Final-List-Quit Topic-Summary and Comments

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Final-List-Quit Topic-Summary and Comments

Michael Ossipoff

Final-List-Quit Topic-Summary and Comments

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First, let me assure you that this will by the last e-mail with which I “ruin this list”  :D

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I’ll just summarize, without details, what my purposes and participation here have been, with a few additional comments.

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General Class of Nearest Monday Year-Start Rules:

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I intended to, and did, mention to the roughly 200 list-members here a new, and much briefer, year-start-rule wording.

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The general Nearest-Monday class of year-start rules is a new year-start wording that is incomparably briefer and more transparently, obviously and naturally motivated and justified than any other comparably seasonally-accurate year-start rule.  (…including any leapyear-rule.)

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When I’ve described it to non-calendarists with no familiarity with alternative calendars, even the arithmetical Nearest-Monday rule was understood (the rule and its motivation and justification) completely and immediately.

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I emphasize that that can’t be said for any previously proposed arithmetical year-start rule or leapyear rule with comparable accuracy.

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Here’s how I introduce arithmetical Nearest-Monday:

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Because roughly every 365.2422 mean solar days the Sun returns to the same ecliptic-longitude, and the seasonal-year returns to the same seasonal time-of-year…

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…so, every 365.2422 days, a new calendar-year starts with the Monday whose starting-midnight is closest to the end of that 365.2422 day period.

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…where the first 365.2422 day period in that sequence of end-to-end 365.2422 day periods, started at the South-Solstice of Gregorian 2017.

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As I said, that year-start-rule specification (the rule, its motivation and justification) was immediately understood by every non-calendarist (with no familiarity with alternative calendar proposals)  to whom I stated it.

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As I said, I emphasize that that can’t be said for any previously-proposed arithmetical year-start rule or leapyear-rule of comparable accuracy.

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That’s the year-start rule for my 3 seasonal calendar proposals:

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South-Solstice WeekDate

6-Seasons  -3 wk Offset

6-Seasons  0  Offset

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Seasonal Calendar Proposals:

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I’ll comment about them without re-stating their definitions here.  …except to clarify that I’ve recently modified 6-Season  -3 wk Offset so as to not have months, and to number the weeks consecutively in each season.

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..except that the South season is divided into Early-South (the 3 weeks before the new year-start) and Late-South (the 2 weeks after the new year-start), where in each of those two divisions of that divided South season, weeks are consecutively numbered from 1.

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Likewise, as now modified, in 6-Season  0 Offset, there are no months.  Weeks are consecutively numbered in each season.

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What I intended, and why I proposed 3 seasonal calendars:

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I wanted seasonal calendars.  Of course I don’t take credit for first proposing seasonal calendars. The French-Republican Calendar of 1792 is a seasonal-calendar, and so is Asimov’s World-Seasonal Calendar.

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First, as for whether seasonal-calendars are justified, I’ve addressed that matter in previous posts, and so I won’t repeat about that here.   But I’ll just point out again that I didn’t originate the claim that seasonal calendars can have relevance—There were at least the two previous seasonal calendars that I mentioned in the previous paragraph. One of them was adopted by a country.

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But there are things about those two previous seasonal-calendars that I wanted to improve:

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1. They both try to shoe-horn the seasonal-year into 4 seasons.

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2. They both start their nominal South season near the South-Solstice.

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So…do you think Peter can forgive me for “ruining this list” by suggesting other possibilities for seasonal calendars that don’t do those things?   :D

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South-Solstice WeekDate doesn’t do either of those things, because it doesn’t have any year-divisions other than the week and the day.

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6-Seasons  -3 wk Offset doesn’t do either of the 2 things that I objected to above.

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6-Seasons 0 Offset does only one of the 2 things that I objected to above.  (…making it a compromise for simplicity, or a concession to people who want to reserve the word “Winter”, for the very coldest part that occurs after the Winter-Solstice.)

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Of those latter two proposals of mine, I prefer 6-Seasons  -3 wk Offset. 

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It’s my favorite alternative calendar.

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Because there evidently has been some misunderstanding about this, after I’d already clarified about it:

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I said that I like my 3 seasonal calendar proposals. At no time have I said that anyone else would or should like them.

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I said that they’re intended as proposals for some hypothetical (surely fictitious) time when people demand a complete departure from how things were done in the past.  At no time did I say that someday people will come around to preferring what I prefer.  

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…I said only that those would be my proposals for such a hypothetical time.

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South-Solstice WeekDate is the minimal seasonal calendar.

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(The only one that could be called more minimal would be a numbering of the year’s days, without any other numbered year-division, or any other un-repeated named year-division. But for it to have convenience anything like current proposals, it would need a 10-day week. My 3 proposals only use the 7-day week.)

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South-Solstice WeekDate is a seasonal calendar by virtue of starting its calendar year near the South-Solstice.  

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Starting the calendar-year at an ecliptic cardinal-point (solstice or equinox) is what makes Asimov’s World-Seasonal a seasonal calendar, and is part of what makes French-Republican a seasonal calendar.

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6-Seasons  -3 wk Offset is the opposite of South-Solstice WeekDate, in the sense that it makes more specifications, and more changes from already-existing proposals.

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A few brief comments about calendar-reform:

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This notion that Roman-Gregorian is inconvenient, or isn’t convenient enough, is a perception of calendarists and calendar-reform-advocates only.

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In general, practically no one considers Roman-Gregorian to be inconvenient or in need of change or replacement.

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To nearly everyone, a new calendar or a change in the calendar is regarded as much more, incomparably more, inconvenient than anything about Roman-Gregorian.

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In fact, to nearly everyone, Roman-Gregorian isn’t inconvenient at all. 

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People are used to Roman-Gregorian and everything about it.  No one needs or wants a different calendar, and there isn’t going to be one.

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That’s fine, because, as I’ve been mentioning, and as others here have said too, there’s nothing wrong with Roman-Gregorian.  In previous posts I’ve told why that is.

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That concludes this summary and comments.

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…and concludes the things that I’ve intended to say at this list. This is my concluding post here.

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I emphasize that what I’ve said here is to the roughly 200 list-members, not to the two or three self-appointed post-evaluators.

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2019 Late-South  Week 1  Wednesday  (6-Seasons  -3 wk Offset)

2019 South  Week 1  Wednesday (6-Seasons 0 Offset)

2019-W01-3  (South-Solstice WeekDate)

2018-W52-3  (ISO WeekDate)

2018 December 26th  (Roman-Gregorian)

2018 December 27th (Hanke-Henry)

5 Nivose, Dog CCXXVII (French Republican Calendar of 1792)

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Michael Ossipoff

 

 

 

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