Epoch of the Jewish calendar

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Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Aristeo Fernando-3
Dear Calendar People,

When did the Jews start to use the epoch of anno mundi (AM)?
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."
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Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Amos Shapir-2
Hi Aristeo and calendar people,

The current count of the Jewish year, which is supposed to count years since the creation of the world, had become prevalent during medieval times, mostly in Europe, though its sources are much older.  The exact calculation upon which it is based, by clues in the early books of the Bible, is attributed to Rabbi Eliezer son of Horkanos, who had lived during the 1st century AD.

Amos.

On Sun, Oct 16, 2016 at 6:17 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People,

When did the Jews start to use the epoch of anno mundi (AM)?
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."



--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Karl Palmen

Dear Amos and Calendar People

 

This would explain its absence from the Bible and why there was no statement like Jesus was born in AM 3757 (or by Aristeo’s reckoning AM 3728).

 

I get the impression that in those days the calendar was used to schedule fasts and feasts and not to record the time of events. Therefore a year numbering system was not important, but would later become useful for implementing the rules passed on in AD 538.

 

Karl

 

16(01(16

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 17 October 2016 08:52
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

 

Hi Aristeo and calendar people,

The current count of the Jewish year, which is supposed to count years since the creation of the world, had become prevalent during medieval times, mostly in Europe, though its sources are much older.  The exact calculation upon which it is based, by clues in the early books of the Bible, is attributed to Rabbi Eliezer son of Horkanos, who had lived during the 1st century AD.

Amos.

 

On Sun, Oct 16, 2016 at 6:17 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People,

When did the Jews start to use the epoch of anno mundi (AM)?

Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."




--

Amos Shapir

 

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Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Amos Shapir-2
Hi Karl and calendar people,

Actually, the Bible is full of recorded times of events; but their year number is almost always stated as "in the year N of the reign of king K".  Only exceptionally important events are dated by historical reference, such as the building of the Temple by king Solomon, dated from the Exodus (1Kings 6:1).

Amos

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 3:11 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Amos and Calendar People

 

This would explain its absence from the Bible and why there was no statement like Jesus was born in AM 3757 (or by Aristeo’s reckoning AM 3728).

 

I get the impression that in those days the calendar was used to schedule fasts and feasts and not to record the time of events. Therefore a year numbering system was not important, but would later become useful for implementing the rules passed on in AD 538.

 

Karl

 

16(01(16

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 17 October 2016 08:52
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

 

Hi Aristeo and calendar people,

The current count of the Jewish year, which is supposed to count years since the creation of the world, had become prevalent during medieval times, mostly in Europe, though its sources are much older.  The exact calculation upon which it is based, by clues in the early books of the Bible, is attributed to Rabbi Eliezer son of Horkanos, who had lived during the 1st century AD.

Amos.

 

On Sun, Oct 16, 2016 at 6:17 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Calendar People,

When did the Jews start to use the epoch of anno mundi (AM)?

Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."




--

Amos Shapir

 




--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Aristeo Fernando-3
Dear Amos and Karl and Calendar People,
.
I agree with Amos that the Holy Bible records events except 1 Kings 6:1 where it states: "And it came to pass in the four hundred and eightieth year after the children of Israel were come out of the land of Egypt, in the fourth year of Solomon's reign over Israel, in the month Zif, which is the second month, that he began to build the house of the LORD."
.
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader.wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."



From: Amos Shapir <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 1:12 AM
Subject: Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar

Hi Karl and calendar people,

Actually, the Bible is full of recorded times of events; but their year number is almost always stated as "in the year N of the reign of king K".  Only exceptionally important events are dated by historical reference, such as the building of the Temple by king Solomon, dated from the Exodus (1Kings 6:1).

Amos

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 3:11 PM, Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Amos and Calendar People
 
This would explain its absence from the Bible and why there was no statement like Jesus was born in AM 3757 (or by Aristeo’s reckoning AM 3728).
 
I get the impression that in those days the calendar was used to schedule fasts and feasts and not to record the time of events. Therefore a year numbering system was not important, but would later become useful for implementing the rules passed on in AD 538.
 
Karl
 
16(01(16
 
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Amos Shapir
Sent: 17 October 2016 08:52
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Epoch of the Jewish calendar
 
Hi Aristeo and calendar people,
The current count of the Jewish year, which is supposed to count years since the creation of the world, had become prevalent during medieval times, mostly in Europe, though its sources are much older.  The exact calculation upon which it is based, by clues in the early books of the Bible, is attributed to Rabbi Eliezer son of Horkanos, who had lived during the 1st century AD.
Amos.
 
On Sun, Oct 16, 2016 at 6:17 AM, Aristeo Fernando <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Calendar People,
When did the Jews start to use the epoch of anno mundi (AM)?
Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit
Motto: pro aris et focis (for the sake of, or defense of, religion and home)
http://aristean.org/ and http://peacecrusader. wordpress.com/
"The Internet is mightier than the sword."



--
Amos Shapir
 



--
Amos Shapir