Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage

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Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage

Sonny Pondrom
Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,

Take a look at the updated National Calendar  on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others. 

What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.

On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM, Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:


Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.



Sonny Pondrom
[hidden email]
314-445-8142
2014.II.10 (Fri)

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Re: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Sonny, sir:
>What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days >of the week.

My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my discussed proposal:
http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc 
on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of Gregorian calendar.
Regards,
Brij Bhushan Vij
(Father's Day) Sunday, 2014 June 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time
Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah -Rg Veda
The Astronomical Poem (revised number of days in any month)
"30 days has July,September,
April, June, November and December
all the rest have 31 except February which has 29
except on years divisible evenly by 4;
except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
as long as you remember that
"October (meaning 8) is the 10th month; and
December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30
Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep:30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30
(365th day of Year is World Day)
******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar*****
"Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti, purshaarth karne mein hai"
My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
Author had NO interaction with The World Calendar Association
except via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A
Possible World Calendar, since 1971.
HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR
"GAYATRI LOK"  Flat # 3013/3rd Floor
NH-58, Kankhal Bypass, Dev-Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408 (Uttrakhand - INDIA)

 

Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
To: [hidden email]

Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,

Take a look at the updated National Calendar  on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others. 

What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.

On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM, Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:


Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.



Sonny Pondrom
[hidden email]
314-445-8142
2014.II.10 (Fri)

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the Gregorian calendar problem

kaldarhan kambar
Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
This is unlikely to save the situation Mr. Brij Busan, I need a radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar

15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:

> Sonny, sir:
>>What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>
> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
> Regards,
> Brij Bhushan Vij
> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time
> Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda
> The Astronomical Poem (revised number of days in any month)
> "30 days has July,September,
> April, June, November and December
> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29
> except on years evenly divisible by 4;
> except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
> as long as you remember that
> "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the month; and
> December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30
> Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep 30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30
> (365th day of Year is World Day)
> ******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar*****
> "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti, purshaarth karne mein hai"
> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
> Author had NO interaction with The World Association Calendar
> except via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A
> Possible World Calendar, since 1971.
> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR
> "GAYATRI LOK" Flat # 3013/3rd Floor
> NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408 (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>
> ----------------------------------------
> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>
>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>
>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>
> Sonny Pondrom
> [hidden email]
> 314-445-8142
> 2014.II.10 (Fri)

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Re: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage

Sonny Pondrom
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Brij and Calendar People,
I think it would be nice to have the Leap Day in the middle of the leap years, but I don’t think it is worth swapping July 31 for a permanent Feb 29.  I say this because I don’t think a change of historical records is worth the yearly symmetry.   
 
On Jun 15, 2014, at 2:02 AM, Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:


My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my discussed proposal: 
http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc 
on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of Gregorian calendar.
Regards, 
Brij Bhushan Vij 

Sonny Pondrom
[hidden email]
314-445-8142
2014.II.10 (Fri)

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Choice & Cost-Effective RE: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Sonny, Cc sirs:
>.....I say this because I don’t think a change of historical records is worth the yearly symmetry.
History has changed in the past and so shall it change for a BETTER future! Is it only the 'historical records' (?) or there are other compelling reasons.
To me it is the cost of change and the cost of implementation that need be on 'higher priority'; like my Easiest, Surest and Cheapest transition proposal. Compare this with the ideals of the World calendar Organisation: http://www.brijvij.com/bb-cal-2013vstWCA.pdf
I am but a small man with hardly any 'political or financial background'; but my aims are clear and for the benefits of  All Men and All Nations. It is the choice and Ease, for which I plead United Nations to ponder over the "Question....Do we really wish to Reform the Gregorian calendar"?
I read a small book: Ideas that moved the Earth! This is one such attempt, sirs.
Regards,
Brij Bhushan Vij
Sunday, 2014 June 15H21:56(decimal)Mt Time
Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah -Rg Veda
The Astronomical Poem (revised number of days in any month)
"30 days has July,September,
April, June, November and December 
all the rest have 31 except February which has 29
except on years divisible evenly by 4;
except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
as long as you remember that
"October (meaning 8) is the 10th month; and
December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30
Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep:30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30
(365th day of Year is World Day)
******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar*****
"Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti, purshaarth karne mein hai"
My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
Author had NO interaction with The World Calendar Association
except via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A
Possible World Calendar, since 1971.
HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR
"GAYATRI LOK"  Flat # 3013/3rd Floor
NH-58, Kankhal Bypass, Dev-Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408 (Uttrakhand - INDIA)

 

Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2014 19:12:50 -0500
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
To: [hidden email]

Brij and Calendar People,
I think it would be nice to have the Leap Day in the middle of the leap years, but I don’t think it is worth swapping July 31 for a permanent Feb 29.  I say this because I don’t think a change of historical records is worth the yearly symmetry.   
 
On Jun 15, 2014, at 2:02 AM, Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:


My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my discussed proposal: 
http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc 
on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of Gregorian calendar.
Regards, 
Brij Bhushan Vij 

Sonny Pondrom
[hidden email]
314-445-8142
2014.II.10 (Fri)

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Re: the Gregorian calendar problem

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
In reply to this post by kaldarhan kambar
Dear Kaldarhan, Brij and Calendar People

This one day 'error' is different for the one day 'error' that Kaldarhan referred to earlier.
I refer to these 'errors' as differences, because the assertion that either difference is an error is dubious.

Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19

The two day difference of the 3712 summer Eurasian Calendar is caused by adding both the one day differences.
This may be the 2 day difference that Brij has mentioned as an error.

Karl

14(05(19


-----Original Message-----
From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 15 June 2014 17:40
To: [hidden email]
Subject: the Gregorian calendar problem

Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
This is unlikely to save the situation Mr. Brij Busan, I need a radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar

15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:

> Sonny, sir:
>>What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>
> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
> Regards,
> Brij Bhushan Vij
> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time Aa Nau
> Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda The Astronomical Poem (revised
> number of days in any month)
> "30 days has July,September,
> April, June, November and December
> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29 except on years
> evenly divisible by 4; except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 - as
> long as you remember that "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the
> month; and December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30 Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep 30;
> Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30 (365th day of Year is World Day) ******As per
> Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar***** "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti,
> purshaarth karne mein hai"
> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
> Author had NO interaction with The World Association Calendar except
> via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A Possible World
> Calendar, since 1971.
> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR "GAYATRI LOK" Flat #
> 3013/3rd Floor NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408
> (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>
> ----------------------------------------
> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>
>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>
>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>
> Sonny Pondrom
> [hidden email]
> 314-445-8142
> 2014.II.10 (Fri)

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Target Dates of Equinoxes and Solstices (was: the Gregorian calendar problem)

Christoph Päper-2
Karl Palmen <[hidden email]>:

> Supposed Target equinox: March 21

That’s always been a strange choice to me, although I don’t care that much about astronomic (or astrologic) alignment of the calendar.

A leap week calendar, though allowing greater jitter, could quickly fix this to the start or end of a month by leaving out the leap week once and possibly delay the start of its leap algorithm. A leap-day calendar could achieve the same, of course.

21 March is either -080 or -081 (in leap years) and can be any week date from W11-7 through W12-6.

In a 13-month calendar with 4 weeks per month, W12-7 or W13-1 would be nice.
In an equal-quarter calendar with
– … 13 weeks per quart (or season), W13-7 or W14-1 would be better.
– … 91 days per triad (or season), -091 or -092 would be preferable.
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Re: the Gregorian calendar problem

kaldarhan kambar
In reply to this post by Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
Dear Karl!
I made a mathematical theory "Antikythera Mechanism" and understand how it works. The ancient Greeks, the Romans used them, but no one knows how it was used. A lot of confusion. Nomads Scythians, Turks and Kazakhs use, and use exactly the calendar until today. This calendar is called "Togyz esabi". I compared your model card of heaven (http://www.astronet.ru/db/map/), all the same. Here based on the intersection of the moon and the Pleiades for each 27-28 days. Below is attached a mathematical theory. I think you will understand what is what.


16.06.2014, 19:02, "Karl Palmen" <[hidden email]>:

> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij and Calendar People
>
> This one day 'error' is different for the one day 'error' that Kaldarhan referred to earlier.
> I refer to these 'errors' as differences, because the assertion that difference is either an error is dubious.
>
> Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19
>
> The two day difference of the 3712 summer Eurasian Calendar is caused by adding both the one day differences.
> This may be the 2 day difference that Brij has mentioned as an error.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(19
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: 15 June 2014 17:40
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: the Gregorian calendar problem
>
> Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
> This is unlikely to save the situation, Mr. Brij Busan, I need a radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar
>
> 15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:
>> Sonny, sir:
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
>> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
>> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
>> Regards,
>> Brij Bhushan Vij
>> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time Aa Nau
>> Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda The Astronomical Poem (revised
>> number of days in any month)
>> "30 days has July,September,
>> April, June, November and December
>> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29 years except on
>> evenly divisible by 4; except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 - as
>> long as you remember that "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the
>> month; and December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
>> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
>> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30 Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep 30;
>> Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30 (365th day of Year is World Day) ******As per
>> Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar***** "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti,
>> purshaarth karne mein hai"
>> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
>> Author had NO interaction with The World Association except Calendar
>> via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A Possible World
>> Calendar, since 1971.
>> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
>> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR "GAYATRI LOK" Flat #
>> 3013/3rd Floor NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408
>> (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>>
>> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
>> From: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
>> To: [hidden email]
>>
>> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>>
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>>
>>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>> Sonny Pondrom
>> [hidden email]
>> 314-445-8142
>> 2014.II.10 (Fri)
>
> --
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.
--


The Antikythera Mechanism.docx (49K) Download Attachment
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Re: the Gregorian calendar problem

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
Dear Kaldarhan and Calendar People

The item that was attached below is NOT a mathematical theory.
It may be a result of a mathematical theory.
The underlying algorithm is not revealed.

However it does suggest that the "Antikythera Mechanism" may have been used with sidereal/tropical months of which there are one more per year than synodic months. I'm not an expert in the "Antikythera Mechanism" so cannot comment any further.

Karl

14(05(19

-----Original Message-----
From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 16 June 2014 14:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: the Gregorian calendar problem

Dear Karl!
I made a mathematical theory "Antikythera Mechanism" and understand how it works. The ancient Greeks, the Romans used them, but no one knows how it was used. A lot of confusion. Nomads Scythians, Turks and Kazakhs use, and use exactly the calendar until today. This calendar is called "Togyz esabi". I compared your model card of heaven (http://www.astronet.ru/db/map/), all the same. Here based on the intersection of the moon and the Pleiades for each 27-28 days. Below is attached a mathematical theory. I think you will understand what is what.


16.06.2014, 19:02, "Karl Palmen" <[hidden email]>:

> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij and Calendar People
>
> This one day 'error' is different for the one day 'error' that Kaldarhan referred to earlier.
> I refer to these 'errors' as differences, because the assertion that difference is either an error is dubious.
>
> Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19
>
> The two day difference of the 3712 summer Eurasian Calendar is caused by adding both the one day differences.
> This may be the 2 day difference that Brij has mentioned as an error.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(19
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: 15 June 2014 17:40
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: the Gregorian calendar problem
>
> Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
> This is unlikely to save the situation, Mr. Brij Busan, I need a
> radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of
> spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure
> of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has
> amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the
> forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar
>
> 15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:
>> Sonny, sir:
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
>> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
>> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
>> Regards,
>> Brij Bhushan Vij
>> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time Aa Nau
>> Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda The Astronomical Poem (revised
>> number of days in any month)
>> "30 days has July,September,
>> April, June, November and December
>> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29 years except on
>> evenly divisible by 4; except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
>> as long as you remember that "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the
>> month; and December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
>> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
>> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30 Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep
>> 30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30 (365th day of Year is World Day) ******As
>> per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar***** "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti,
>> purshaarth karne mein hai"
>> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
>> Author had NO interaction with The World Association except Calendar
>> via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A Possible World
>> Calendar, since 1971.
>> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
>> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR "GAYATRI LOK" Flat #
>> 3013/3rd Floor NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408
>> (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>>
>> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
>> From: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
>> To: [hidden email]
>>
>> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>>
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>>
>>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>> Sonny Pondrom
>> [hidden email]
>> 314-445-8142
>> 2014.II.10 (Fri)
>
> --
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.

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THE 19-YEAR LUNAR-SIDEREAL CALENDAR ["ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM"]

kaldarhan kambar
Dear Karl and Calendar People
This 19-year-old lunar-sidereal calendar still works, just that we (mankind) have forgotten how to use him. Pity that no one from the forum does not know about the "Antikythera mechanism"... by my calculations, it is possible to reanimate or to revive the ancient Greek, ancient Roman calendar, and a calendar of the Aztecs and Mayans. Most importantly, it was possible to clarify the modern history where a lot of confusion. Until now, the scientific world confuses 19-year Metonic and other 19 year cycles (Sumer, Babylon, Akkad, China and others) with the lunar-solar calendar, when it is the other part was closely connected with Lunar-sidereal calendar.


16.06.2014, 21:14, "Karl Palmen" <[hidden email]>:

> Dear Kaldarhan and Calendar People
>
> The item that was attached below is NOT a mathematical theory.
> It may be a result of a mathematical theory.
> The underlying algorithm is not revealed.
>
> However it does suggest that the "Antikythera Mechanism" may have been used with sidereal/tropical months of which there are one more per year than synodic months. I'm not an expert in the "Antikythera Mechanism" so cannot comment any further.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(19
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: 16 June 2014 14:43
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: the Gregorian calendar problem
>
> Dear Karl!
> I made a mathematical theory "Antikythera Mechanism" and understand how it works. The ancient Greeks, the Romans used them, but no one knows how it was used. A lot of confusion. Nomads Scythians, Turks and Kazakhs use, and use exactly the calendar until today. This calendar is called "Togyz esabi". I compared your model card of heaven (http://www.astronet.ru/db/map/), all the same. Here based on the intersection of the moon and the Pleiades for each 27-28 days. Below is attached a mathematical theory. I think you will understand what is what.
>
> 16.06.2014, 19:02, "Karl Palmen" <[hidden email]>:
>> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij and Calendar People
>>
>> This one day 'error' is different for the one day 'error' that Kaldarhan referred to earlier.
>> I refer to these 'errors' as differences, because the assertion that difference is either an error is dubious.
>>
>> Supposed Target equinox: March 21
>> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
>> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19
>>
>> The two day difference of the 3712 summer Eurasian Calendar is caused by adding both the one day differences.
>> This may be the 2 day difference that Brij has mentioned as an error.
>>
>> Karl
>>
>> 14(05(19
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
>> Sent: 15 June 2014 17:40
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: the Gregorian calendar problem
>>
>> Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
>> This is unlikely to save the situation, Mr. Brij Busan, I need a
>> radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of
>> spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure
>> of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has
>> amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the
>> forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar
>>
>> 15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:
>>> Sonny, sir:
>>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
>>> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
>>> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
>>> Regards,
>>> Brij Bhushan Vij
>>> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time Aa Nau
>>> Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda The Astronomical Poem (revised
>>> number of days in any month)
>>> "30 days has July,September,
>>> April, June, November and December
>>> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29 years except on
>>> evenly divisible by 4; except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
>>> as long as you remember that "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the
>>> month; and December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
>>> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
>>> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30 Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep
>>> 30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30 (365th day of Year is World Day) ******As
>>> per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar***** "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti,
>>> purshaarth karne mein hai"
>>> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
>>> Author had NO interaction with The World Association except Calendar
>>> via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A Possible World
>>> Calendar, since 1971.
>>> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
>>> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR "GAYATRI LOK" Flat #
>>> 3013/3rd Floor NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408
>>> (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>>>
>>> ----------------------------------------
>>> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
>>> From: [hidden email]
>>> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
>>> To: [hidden email]
>>>
>>> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>>>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>>>
>>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>>>
>>>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>>> Sonny Pondrom
>>> [hidden email]
>>> 314-445-8142
>>> 2014.II.10 (Fri)
>> --
>> --
>> Scanned by iCritical.
>
> --
>
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.

--
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COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

kaldarhan kambar
In reply to this post by Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
"Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.

16.06.2014, 19:02, "Karl Palmen" <[hidden email]>:

> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij and Calendar People
>
> This one day 'error' is different for the one day 'error' that Kaldarhan referred to earlier.
> I refer to these 'errors' as differences, because the assertion that difference is either an error is dubious.
>
> Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19
>
> The two day difference of the 3712 summer Eurasian Calendar is caused by adding both the one day differences.
> This may be the 2 day difference that Brij has mentioned as an error.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(19
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: 15 June 2014 17:40
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: the Gregorian calendar problem
>
> Hello to all the people who deals with the problem of the calendar!
> This is unlikely to save the situation, Mr. Brij Busan, I need a radical change. By my calculations, the last few years, the day of spring equinox without changing to fall on 21 March. But the structure of the Gregorian calendar it shows as of March 20. 1 day an error has amassed our old Gregorian calendar. All the details soon put it on the forum when you are ready project 3712 summer Eurasian calendar
>
> 15.06.2014, 13:02, "Brij Bhushan metric VIJ" <[hidden email]>:
>> Sonny, sir:
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>> My recommendation 'still' favor re-examination of my proposal discussed:
>> http://www.brijvij.com/bb_cal-res13.doc
>> on shifting the day of July 31 to 2nd month as February 29th (all years) and NOT CHANGE the current format of the Gregorian calendar.
>> Regards,
>> Brij Bhushan Vij
>> (Father's Day) Sunday, June 2014 15H12:03 (decimal) Mt Time Aa Nau
>> Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah-Rg Veda The Astronomical Poem (revised
>> number of days in any month)
>> "30 days has July,September,
>> April, June, November and December
>> all the rest have 31 except February which has 29 years except on
>> evenly divisible by 4; except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 - as
>> long as you remember that "October (meaning 8) is the 10th of the
>> month; and December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
>> OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
>> Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30 Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep 30;
>> Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30 (365th day of Year is World Day) ******As per
>> Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar***** "Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti,
>> purshaarth karne mein hai"
>> My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
>> Author had NO interaction with The World Association except Calendar
>> via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A Possible World
>> Calendar, since 1971.
>> HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
>> Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR "GAYATRI LOK" Flat #
>> 3013/3rd Floor NH-58, Kankhal Bypass Dev Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408
>> (Uttrakhand - INDIA)
>>
>> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:35:38 -0500
>> From: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Fwd: Saka Calendar and Hosi Webpage
>> To: [hidden email]
>>
>> Walter , Karl, Brij, Helios and other Calendar People,
>>> Take a look at the updated National Calendar on Facebook with the double holy day [or holiday] concept presented by many others.
>>>
>>> What do you think about not changing the Gregorian calendar, but making it perpetual with just changing the days of the week.
>>>
>>> On Jun 14, 2014, at 8:07 AM by Walter Ziobro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>> Overall, your webpage is quite impressive, but some of the links need to be edited.
>> Sonny Pondrom
>> [hidden email]
>> 314-445-8142
>> 2014.II.10 (Fri)
>
> --
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.
--

COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR.docx (168K) Download Attachment
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Re: THE 19-YEAR LUNAR-SIDEREAL CALENDAR ["ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM"]

michael.deckers
In reply to this post by kaldarhan kambar
   On 2014-06-17 04:11, kaldarhan kambar wrote
   about the calendar used on the Antikythera
   mechanism:

>  This 19-year lunar-sidereal calendar still works,
>  just that we (mankind) have forgotten how to use it.
 >  Pity that no one from the forum does not know about
 >  the "Antikythera mechanism"...

    The calendar is lunisolar (not lunar-sidereal),
    and its structure has only recently been deduced
    from the remains of the mechanism with advanced
    analytical methods. It is described in detail in
    the excellent paper
    [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v454/n7204/extref/nature07130-s1.pdf]

    The calendar has years of (354, 355, 384 or 383) d
    and average year length (365 + 5/19) d; each year
    has 12 or 13 months and (12 + 7/19) months on
    the average; each month has 30 tithis and
    (29 or 30) d, with average month length
    (6940 d)/235 = (63 + 1/11)/(64 + 1/11)·30 d.

    Its presence on an astronomical calculator
    suggests that it was used as an approximation
    for the diverse calendars used in ancient Greece.
    A similar calendar has been hypothesized by
    van der Waerden in 1960 based on hints by
    Geminus. So one cannot really say that mankind
    has forgotten how to use it.

    HTH

    Michael Deckers.
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Re: THE 19-YEAR LUNAR-SIDEREAL CALENDAR ["ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM"]

kaldarhan kambar
Dear Michael Deckers!

1 . You wrote:
"The calendar has years of (354, 355, 384 or 383) d, and average year length (365 + 5/19) d; each year has 12 or 13 months and (12 + 7/19) months on the average; each month has 30 tithis and (29 or 30) d, with average month length (6940 d)/235 = (63 + 1/11) / (64 + 1/11) • 30 d". Your link which you showed ([http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v454/n7204/extref/nature07130-s1.pdf]), shows absolutely another. Look...

2.  But, you are mistaken, Dear Michael Deckers!  "Antikythera mechanism" specified two types of a calendar.
1) Lunar сидерический calendar: 254th month × 27,321661 = 6939,7 ÷ 19 = 365,24747
2) Lunisolar calendar: 235th month × 29,53059 = 6939,69 ÷ 19 = 365,24677

Proof to it book Price [Price, Derek J. de Solla, "An Ancient Greek Computer". Scientific American, June 1959. p. 60-67]:

«ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM» SCHEME
Reconstruction of the Price, photo of 1980.
Price reconstruction
The price conducted x-ray research of the mechanism and constructed its scheme [1]. In 1959 it published the detailed description of the device [3] in the Scientific American magazine. The full scheme of the device was submitted only in 1971 and contained 32 gear wheels.
The dial on the forward party served for display of zodiac signs and days in a year. Two dials were behind adjusted on 2 cycles: the system of gear wheels with a transfer ratio 254:19 was used for modeling of movement of the Sun and the Moon of rather fixed stars. The ratio is chosen on the basis of Metonov of a cycle: 254 sideris of month (cycle time of the Moon of rather fixed stars) with a big accuracy 19 tropical years or 254-19=235 sinodic of month (the period of changes of phases of the Moon) make. The second cycle lasts 223 lunar (sinodic) of month, after its end the cycle of solar and lunar eclipses repeats. These repetitions allowed to calculate the provision of stars in the future – it was possible to set settings, rotating the handle. The provision of the Sun and the Moon was output to the dial from one of the mechanism parties.
At reconstruction of the Price there was a differential transfer which as earlier was considered, is invented not earlier than the XVI century.  With its help the difference of provisions of the Sun and the Moon which corresponds to Moon phases was calculated.  She was brought to other dial.  The British watchmaker John Gliv (John Gleave) constructed the working copy of the mechanism according to this scheme.
Wright's reconstruction
Michael Wright (Michael Wright), the specialist in mechanical devices from the London museum of science, undertook new research of the mechanism for what I used methods of a x-ray tomography. Radiographic two-dimensional cuts of the mechanism were constructed and studied. Preliminary results of research were presented in 1997. They showed that in reconstruction of the Price there are fundamental mistakes. In particular, it was convincingly shown that the assumption of existence of differential transfer in the mechanism isn't true [4]. In 2002 Wright offered the reconstruction [5][6]. He confirmed the general conclusion of the Price that the mechanism served for celestial motion modeling. According to Wright, the mechanism could model movement not only the Sun and the Moon, but also five planets known in the ancient time – Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn».

As correctness of the proof of Price, I send below the calculations, based on 19 summer lunar сидерический and a lunisolar cycle (19 × 4 = 76 years). If you don't understand that it for tables, then you not the professional. Would be better if I talked to Professor Mike Edmunds. This calculation on the basis of the detailed mathematical theory works. I can prove it anywhere and when necessary.

With deep respect of Kaldarkhan Aliseytuly Kambar for you


17.06.2014, 12:53, "michael.deckers" <[hidden email]>:

>    On 2014-06-17 04:11, kaldarhan kambar wrote
>    about the calendar used on the Antikythera
>    mechanism:
>>   This 19-year lunar-sidereal calendar still works,
>>   just that we (mankind) have forgotten how to use it.
>>   Pity that no one from the forum does not know about
>>   the "Antikythera mechanism"...
>
>     The calendar is lunisolar (not lunar-sidereal),
>     and its structure has only recently been deduced
>     from the remains of the mechanism with advanced
>     analytical methods. It is described in detail in
>     the excellent paper
>     [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v454/n7204/extref/nature07130-s1.pdf]
>
>     The calendar has years of (354, 355, 384 or 383) d
>     and average year length (365 + 5/19) d; each year
>     has 12 or 13 months and (12 + 7/19) months on
>     the average; each month has 30 tithis and
>     (29 or 30) d, with average month length
>     (6940 d)/235 = (63 + 1/11)/(64 + 1/11)·30 d.
>
>     Its presence on an astronomical calculator
>     suggests that it was used as an approximation
>     for the diverse calendars used in ancient Greece.
>     A similar calendar has been hypothesized by
>     van der Waerden in 1960 based on hints by
>     Geminus. So one cannot really say that mankind
>     has forgotten how to use it.
>
>     HTH
>
>     Michael Deckers.
-- 


KALDARHAN KAMBAR WROTE ABOUT THE CALENDAR USED ON THE ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM.docx (51K) Download Attachment
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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
In reply to this post by kaldarhan kambar
Dear Kaldarhan, Brij, Walter Calendar People

I said:
"Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"

I realise I did make a mistake with March 19 for the Eurasian Calendar.

What triggered the error is three possible numbers of days to schedule the Gregorian calendar earlier than the Julian calendar when it was started in 1582:

11 days: equinox normally March 21
10 days: actual Gregorian calendar
9 days: proleptic Gregorian calendar agrees with Julian in AD 325

The error I made is to wrongly associate the Eurasian Calendar with 9 days.


I now go straight to the topic of this note and give the opinion that Kaldarhan is waiting for.

Kaldarhan compares the Gregorian calendar with another calendar which also has 97 leap years in 400 years, but spread as smoothly as possible. I'll call such a calendar a smooth Gregorian calendar. There are numerous choices! Kaldarhan has chosen ONE smooth Gregorian calendar. He has said nothing about his choice other than mention Omar Khayyam. Walter Ziobro has suggested such a calendar.

The table is of little value because Kaldarhan has not explained his choice of smooth Gregorian calendar.

Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016.

Kaldarhan's lists the number of days elapsed in both the Gregorian calendar (column 5) and his smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9) since the start of the Gregorian calendar in October 1582. Kaldarhan has chosen to synchronise his smooth Gregorian calendar to the Gregorian at this start date. The Gregorian calendar has on average more elapsed days (column 5) than Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9). However this is of no significance, because one can choose the smooth Gregorian calendar to make this whatever one wants! In particular, if the smooth Gregorian calendar had 2016 as the only leap year 32 years after a leap year, the two calendars would on average have equal elapsed days (average of column 5 = average of column 9). I suggest Kaldarhan tries this, if he can.

Kaldarhan did mention Omar Khayyam and this suggests comparing his smooth Gregorian calendar to Solar Hijri Calendar.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Hijri_calendar 

The table shows leap years ending in 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2021, 2025, 2030, 2034, 2038 and so on every 33 years. Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar has its leap years around 1975 to 2040 almost always two years later than this, so are completely out of phase of this.


The results of an experiment have no value without details of how to do the experiment. This applies to computer modelling.


Karl

14(05(20


-----Original Message-----
From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 17 June 2014 05:12
To: [hidden email]
Subject: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
"Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.

 
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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
In reply to this post by kaldarhan kambar
Dear Kaldarhan, Walter and Calendar People

I said

"Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016"

Walter gave me a good description of his calendar in private and from this description it was obvious that this unique year is 2032 not 1995.

Karl

14(05(20 till noon

-----Original Message-----
From: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS)
Sent: 17 June 2014 14:01
To: 'East Carolina University Calendar discussion List'
Subject: RE: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Dear Kaldarhan, Brij, Walter Calendar People

I said:
"Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"

I realise I did make a mistake with March 19 for the Eurasian Calendar.

What triggered the error is three possible numbers of days to schedule the Gregorian calendar earlier than the Julian calendar when it was started in 1582:

11 days: equinox normally March 21
10 days: actual Gregorian calendar
9 days: proleptic Gregorian calendar agrees with Julian in AD 325

The error I made is to wrongly associate the Eurasian Calendar with 9 days.


I now go straight to the topic of this note and give the opinion that Kaldarhan is waiting for.

Kaldarhan compares the Gregorian calendar with another calendar which also has 97 leap years in 400 years, but spread as smoothly as possible. I'll call such a calendar a smooth Gregorian calendar. There are numerous choices! Kaldarhan has chosen ONE smooth Gregorian calendar. He has said nothing about his choice other than mention Omar Khayyam. Walter Ziobro has suggested such a calendar.

The table is of little value because Kaldarhan has not explained his choice of smooth Gregorian calendar.

Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016.

Kaldarhan's lists the number of days elapsed in both the Gregorian calendar (column 5) and his smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9) since the start of the Gregorian calendar in October 1582. Kaldarhan has chosen to synchronise his smooth Gregorian calendar to the Gregorian at this start date. The Gregorian calendar has on average more elapsed days (column 5) than Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9). However this is of no significance, because one can choose the smooth Gregorian calendar to make this whatever one wants! In particular, if the smooth Gregorian calendar had 2016 as the only leap year 32 years after a leap year, the two calendars would on average have equal elapsed days (average of column 5 = average of column 9). I suggest Kaldarhan tries this, if he can.

Kaldarhan did mention Omar Khayyam and this suggests comparing his smooth Gregorian calendar to Solar Hijri Calendar.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Hijri_calendar 

The table shows leap years ending in 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2021, 2025, 2030, 2034, 2038 and so on every 33 years. Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar has its leap years around 1975 to 2040 almost always two years later than this, so are completely out of phase of this.


The results of an experiment have no value without details of how to do the experiment. This applies to computer modelling.


Karl

14(05(20


-----Original Message-----
From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 17 June 2014 05:12
To: [hidden email]
Subject: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
"Supposed Target equinox: March 21
Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.

 
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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Ryan Provost-2
So, what unique year are you projecting? 2016? 2032? 1833? 1995? If 2016, then it's 2 years away. If 2016 is the unique year, then what unique time and date (in UTC) will it be?
-Ryan
Team Elite Leader
Team Elite Enterprises Productions

> Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 08:25:05 +0000

> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Walter and Calendar People
>
> I said
>
> "Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016"
>
> Walter gave me a good description of his calendar in private and from this description it was obvious that this unique year is 2032 not 1995.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20 till noon
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS)
> Sent: 17 June 2014 14:01
> To: 'East Carolina University Calendar discussion List'
> Subject: RE: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij, Walter Calendar People
>
> I said:
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
>
> I realise I did make a mistake with March 19 for the Eurasian Calendar.
>
> What triggered the error is three possible numbers of days to schedule the Gregorian calendar earlier than the Julian calendar when it was started in 1582:
>
> 11 days: equinox normally March 21
> 10 days: actual Gregorian calendar
> 9 days: proleptic Gregorian calendar agrees with Julian in AD 325
>
> The error I made is to wrongly associate the Eurasian Calendar with 9 days.
>
>
> I now go straight to the topic of this note and give the opinion that Kaldarhan is waiting for.
>
> Kaldarhan compares the Gregorian calendar with another calendar which also has 97 leap years in 400 years, but spread as smoothly as possible. I'll call such a calendar a smooth Gregorian calendar. There are numerous choices! Kaldarhan has chosen ONE smooth Gregorian calendar. He has said nothing about his choice other than mention Omar Khayyam. Walter Ziobro has suggested such a calendar.
>
> The table is of little value because Kaldarhan has not explained his choice of smooth Gregorian calendar.
>
> Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016.
>
> Kaldarhan's lists the number of days elapsed in both the Gregorian calendar (column 5) and his smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9) since the start of the Gregorian calendar in October 1582. Kaldarhan has chosen to synchronise his smooth Gregorian calendar to the Gregorian at this start date. The Gregorian calendar has on average more elapsed days (column 5) than Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9). However this is of no significance, because one can choose the smooth Gregorian calendar to make this whatever one wants! In particular, if the smooth Gregorian calendar had 2016 as the only leap year 32 years after a leap year, the two calendars would on average have equal elapsed days (average of column 5 = average of column 9). I suggest Kaldarhan tries this, if he can.
>
> Kaldarhan did mention Omar Khayyam and this suggests comparing his smooth Gregorian calendar to Solar Hijri Calendar.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Hijri_calendar
>
> The table shows leap years ending in 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2021, 2025, 2030, 2034, 2038 and so on every 33 years. Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar has its leap years around 1975 to 2040 almost always two years later than this, so are completely out of phase of this.
>
>
> The results of an experiment have no value without details of how to do the experiment. This applies to computer modelling.
>
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: 17 June 2014 05:12
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
> I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
> If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
> Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
> In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
> Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.
>
>
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.
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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC

Dear Ryan, Irv, Kaldarhan and Calendar People

 

I’ve worked out why Kaldarhan chose his smooth Gregorian calendar. But first I’ll address Ryan’s point.

 

The unique year belongs to a 400-year cycle of 97 leap years like the Gregorian 400-year cycle, except that the 97 leap years are spread to be spaced as smoothly as possible. This I referred to as a smooth Gregorian cycle.  It has twelve 33-year cycles, one of which is extended to 37 years.  Each of these 33-year or 37-year cycles has leap years 4 years apart within it. The unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year is the last leap year in the 37-year cycle.

 

The unique year effective specifies the phase of this cycle. My suggestion has leap years

 

1786 … 1814

1819 … 1847

1852 … 1880

1885 … 1913

1918 … 1946

1951 … 1979

1984 … 2016 (2016 32 years after 1984)

2021 … 2049

2054 … 2082

2087 … 2115

2120 … 2148

2153 … 2181

2186 … 2214

and so on every 400 years

where ‘…’ means every 4th year in between.

 

Walter’s suggestion has leap years 16 years later (unique 2032) and Kaldarhan’s has them 183 years earlier or 217 years later (unique 1833).

 

I next look at the quasi-symmetrical cycles of the type Irv favours.  The last year of such a cycle has the same leap status as the first year, the penultimate year has the same leap status as the second year, etc., except for the two middle years of which exactly one is a leap year. The quasi-symmetrical cycle with the first middle year as a leap year, has that year (1799) as the unique year and the cycle with the second middle year as a leap year, has the year 32 years later as the unique year (1832). I see this year is one year before the 1833 that Kaldarhan uses.

 

One property of a quasi-symmetrical cycle is that its first year starts as near to average as possible. Kaldarhan runs a quasi-symmetrical cycle one year late and so 1602 and 2002 have a near average start.  However for the equinox, it is the end of the year that matters, because the leap day position is before the equinox. So in Kaldarhan’s smooth Gregorian calendar, 1601 and 2001 have an average end. Consequently the mean equinoxes in this calendar are as for 1601 and 2001:

Tue, 20 Mar 1601 14:34:08 UTC

Tue, 20 Mar 2001 13:30:59 UTC

if the calendar were synchronised to Gregorian then.

 

Kaldarhan chose to synchronise his calendar on the start date of the Gregorian calendar rather than on these equinox dates. This caused the calendar to run a day earlier than Gregorian in 1601 and 2001, so causing these average equinoxes to occur on March 21 instead of March 20. The situation would have been different, if the Gregorian calendar started a year earlier in 1581 or later in 1584 or 1585. The start date of the Gregorian calendar is arbitrary and by choosing to synchronise his calendar then, Kaldarhan has placed undue significance on this date.

 

I got the equinox times from

http://stellafane.org/misc/equinox.html

 

Karl

 

14(05(21

 

From: Ryan Provost [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 18 June 2014 10:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

 

So, what unique year are you projecting? 2016? 2032? 1833? 1995? If 2016, then it's 2 years away. If 2016 is the unique year, then what unique time and date (in UTC) will it be?
-Ryan
Team Elite Leader
Team Elite Enterprises Productions

> Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 08:25:05 +0000
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Walter and Calendar People
>
> I said
>
> "Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016"
>
> Walter gave me a good description of his calendar in private and from this description it was obvious that this unique year is 2032 not 1995.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20 till noon
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS)
> Sent: 17 June 2014 14:01
> To: 'East Carolina University Calendar discussion List'
> Subject: RE: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij, Walter Calendar People
>
> I said:
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
>
> I realise I did make a mistake with March 19 for the Eurasian Calendar.
>
> What triggered the error is three possible numbers of days to schedule the Gregorian calendar earlier than the Julian calendar when it was started in 1582:
>
> 11 days: equinox normally March 21
> 10 days: actual Gregorian calendar
> 9 days: proleptic Gregorian calendar agrees with Julian in AD 325
>
> The error I made is to wrongly associate the Eurasian Calendar with 9 days.
>
>
> I now go straight to the topic of this note and give the opinion that Kaldarhan is waiting for.
>
> Kaldarhan compares the Gregorian calendar with another calendar which also has 97 leap years in 400 years, but spread as smoothly as possible. I'll call such a calendar a smooth Gregorian calendar. There are numerous choices! Kaldarhan has chosen ONE smooth Gregorian calendar. He has said nothing about his choice other than mention Omar Khayyam. Walter Ziobro has suggested such a calendar.
>
> The table is of little value because Kaldarhan has not explained his choice of smooth Gregorian calendar.
>
> Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016.
>
> Kaldarhan's lists the number of days elapsed in both the Gregorian calendar (column 5) and his smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9) since the start of the Gregorian calendar in October 1582. Kaldarhan has chosen to synchronise his smooth Gregorian calendar to the Gregorian at this start date. The Gregorian calendar has on average more elapsed days (column 5) than Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9). However this is of no significance, because one can choose the smooth Gregorian calendar to make this whatever one wants! In particular, if the smooth Gregorian calendar had 2016 as the only leap year 32 years after a leap year, the two calendars would on average have equal elapsed days (average of column 5 = average of column 9). I suggest Kaldarhan tries this, if he can.
>
> Kaldarhan did mention Omar Khayyam and this suggests comparing his smooth Gregorian calendar to Solar Hijri Calendar.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Hijri_calendar
>
> The table shows leap years ending in 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2021, 2025, 2030, 2034, 2038 and so on every 33 years. Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar has its leap years around 1975 to 2040 almost always two years later than this, so are completely out of phase of this.
>
>
> The results of an experiment have no value without details of how to do the experiment. This applies to computer modelling.
>
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [[hidden email]]
> Sent: 17 June 2014 05:12
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
> I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
> If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
> Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
> In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
> Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.
>
>
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.


--
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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Walter Ziobro
In reply to this post by kaldarhan kambar
Recenly, Karl posted:

>Date:    Wed, 18 Jun 2014 08:25:05 +0000
>From:    Karl Palmen <[hidden email]>
>Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

>Dear Kaldarhan, Walter and Calendar People

>I said

>"Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year =
>that is 32 years after another leap year.=20
>In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walt=
>er's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have s=
>uggested 2016"

>Walter gave me a good description of his calendar in private and from this =
>description it was obvious that this unique year is 2032 not 1995.

To which I respond:

You can be forgiven for being confused about that.  The truth is, that when I originally posted my ideas about the 400 year calendar, it was still a work in process, and I wasn't precise about the description.  I was  even confused myself about whether the 32nd or 33rd year of the 33 year period should be a leap year.  When someone reminded me that it was the 32nd year in the Dee and Dee-Cecil Calendars, I decided the follow those patterns.  That may be why you thought that the 395th year was the unique year.

-Walter Ziobro

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Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

Karl Palmen - UKRI STFC
In reply to this post by Ryan Provost-2

Dear Kaldarhan, Irv and Calendar People

 

I realise that I made an error. I thought that the middle two years of the 400-year cycle were the 199th and 200th years, but they are the 200th and 201st years. Hence the unique year in a quasi-symmetrical cycle is the 200th or 233rd year. I now see the Kaldarhan’s smooth Gregorian calendar is a quasi-symmetrical cycle (beginning AD 1). This makes the equinox of 1600 average (rather than 1601 as previously shown).

Mon, 20 Mar 1600 08:42:22 UTC

Mon, 20 Mar 2000 07:35:24 UTC

Kaldarhan synchronised at 1582 rather than 1600 and it is this that made his equinoxes a day later (March 21). The choice of date to synchronise is critical.

 

I note Kaldarhan’s calendar is synchronised to Gregorian in 1925 (can be seen in his attached table) and so it would be synchronised to the proleptic Gregorian calendar in AD 325.

 

Karl

 

14(02(22

 

From: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS)
Sent: 18 June 2014 13:06
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

 

Dear Ryan, Irv, Kaldarhan and Calendar People

 

I’ve worked out why Kaldarhan chose his smooth Gregorian calendar. But first I’ll address Ryan’s point.

 

The unique year belongs to a 400-year cycle of 97 leap years like the Gregorian 400-year cycle, except that the 97 leap years are spread to be spaced as smoothly as possible. This I referred to as a smooth Gregorian cycle.  It has twelve 33-year cycles, one of which is extended to 37 years.  Each of these 33-year or 37-year cycles has leap years 4 years apart within it. The unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year is the last leap year in the 37-year cycle.

 

The unique year effective specifies the phase of this cycle. My suggestion has leap years

 

1786 … 1814

1819 … 1847

1852 … 1880

1885 … 1913

1918 … 1946

1951 … 1979

1984 … 2016 (2016 32 years after 1984)

2021 … 2049

2054 … 2082

2087 … 2115

2120 … 2148

2153 … 2181

2186 … 2214

and so on every 400 years

where ‘…’ means every 4th year in between.

 

Walter’s suggestion has leap years 16 years later (unique 2032) and Kaldarhan’s has them 183 years earlier or 217 years later (unique 1833).

 

I next look at the quasi-symmetrical cycles of the type Irv favours.  The last year of such a cycle has the same leap status as the first year, the penultimate year has the same leap status as the second year, etc., except for the two middle years of which exactly one is a leap year. The quasi-symmetrical cycle with the first middle year as a leap year, has that year (1799) as the unique year and the cycle with the second middle year as a leap year, has the year 32 years later as the unique year (1832). I see this year is one year before the 1833 that Kaldarhan uses.

 

One property of a quasi-symmetrical cycle is that its first year starts as near to average as possible. Kaldarhan runs a quasi-symmetrical cycle one year late and so 1602 and 2002 have a near average start.  However for the equinox, it is the end of the year that matters, because the leap day position is before the equinox. So in Kaldarhan’s smooth Gregorian calendar, 1601 and 2001 have an average end. Consequently the mean equinoxes in this calendar are as for 1601 and 2001:

Tue, 20 Mar 1601 14:34:08 UTC

Tue, 20 Mar 2001 13:30:59 UTC

if the calendar were synchronised to Gregorian then.

 

Kaldarhan chose to synchronise his calendar on the start date of the Gregorian calendar rather than on these equinox dates. This caused the calendar to run a day earlier than Gregorian in 1601 and 2001, so causing these average equinoxes to occur on March 21 instead of March 20. The situation would have been different, if the Gregorian calendar started a year earlier in 1581 or later in 1584 or 1585. The start date of the Gregorian calendar is arbitrary and by choosing to synchronise his calendar then, Kaldarhan has placed undue significance on this date.

 

I got the equinox times from

http://stellafane.org/misc/equinox.html

 

Karl

 

14(05(21

 

From: Ryan Provost [[hidden email]]
Sent: 18 June 2014 10:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR

 

So, what unique year are you projecting? 2016? 2032? 1833? 1995? If 2016, then it's 2 years away. If 2016 is the unique year, then what unique time and date (in UTC) will it be?
-Ryan
Team Elite Leader
Team Elite Enterprises Productions

> Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 08:25:05 +0000
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
> To: [hidden email]
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Walter and Calendar People
>
> I said
>
> "Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016"
>
> Walter gave me a good description of his calendar in private and from this description it was obvious that this unique year is 2032 not 1995.
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20 till noon
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Palmen, Karl (STFC,RAL,ISIS)
> Sent: 17 June 2014 14:01
> To: 'East Carolina University Calendar discussion List'
> Subject: RE: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Kaldarhan, Brij, Walter Calendar People
>
> I said:
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
>
> I realise I did make a mistake with March 19 for the Eurasian Calendar.
>
> What triggered the error is three possible numbers of days to schedule the Gregorian calendar earlier than the Julian calendar when it was started in 1582:
>
> 11 days: equinox normally March 21
> 10 days: actual Gregorian calendar
> 9 days: proleptic Gregorian calendar agrees with Julian in AD 325
>
> The error I made is to wrongly associate the Eurasian Calendar with 9 days.
>
>
> I now go straight to the topic of this note and give the opinion that Kaldarhan is waiting for.
>
> Kaldarhan compares the Gregorian calendar with another calendar which also has 97 leap years in 400 years, but spread as smoothly as possible. I'll call such a calendar a smooth Gregorian calendar. There are numerous choices! Kaldarhan has chosen ONE smooth Gregorian calendar. He has said nothing about his choice other than mention Omar Khayyam. Walter Ziobro has suggested such a calendar.
>
> The table is of little value because Kaldarhan has not explained his choice of smooth Gregorian calendar.
>
> Each 400-year cycle of a smooth Gregorian calendar has a unique leap year that is 32 years after another leap year.
> In Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar, this unique year is 1833. In Walter's suggestion it is 1995 (if I recall his suggestion correctly). I have suggested 2016.
>
> Kaldarhan's lists the number of days elapsed in both the Gregorian calendar (column 5) and his smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9) since the start of the Gregorian calendar in October 1582. Kaldarhan has chosen to synchronise his smooth Gregorian calendar to the Gregorian at this start date. The Gregorian calendar has on average more elapsed days (column 5) than Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar (column 9). However this is of no significance, because one can choose the smooth Gregorian calendar to make this whatever one wants! In particular, if the smooth Gregorian calendar had 2016 as the only leap year 32 years after a leap year, the two calendars would on average have equal elapsed days (average of column 5 = average of column 9). I suggest Kaldarhan tries this, if he can.
>
> Kaldarhan did mention Omar Khayyam and this suggests comparing his smooth Gregorian calendar to Solar Hijri Calendar.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Hijri_calendar
>
> The table shows leap years ending in 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2021, 2025, 2030, 2034, 2038 and so on every 33 years. Kaldarhan's smooth Gregorian calendar has its leap years around 1975 to 2040 almost always two years later than this, so are completely out of phase of this.
>
>
> The results of an experiment have no value without details of how to do the experiment. This applies to computer modelling.
>
>
> Karl
>
> 14(05(20
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kaldarhan kambar [[hidden email]]
> Sent: 17 June 2014 05:12
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: COMPUTER CALCULATION MODELING OF THE GREGORIAN CALENDAR
>
> Dear Karl, Brij and Calendar People
> "Supposed Target equinox: March 21
> Gregorian equinox normally: March 20
> 3712 Summer Eurasian equinox normally: March 19"
> I nearly 10 times checked the calculations 3712 summer Eurasian calendar, the day of spring equinox always meet on March 21, where did on March 19, who wrote Karl, I don't know.
> If one follows simple mathematical rules, then it is clear irregularity structure of the Gregorian calendar.
> Not to be unfounded, I have made 6 table.
> In these tables compared the modern 400-year-old Gregorian calendar (365,2425 days), and near 400 year cycle for computer calculation modeling (365,2425 days).
> Here you can see in the modern Gregorian calendar, the simple century years from the 7th to the 8th year be leap years. This is not correct. 6 tables in the Appendix, approximately every 33 years, from 4-th to 5-th year is to be leap years as the calendar of Omar Khayyam. It would be very correct than the modern Gregorian calendar. Waiting for your opinion.
>
>
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.


--
Scanned by iCritical.