes and the fixed number of weeks may also depend on latitude.

 

One could have the clocks, each Sunday, adjusted a multiple of 5 minutes (or some other interval) to keep dawn of the following week as close to 6am as possible.  In regions near the poles, adjustment could be suspended, while either the day or night lasts less than say 8 hours.

 

A simpler idea may be to have single, double and possibly triple DST at dates dependent on latitude, possibly by means of my previous suggestion, with the 5-minute interval changed to an hour.

For England, one might have clocks go forward on the last Sundays of February, March & April and back on the last Sundays of August, September and October. Lower latitudes would require less extreme treatment. This would give rise to the sloping time zones I described.

 

If one defines a time zone as a region that observes the same time throughout the year, then such a time zone would have boundaries to the north and south as well as west and west. Actually this happens with some such time zones in present DST. For example, Paris time has a southern boundary in the Mediterranean sea and Sydney time has a northern boundary between New South Wales and Queensland.

 

Karl

 

16(07(05

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 01 March 2017 17:04
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.

 

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

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--

Amos Shapir

 

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Bill Spencer
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir-2

Since we got off calendars for a while talking about time zones … here’s some serious humor:  Randal Munroe’s comic XKCD addressed a world map based on where countries THINK they are judging from their time zone.

 

Now, we need to get him to draw a series of these maps based on shifts throughout the year, as each hemisphere goes on and off DST!  Though I think some automated help would be required to show this map based on sliding 6 am zones…

 

From: https://www.xkcd.com/1799/

 

Bill Spencer

 

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/bad_map_projection_time_zones_2x.png

 

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2017 5:29 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Amos, Victor and Calendar People

 

Such a scheme would need to be tailored to latitude to keep 6am close to sunrise. This would give rise to sloping time zones away from the equinoxes with the greatest slope at the solstices.

 

Regions near the poles will sometimes have their nights shorter than sleeping time, when this happens, one can let dawn be earlier than 6am. Also in winter, one may want the very short day to occur around noon and so then dawn can be allowed to occur later than 6am.

 

I have mentioned Glorytime, which was proposed in a humorous British magazine called “Punch” in which a weekly change of the clocks by 15 minutes took place in spring and autumn for a fixed number of weeks. To be applied worldwide, the interval of 15 minutes would have different values for different latitudes and the fixed number of weeks may also depend on latitude.

 

One could have the clocks, each Sunday, adjusted a multiple of 5 minutes (or some other interval) to keep dawn of the following week as close to 6am as possible.  In regions near the poles, adjustment could be suspended, while either the day or night lasts less than say 8 hours.

 

A simpler idea may be to have single, double and possibly triple DST at dates dependent on latitude, possibly by means of my previous suggestion, with the 5-minute interval changed to an hour.

For England, one might have clocks go forward on the last Sundays of February, March & April and back on the last Sundays of August, September and October. Lower latitudes would require less extreme treatment. This would give rise to the sloping time zones I described.

 

If one defines a time zone as a region that observes the same time throughout the year, then such a time zone would have boundaries to the north and south as well as west and west. Actually this happens with some such time zones in present DST. For example, Paris time has a southern boundary in the Mediterranean sea and Sydney time has a northern boundary between New South Wales and Queensland.

 

Karl

 

16(07(05

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 01 March 2017 17:04
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.

 

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

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--

Amos Shapir

 

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Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Victor Engel
Why does Russia get subdivided, apparently, into timezones but Canada and the US do not? I'd say the map needs some work.

Victor

On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 9:20 AM, Bill Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Since we got off calendars for a while talking about time zones … here’s some serious humor:  Randal Munroe’s comic XKCD addressed a world map based on where countries THINK they are judging from their time zone.

 

Now, we need to get him to draw a series of these maps based on shifts throughout the year, as each hemisphere goes on and off DST!  Though I think some automated help would be required to show this map based on sliding 6 am zones…

 

From: https://www.xkcd.com/1799/

 

Bill Spencer

 

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/bad_map_projection_time_zones_2x.png

 

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2017 5:29 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Amos, Victor and Calendar People

 

Such a scheme would need to be tailored to latitude to keep 6am close to sunrise. This would give rise to sloping time zones away from the equinoxes with the greatest slope at the solstices.

 

Regions near the poles will sometimes have their nights shorter than sleeping time, when this happens, one can let dawn be earlier than 6am. Also in winter, one may want the very short day to occur around noon and so then dawn can be allowed to occur later than 6am.

 

I have mentioned Glorytime, which was proposed in a humorous British magazine called “Punch” in which a weekly change of the clocks by 15 minutes took place in spring and autumn for a fixed number of weeks. To be applied worldwide, the interval of 15 minutes would have different values for different latitudes and the fixed number of weeks may also depend on latitude.

 

One could have the clocks, each Sunday, adjusted a multiple of 5 minutes (or some other interval) to keep dawn of the following week as close to 6am as possible.  In regions near the poles, adjustment could be suspended, while either the day or night lasts less than say 8 hours.

 

A simpler idea may be to have single, double and possibly triple DST at dates dependent on latitude, possibly by means of my previous suggestion, with the 5-minute interval changed to an hour.

For England, one might have clocks go forward on the last Sundays of February, March & April and back on the last Sundays of August, September and October. Lower latitudes would require less extreme treatment. This would give rise to the sloping time zones I described.

 

If one defines a time zone as a region that observes the same time throughout the year, then such a time zone would have boundaries to the north and south as well as west and west. Actually this happens with some such time zones in present DST. For example, Paris time has a southern boundary in the Mediterranean sea and Sydney time has a northern boundary between New South Wales and Queensland.

 

Karl

 

16(07(05

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 01 March 2017 17:04
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

We can do something similar to the "good old times" by using latest technology to devise a clock that will keep 6 am close to sunrise, by using a sliding DST scheme:  Start at standard time on spring equinox day, then increase the offset from UTC gradually following a sine curve until it reaches DST on summer solstice day; then do the reverse till autumn equinox day, and then continue doing the opposite during fall and winter months.

The sine curve may be approximated by the "1-2-3" rule: increase by 30 minutes in the 1st month following equinox (about 1 minute a day), then 20 minutes on the 2nd month and 10 minutes on the 3rd month.

If you really wish to push the geek envelope, timezone offset on months 2-3 can be approximated as (3600 - day^2/2) seconds.

 

On Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:03 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Victor, Michael and Calendar People

 

I think the need for daylight saving time arose, when we changed from the practice of dividing day into 12 hours and night into 12 hours, to having constant length hours. Before then, people would get up at around dawn, whether it was early or late. For them, dawn occurred the same time (6 am).  So then, there was no need to save daylight.

 

Karl

 

16(07(03

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 03 February 2017 20:59
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

I did not know this.

 

Victor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Newspapers.com <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 2:53 PM
Subject:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins
To: [hidden email]

Newspapers.com

 

Do you know why and when the contentious issue of Daylight Savings began?

War Time Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

"War Time" Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, "War Time"—a year-round daylight saving time—began in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

Save $10 on an Six Month Subscription Limited time.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest. …Continue reading

 

Upgrade your Newspapers.com Basic Subscription*

Learn More
*Included with your Ancestry All Access membership

 

 

 

Newspapers.com does not sell, rent or otherwise distribute the personal information you provide us to third party advertisers. Privacy Statement. To avoid this email being sent to your junk mail folder, please add this address ([hidden email]) to your safe senders list.

© 2017 Newspapers.com
P.O. Box 990 Orem, Utah 84058 USA

Your AccountHelpUnsubscribeView this email online

 




--

Amos Shapir

 


Reply | Threaded
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|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: 🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

Karl Palmen

Dear Victor and Calendar People

 

Russia gets divided, because up north because it has 2 hourly time zones.

 

I think the map squeezes each territory into it natural 15 degrees of hourly time zone.

 

However that does not explain the absence of a gap in Australia. Perhaps, the 9.5 hour time zone as treated as though it were 9 hours, else there’d be a gap between Western Australia and the rest of Australia.

 

Karl

 

16(07(19

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 16 March 2017 14:28
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re:
🕒 War Time" Daylight Saving Begins

 

Why does Russia get subdivided, apparently, into timezones but Canada and the US do not? I'd say the map needs some work.

 

Victor

 

On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 9:20 AM, Bill Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Since we got off calendars for a while talking about time zones … here’s some serious humor:  Randal Munroe’s comic XKCD addressed a world map based on where countries THINK they are judging from their time zone.

 

Now, we need to get him to draw a series of these maps based on shifts throughout the year, as each hemisphere goes on and off DST!  Though I think some automated help would be required to show this map based on sliding 6 am zones…

 

From: https://www.xkcd.com/1799/

 

Bill Spencer

 

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/bad_map_projection_time_zones_2x.png

 

 

 

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