Designing a calendar

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Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

sparkielee
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
27 Aries♈13520 UCC

I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:

> PAULA:
>
> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>
> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>
> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>
> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>
> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>
> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>
> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>
> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>
> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>
> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>
> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>
> Regards,
> Jamison
>
> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Litmus UCC
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:

>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

sparkielee
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
Paula, Jamison Cc sirs:
Is the reason for rejection of Gregorian Format of calendar ‘has been the issue’; I 
>That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.
have offered the solution - in HONOURING Pope Gregory XIII and his *asymmetrical format, converting it into SYMMETRICAL; moreso to the advantage of ‘humans born on February 29th (Every Year) to enjoy their 
image1.jpeg
birth date, on shifting July 31* making the month of July to have 30 days (I place the Format again) to enlighten those experts who have as yet ignored to see its advantages?
This can comfortably be used for any options of 364-day years. December 31 & Leap Day are placed OUTSIDE of calendar format to be used as placing LD between June 30 and July 01; as also can be used as Leap Week calendar on *DIVIDE SIX(6) Plsn* also enhancing the Mean Year Value in my 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) capable to be aligned with CURENT duration of ‘dark moon to dark moon’. 
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 17:35, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Litmus UCC
The sixth day is Revolution. That Festival only occurs during Leap Years, and celebrates the French Revolution. Outside of France, it could celebrate the end of a different country's revolution, or the end of a civil war, or any other major date in that country's history.

Jamison

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

It is true that a year of 364 days, plus one day, plus another during Leap Year, is symmetrical. Perhaps you can explain your calendar further?

Jamison

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula, Jamison Cc sirs:
Is the reason for rejection of Gregorian Format of calendar ‘has been the issue’; I 
>That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.
have offered the solution - in HONOURING Pope Gregory XIII and his *asymmetrical format, converting it into SYMMETRICAL; moreso to the advantage of ‘humans born on February 29th (Every Year) to enjoy their 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1099/RAW"" alt="image1.jpeg" id="B58496C7-755F-48CB-B245-F7B14F124579">
birth date, on shifting July 31* making the month of July to have 30 days (I place the Format again) to enlighten those experts who have as yet ignored to see its advantages?
This can comfortably be used for any options of 364-day years. December 31 & Leap Day are placed OUTSIDE of calendar format to be used as placing LD between June 30 and July 01; as also can be used as Leap Week calendar on *DIVIDE SIX(6) Plsn* also enhancing the Mean Year Value in my 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) capable to be aligned with CURENT duration of ‘dark moon to dark moon’. 
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 17:35, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

sparkielee
In reply to this post by Litmus UCC
Litmus,

I do see the similarity between the UCC and the FRC. However, I see symbols instead of the names of the days of the week. I recognize the one for male and the one for female, but I don't know what they or the others are called.

I see that you have the 10 day "weeks" like the FRC. And the months have the names of the zodiac signs too. If your birthday's under a certain sign, you were most likely born in the month named after that sign. For example, my birthday on the Gregorian calendar is December 8. A lot of people if they bring up the subject of "astrology" or "what's your sign?
They would either ask me when my birthday is and tell me I'm a "Sagittarius" or ask me what my sign is. If they ask me that, of course they want to hear whatever zodiac sign my birthday "falls under." I did notice that most "birthdays" in your month of Sagittarius are under that sign-even though I see a few Scorpio "birthdays" there too. I can understand it needs to be that way to form the perfect 10 day week and 3 week month-not to mention the symmetry.

I'm not going to lose any sleep over who's a Scorpio whose birthday's in the month of Sagittarius. I don't believe in astrology myself even though a lot of people like to talk about it and read their horoscopes.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 7:41 PM Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
27 Aries♈13520 UCC

I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
> PAULA:
>
> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>
> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>
> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>
> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>
> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>
> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>
> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>
> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>
> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>
> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>
> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>
> Regards,
> Jamison
>
> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

sparkielee
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
Maybe it can be a winter break or part of one for people in the United States, an extended "New Year's Eve" (don't drink and drive) or an invitation to come out of your warm homes and socialize.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 9:14 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The sixth day is Revolution. That Festival only occurs during Leap Years, and celebrates the French Revolution. Outside of France, it could celebrate the end of a different country's revolution, or the end of a civil war, or any other major date in that country's history.

Jamison

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: 13520.01.27 - Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
I am thinking we could celebrate the end of the American Civil War.

Jamison


On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Maybe it can be a winter break or part of one for people in the United States, an extended "New Year's Eve" (don't drink and drive) or an invitation to come out of your warm homes and socialize.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 9:14 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The sixth day is Revolution. That Festival only occurs during Leap Years, and celebrates the French Revolution. Outside of France, it could celebrate the end of a different country's revolution, or the end of a civil war, or any other major date in that country's history.

Jamison

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy


--
"You must be the change you want to see in the world."

Mahatma Gandhi

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Re: Designing a calendar

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
Jamison, Cakendar folks Sirs:
> Perhaps you can explain your calendar >further?
I wonder is there after 48 years of media explainations: the FIRMAT has (1) Four equal quarters of 13-weeks each (91) days; (2) Thus has Two equal half years, each of 183 days (26-weeks+1 day); Any day of the week/year can be represented as W**-Day’s, first day of the year is W00-D01 (Jan.01) - like the format for ISO 8601-2004 etc.; (3) The Format can be used for Leap Day calendar, providing MY=(365+31/128)=365. 2421875 days; (4) This FORMAT can be used for Leap Week Calendar, Divide SIX(6) Plan, elaborately discussed with Calndr-L, using my 896-year cycle or 2*448=896-yrs getting Mean Year=7*(52+159/896)=7*(52+ 1/6+29/2688)=365.2421875 days; (5) The Format Calendar. Be used for 3*400-years & Divide Six Plan, providing Mean Year= 7*52+1/6+13/1200 =365.2425 days, during correcting histriographic dates in JC/GC dates; (6) Moreso, Year ‘0000’ can be included in history dates from 14*128+Y1792 or 15*128=Y1920 and counting of dating can include ‘start date’ of Kali Yuga 3102 BC-02- 17/18 (midnight). 
 I had asked a QUESTION: “Adding a small period of time 0.49287326 day (self absorbing over about a Cycle of Precession) - like I demonstrated in my calculation for [(448*365.242188669781)+0.49287326/ 5541Moons=29.53058886 day] not valid calculation for getting alignment with current ‘Moon to Moon’ period? 
Be kind to let me know, if more explaining is needed.
Regards, 
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:23 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 18:20, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

It is true that a year of 364 days, plus one day, plus another during Leap Year, is symmetrical. Perhaps you can explain your calendar further?

Jamison

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula, Jamison Cc sirs:
Is the reason for rejection of Gregorian Format of calendar ‘has been the issue’; I 
>That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.
have offered the solution - in HONOURING Pope Gregory XIII and his *asymmetrical format, converting it into SYMMETRICAL; moreso to the advantage of ‘humans born on February 29th (Every Year) to enjoy their 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1099/RAW" ?="" alt="image1.jpeg" id="B58496C7-755F-48CB-B245-F7B14F124579">
birth date, on shifting July 31* making the month of July to have 30 days (I place the Format again) to enlighten those experts who have as yet ignored to see its advantages?
This can comfortably be used for any options of 364-day years. December 31 & Leap Day are placed OUTSIDE of calendar format to be used as placing LD between June 30 and July 01; as also can be used as Leap Week calendar on *DIVIDE SIX(6) Plsn* also enhancing the Mean Year Value in my 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) capable to be aligned with CURENT duration of ‘dark moon to dark moon’. 
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 17:35, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

That is an interesting explanation. Your calendar probably has the most thought put into it of all the designed calendars I have seen here at Calendar-L. Can you explain what system you use for Leap Years?

Jamison

29 Germinal CCXXVII, Blueberrry

24 Archimides, 231,Vitruvius









Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jamison, Cakendar folks Sirs:
> Perhaps you can explain your calendar >further?
I wonder is there after 48 years of media explainations: the FIRMAT has (1) Four equal quarters of 13-weeks each (91) days; (2) Thus has Two equal half years, each of 183 days (26-weeks+1 day); Any day of the week/year can be represented as W**-Day’s, first day of the year is W00-D01 (Jan.01) - like the format for ISO 8601-2004 etc.; (3) The Format can be used for Leap Day calendar, providing MY=(365+31/128)=365. 2421875 days; (4) This FORMAT can be used for Leap Week Calendar, Divide SIX(6) Plan, elaborately discussed with Calndr-L, using my 896-year cycle or 2*448=896-yrs getting Mean Year=7*(52+159/896)=7*(52+ 1/6+29/2688)=365.2421875 days; (5) The Format Calendar. Be used for 3*400-years & Divide Six Plan, providing Mean Year= 7*52+1/6+13/1200 =365.2425 days, during correcting histriographic dates in JC/GC dates; (6) Moreso, Year ‘0000’ can be included in history dates from 14*128+Y1792 or 15*128=Y1920 and counting of dating can include ‘start date’ of Kali Yuga 3102 BC-02- 17/18 (midnight). 
 I had asked a QUESTION: “Adding a small period of time 0.49287326 day (self absorbing over about a Cycle of Precession) - like I demonstrated in my calculation for [(448*365.242188669781)+0.49287326/ 5541Moons=29.53058886 day] not valid calculation for getting alignment with current ‘Moon to Moon’ period? 
Be kind to let me know, if more explaining is needed.
Regards, 
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:23 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 18:20, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

It is true that a year of 364 days, plus one day, plus another during Leap Year, is symmetrical. Perhaps you can explain your calendar further?

Jamison

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula, Jamison Cc sirs:
Is the reason for rejection of Gregorian Format of calendar ‘has been the issue’; I 
>That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.
have offered the solution - in HONOURING Pope Gregory XIII and his *asymmetrical format, converting it into SYMMETRICAL; moreso to the advantage of ‘humans born on February 29th (Every Year) to enjoy their 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1099/RAW" ?="" alt="image1.jpeg" id="B58496C7-755F-48CB-B245-F7B14F124579">
birth date, on shifting July 31* making the month of July to have 30 days (I place the Format again) to enlighten those experts who have as yet ignored to see its advantages?
This can comfortably be used for any options of 364-day years. December 31 & Leap Day are placed OUTSIDE of calendar format to be used as placing LD between June 30 and July 01; as also can be used as Leap Week calendar on *DIVIDE SIX(6) Plsn* also enhancing the Mean Year Value in my 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) capable to be aligned with CURENT duration of ‘dark moon to dark moon’. 
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 17:35, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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Re: Designing a calendar

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Jamison Painter, all sirs:
>That is an interesting explanation. Your calendar probably has the most thought put into it of all the designed calendars I have >seen here at Calendar-L. Can you to remain aliveexplain >what system you use for Leap Years?
I feel elated and honored, for your words. I am a born Hindu but believe in HUMANISM, my life has been that of a soldier, not submitting till I had the will to find a way to remain ALIVE. I started for A World Cakendar for All Aged, as I said, since 1971 June 06 - The Sunday Tribune, Chandigarh and present this to HUMANITY, towards my honour to POPE GREGORY XIII whose calendar we all use. 
As you would see from the title, this is for United Nations to take up and forward it through their mission/Organisation to Representative Heads of Nations for their approval, pending which I remain satisfied that SOME DAY MY EFFORTS may sound sensible to ‘whatever slight modifications be needed’ to implement. This now is, and shall be my Proposal for Adoption as 
Brij-Gregorian Modified Calendar to United Nations. I have no Organisation or mission for who I have worked all these years, but GOD’s will for directing me to take up this research - a dream unrealised so far. This may now take the status of currently used Gregorian Calendar, having its Era linked to Year 0000, sirs!
I thank every one for rejecting ( to cause me to more sincere efforts), in making THIS WORK possible. To day is Thursday (W15-D04), the 18th Day of April 2019.
My regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Thursday, 2019 April 18H06:39 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 18, 2019, at 04:14, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

That is an interesting explanation. Your calendar probably has the most thought put into it of all the designed calendars I have seen here at Calendar-L. Can you explain what system you use for Leap Years?

Jamison

29 Germinal CCXXVII, Blueberrry

24 Archimides, 231,Vitruvius









Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jamison, Cakendar folks Sirs:
> Perhaps you can explain your calendar >further?
I wonder is there after 48 years of media explainations: the FIRMAT has (1) Four equal quarters of 13-weeks each (91) days; (2) Thus has Two equal half years, each of 183 days (26-weeks+1 day); Any day of the week/year can be represented as W**-Day’s, first day of the year is W00-D01 (Jan.01) - like the format for ISO 8601-2004 etc.; (3) The Format can be used for Leap Day calendar, providing MY=(365+31/128)=365. 2421875 days; (4) This FORMAT can be used for Leap Week Calendar, Divide SIX(6) Plan, elaborately discussed with Calndr-L, using my 896-year cycle or 2*448=896-yrs getting Mean Year=7*(52+159/896)=7*(52+ 1/6+29/2688)=365.2421875 days; (5) The Format Calendar. Be used for 3*400-years & Divide Six Plan, providing Mean Year= 7*52+1/6+13/1200 =365.2425 days, during correcting histriographic dates in JC/GC dates; (6) Moreso, Year ‘0000’ can be included in history dates from 14*128+Y1792 or 15*128=Y1920 and counting of dating can include ‘start date’ of Kali Yuga 3102 BC-02- 17/18 (midnight). 
 I had asked a QUESTION: “Adding a small period of time 0.49287326 day (self absorbing over about a Cycle of Precession) - like I demonstrated in my calculation for [(448*365.242188669781)+0.49287326/ 5541Moons=29.53058886 day] not valid calculation for getting alignment with current ‘Moon to Moon’ period? 
Be kind to let me know, if more explaining is needed.
Regards, 
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:23 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 18:20, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

It is true that a year of 364 days, plus one day, plus another during Leap Year, is symmetrical. Perhaps you can explain your calendar further?

Jamison

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula, Jamison Cc sirs:
Is the reason for rejection of Gregorian Format of calendar ‘has been the issue’; I 
>That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.
have offered the solution - in HONOURING Pope Gregory XIII and his *asymmetrical format, converting it into SYMMETRICAL; moreso to the advantage of ‘humans born on February 29th (Every Year) to enjoy their 
<img src="content://com.android.email.attachmentprovider/1/1099/RAW" ?="" alt="image1.jpeg" id="B58496C7-755F-48CB-B245-F7B14F124579">
birth date, on shifting July 31* making the month of July to have 30 days (I place the Format again) to enlighten those experts who have as yet ignored to see its advantages?
This can comfortably be used for any options of 364-day years. December 31 & Leap Day are placed OUTSIDE of calendar format to be used as placing LD between June 30 and July 01; as also can be used as Leap Week calendar on *DIVIDE SIX(6) Plsn* also enhancing the Mean Year Value in my 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) capable to be aligned with CURENT duration of ‘dark moon to dark moon’. 
Regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 17H18:18 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 17, 2019, at 17:35, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

I love symmetry. And as far as languages go, I am fluent in Castilian Spanish. I speak it as well as I do English. I have no problem with artificial languages, I simply don't think they can ever replace natural ones. I have some familiarity with Esperanto, but I am nowhere near fluent. I also have some knowledge of Latin and German.

As far as symmetry and calendars go, asymmetry is not particularly attractive in a calendar. That is one of the primary reasons I dislike the Gregorian Calendar. It just has no balance.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Jamison & Calendar People,

The way you described the Positivist Calendar, it reminds me of the calendar I started to design. 13 months of 28 days+an extra day; 2 extra days on a leap year. 

I happen to like the symmetry too.

I'm not a nit picky one who claims one calendar to be superior to all others-and I never was a fan of Esperanto either. I'd love to learn some of the "natural" languages such as Spanish, Arabic, Greek, etc. I also signed up for a sign language class, but I was kept from attending most of it. I only went to one class. I'm going to try again.

Paula

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

P.S. I happen to like pansies.



On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 4:49 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:

In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.

Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.

I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.

I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.

Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?

But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.

But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.

One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.

The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.

There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.

So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.

Regards,
Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.28 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
28♈13520 UCC

Hi Jamison (and others interested)

To answer your question about what I do with the blank days...

The Intercalary Days in the UCC form the 'Solar Cross' or 'Celtic Cross'
as shown at the top of the 'About' page on the website. They also all
form parts of Festivals. I celebrate the 'Eight Fold Year' with the
traditional Festivals of the Openings & Mid Points of the Quarters. The
Intercalary Days are all days within the 4 'Cardinal Festivals' of these
8 festive periods, and because these special days 'Celebrate' the
Equinoxes and Solstices they, and the actual equinox and solstice
occurrences always fall within the periods of the 4 Cardinal Festivals.

You can find this explained in various levels of detail on the UCC
Website at  http://universalcelestialcalendar.com.

The home page itself has a very high level summary of the structure of
the calendar.

The 'About' page has more detail and more graphics to help explain the
structure (see the 'About' link in the menu/header/banner at the top of
the home page. It is the first link on the left hand side of the menu
bar : http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/about.htm)

Then for even more detail there is the UCC Wiki. This also has a link at
the top of the home page via the Wiki icon at the right hand side of the
header/banner
(http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html)

If you scan through the menu of the wiki you will see headings regarding
all aspects of the calendar including Intercalary Days and Festivals. If
you don't find what you are looking for there please let me know and I
will direct you further.

I trust this helps with your understanding of the UCC but if you have
any further queries please let me know.

Peace, love and freedom

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

On 4/18/19 1:51 AM, Jamison Painter wrote:

> LITMUS:
>
> I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.
>
> Jamison
>
> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
>
> Litmus UCC <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> 27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>>
>> I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>> be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>>
>> Litmus
>>
>> Litmus A Freeman
>> Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>> http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>>
>> On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>>> PAULA:
>>>
>>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>>
>>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>>
>>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>>
>>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>>
>>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>>
>>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>>
>>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>>
>>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>>
>>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>>
>>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>>
>>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Jamison
>>>
>>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.28 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by sparkielee

28♈20 UCC

Hi Paula (and others interested)

Actually in the UCC we have 8 Festivals each year! Just as our ancestors did, and these closely align with the holiday times still celebrated to a lesser extent in the Gregorian calendar. What we find is that many people celebrate these times without actually realising their origins.

The Eight Festivals of 'The Eight Fold Year' celebrate the starts and mid points of each Quarter/Season. Nowadays they are known by such terms as "May Day" (this time actually having origins in Beltane/Mid Taurus♉/Mid Spring in the northern hemisphere) and "Halloween" (Samhain/Mid Scorpio♏/Mid Autumn or Fall in the northern hemisphere)

So rather than just 5 festival days there are actually 22! (23 in Leap Years)

And as I pointed out to Jamison; You can find these things explained in various levels of detail on the UCC Website at  http://universalcelestialcalendar.com.

The home page itself has a very high level summary of the structure of the calendar.

The 'About' page has more detail and more graphics to help explain the structure (see the 'About' link in the menu/header/banner at the top of the home page. It is the first link on the left hand side of the menu bar : http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/about.htm)

Then for even more detail there is the UCC Wiki. This also has a link at the top of the home page via the Wiki icon at the right hand side of the header/banner (http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html)

If you scan through the menu of the wiki you will see headings regarding all aspects of the calendar including Intercalary Days and Festivals.

The Intercalary Days are explained in the Wiki starting here: http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html#Intercalary_Days

And the Festivals here: http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html#Eight_Seasonal_Festivals

If you don't find what you are looking for there please let me know and I will direct you further.

Leap Year's Day

Regarding your question about the 6th/Leap Day and what we do with it. In the UCC I add this day in as 'Leap Year's Day' at the start of a Leap Year and it is counted as 'Day Zero' in order to keep the rest of the calendar days perennial.

This is explained in the 'About' section and also in the Wiki here: http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html#Leap_Years

and here: http://universalcelestialcalendar.com/Universal%20Community%20Calendar%20Wiki.backup.html#Leap_Year.27s_Day_.5B.E2.9C.B6.5D

Leap Year's Day then forms part of the first of the Eight Festivals of the year, as a 5th day of the 'New Year Cardinal Festival of Aries♈'

I trust this reply helps with your understanding of the UCC but if you have any further queries please let me know.

Peace, love and freedom

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
On 4/18/19 2:00 AM, Paula Spart wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC [hidden email] wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.28 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by sparkielee

28 ONE-Aries♈ 13520 UCC

Hi Again Paula! (and others interested)

Symbols for the Days of the Decan

As you know, in the UCC rather than 7 day weeks we have 10 Day periods called Decans. These celebrate the Sun and it's 9 main orbits. They can either be called Onesday, Twosday, Threesday etc (my preference) or take the name of their associated orbits working out from the Sun.

The symbols you see on the calendar are those of the Sun and the main Orbs which we find in the 9 planar orbits (these are the orbits around the Solar Equator and so do not include Pluto but do include Ceres in the asteroid belt). The 'male' and 'female' symbols you refer to are actually the symbols for the planets Mars ♂ and Venus ♀ respectively. If you'd like to know why these are used for masculine and feminine please let me know. (The answer is based in Esoteric Wisdom)

As you may know, the seven days of the week and their names in the Gregorian calendar derive from the Sun and the Moon and the 5 visible planets: Sun day, Moon day, Mars day, Mercury day, Jupiter day, Venus day and Saturn day respectively (if you'd like to know more about why they are in this order please let me know!). But there are actually 9 planar orbits and so in the UCC I put a day for each of them, including the asteroid belt, Uranus and Neptune.

We could also use the Geocentric model (which works from our perspective here on earth) to name the 10 days of the Decan, starting with the Moon ☽ as the fastest orbit, then Mercury ☿, then Venus ♀, the Sun ☉, Mars ♂, Ceres ⚳, Jupiter ♃, Saturn ♄, Uranus ♅ and Neptune ♆. *(for more on planets see note below)

Personally I just use the numbers, Onesday, Twosday etc, as when I first created the calendar it was purely number based and did not have the associated "astronomological" terms and symbols. The numbers work to keep the calendar perennial.

If you'd like to know more about the Decans and their days you can see more in the 'About' section and via the table of contents in the Wiki (I sent you the links on the previous email)

Triads (months)

Yes! As you point out, the 12 Triads include the name of their closely associated (Tropical) Zodiac Sign. The first part of the Triad name is the Number, ONE, TWO, THREE etc. and again this is because originally the calendar was purely number based. Once I realised how closely the structure aligned with the Tropical Zodiac I appended those names to each Triad. But as you quite rightly point out the UCC Triads don't precisely align with their associated zodiac signs. This would be impossible in a balanced solar calendar due to the nature of our orbit. We could distribute the Intercalary days differently to have a closer alignment but then the calendar wouldn't be symmetrical or balanced and wouldn't be so easy to work with.

But the Date in the UCC is always within a integer or two of the degree that the Sun is actually at on that day in that sign, so you can tell from your UCC birthdate where your Sun is in your astrological birth chart. For example my birth Sun is in the last degree of Gemini♊ and my UCC birthdate is 30th of THREE-Gemini♊.

Interestingly, our Solar Returns do not always occur on our Gregorian birthdays. My Gregorian birthday is 21st June, which is one of the intercalary days in the UCC (0 Cancer♋) and is usually the day that the Sun moves from the Sign of Gemini♊ into the Sign of Cancer♋. But of the 55 Solar Returns I have had so far in my life only 9 of them have fallen on 21st June in the Gregorian, whereas 54 of them have fallen on 30♊ in the UCC! (Since living by the UCC I celebrate my UCC Birthday on 30♊ and my Gregorian birthday on 0♋! :-))

But yes, if your birthday is close to a zodiac cusp, particularly in Q3 (Northern Autumn) you may find your it falls into the next UCC Triad, rather than the one actually associated with your Sun Sign, but generally they are pretty close.

Astrology

I never used to give this much credibility either, but since creating the UCC seven years ago, and then realising it closely aligned with the tropical Zodiac I have studied astrology in great depth. Now that I understand its principles much better I actually find a lot of merit in it and often now produce birth and life charts for my friends!

I trust this answers the points you raised, but if you have any further queries please let me know

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

*[As an aside - You may be aware that the three Abrahamic religions each have a "holy" planet and this determines their holy day of the seven day week. In Judaism it's Saturn ♄, hence their "holy" day being a "Saturn-day" - and some say "Sabbath" derives from this planet's name also. Also they start their day when the sun goes down and you can see the night sky.

In Christianity Jesus is a Sun ☉ symbol, hence their "holy" day is "Sun-day" and in Islam it is Venus ♀ and so their "holy" day is "Venus-day" (Friday in English). The "star" we see with the crescent Moon☽ on their flags is actually the planet Venus♀. You can see this effect when Venus is the "Evening Star" and hangs low in the sky near a new crescent (waxing) moon after sunset.]


On 4/18/19 2:25 AM, Paula Spart wrote:
Litmus,

I do see the similarity between the UCC and the FRC. However, I see symbols instead of the names of the days of the week. I recognize the one for male and the one for female, but I don't know what they or the others are called.

I see that you have the 10 day "weeks" like the FRC. And the months have the names of the zodiac signs too. If your birthday's under a certain sign, you were most likely born in the month named after that sign. For example, my birthday on the Gregorian calendar is December 8. A lot of people if they bring up the subject of "astrology" or "what's your sign?
They would either ask me when my birthday is and tell me I'm a "Sagittarius" or ask me what my sign is. If they ask me that, of course they want to hear whatever zodiac sign my birthday "falls under." I did notice that most "birthdays" in your month of Sagittarius are under that sign-even though I see a few Scorpio "birthdays" there too. I can understand it needs to be that way to form the perfect 10 day week and 3 week month-not to mention the symmetry.

I'm not going to lose any sleep over who's a Scorpio whose birthday's in the month of Sagittarius. I don't believe in astrology myself even though a lot of people like to talk about it and read their horoscopes.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 7:41 PM Litmus UCC [hidden email] wrote:
27 Aries♈13520 UCC

I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com

On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
> PAULA:
>
> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>
> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>
> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>
> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>
> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>
> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>
> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>
> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>
> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>
> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>
> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>
> Regards,
> Jamison
>
> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.28 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by sparkielee

28♈

Hey Paula

In the UCC it is Day Zero of Triad Zero and inserted between the last day of the previous year, New Year's Eve - 30 TWELVE-Pisces♓ (also usually the day of the Aries♈Equinox/Nobenox) and the first day of the following year, New Year's Day - 1 Zero.

And this happens at the start of Q1 (Northern Hemisphere Spring) - so the activity you chose to mark the event probably depends where you are on the planet and what your terrestrial seasons are like compared to the astronomical seasons!

PLaF

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
On 4/18/19 2:29 AM, Paula Spart wrote:
Maybe it can be a winter break or part of one for people in the United States, an extended "New Year's Eve" (don't drink and drive) or an invitation to come out of your warm homes and socialize.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 9:14 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The sixth day is Revolution. That Festival only occurs during Leap Years, and celebrates the French Revolution. Outside of France, it could celebrate the end of a different country's revolution, or the end of a civil war, or any other major date in that country's history.

Jamison

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC [hidden email] wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy
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13520.01.28 - Re: Designing a calendar

Litmus UCC
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter

28♈

Ha ha, in Cymru (Wales) we would celebrate having the islands to ourselves before the Anglo Saxon invasion! :D

Litmus

Litmus A Freeman
Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
On 4/18/19 2:48 AM, Jamison Painter wrote:
I am thinking we could celebrate the end of the American Civil War.

Jamison


On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Maybe it can be a winter break or part of one for people in the United States, an extended "New Year's Eve" (don't drink and drive) or an invitation to come out of your warm homes and socialize.

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 9:14 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The sixth day is Revolution. That Festival only occurs during Leap Years, and celebrates the French Revolution. Outside of France, it could celebrate the end of a different country's revolution, or the end of a civil war, or any other major date in that country's history.

Jamison

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm curious too. Maybe they can also be breaks from work-but you won't have a 5 day festival made up of intercalary days like you do with the FRC. I happen to like the qualities of the Republic which would justify the end of the year festival. It may be worth sacrificing some balance of the UCC, but what do we do with the 6th (or leap day) when it comes along?

Paula


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:51 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
LITMUS:

I totally agree that the UCC is very symmetrical, much like the FRC. The fact that the two calendars are similar in some respects, Decades and Decans, three per month, with the five blank days (six in Leap Year), explains this symmetry. Of course, you arrange your blank days differently than the FRC, which puts them at the end of the year. The Sans-culottides, Complementary Days, are dedicated to the qualities of the Republic. Virtue, Genius, Labour, Opinion, Honours, and Revolution (the last only during Leap Years), were each days given to honour those qualities in a Republic. They were designed to be treated as Festival Days, with National Celebrations, and every possible person relieved from work. I am still trying to figure out what you do with the blank days. Perhaps you can explain.

Jamison

28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy

Litmus UCC [hidden email] wrote:
>27 Aries♈13520 UCC
>
>I would (of course) add that "...in terms of symmetry..." the UCC would
>be a good calendar to consider! ;) And it is also expressly NON religious
>
>Litmus
>
>Litmus A Freeman
>Creator of the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
>http://universalcelestialcalendar.com
>
>On 4/17/19 9:49 PM, Jamison Painter wrote:
>> PAULA:
>>
>> In designing a calendar, there are, as you have guessed, quite a few variables to consider. Auguste Comte designed a calendar very similar to what you have proposed. In fact, his calendar, and his "Religion of Humanity" had considerable influence on the development of Brazil, even though he was French.
>>
>> Unlike Michael, I prefer to have months in my calendar, because it situates a date more clearly in one's mind. Furthermore, it is aesthetically more pleasing. The Gregorian Calendar is just that. One can add the word "Roman" to it, but it becomes a mouthful to say what is already obvious.
>>
>> I encourage you in developing your own calendar. I don't do that myself. Instead, I generally study historical calendars, made for religious, or in the case of the FRC, expressly NON-religious, purpose. I don't so much examine accounting calendars, like the ISO Week-Date calendar, or other week-Date calendars that Michael argues for, simply because they have no real place outside of accounting books. They don't actually effect people's lives in any real way.
>>
>> I certainly would never make use of Esperanto, which was designed by an internationalist with Communist sympathies (which is interesting, since the Communist states used to be hard on Esperantists). I don't believe in internationalism per se, except the internationalist idea that strong nations like Britain, France, Germany, and the USA rule weaker regions as colonies. This is the right and just way for the universe to work. Now that the former colonies are independent, and struggling to survive, I say, let them destroy themselves from within, and then go back in and rule, as is our destiny as a superior civilisation.
>>
>> Michael brought up the whole White Man's Burden. I have read the poem, and I actually think there is a lot to admire in it. Rudyard Kipling was an unabashed imperialist. So am I. What's the problem?
>>
>> But, back on calendars. I don't think any one calendar is necessarily any better than another. Some, like Auguste Comte's Positivist Calendar, or the French Republican Calendar, have greater symmetry than others. If one considers that aesthetically more pleasing than calendars without such symmetry (the Gregorian, as one of many examples), as I do, then one will naturally be drawn to such symmetry.
>>
>> But the fundamental purpose of a calendar is to be accurate. Most calendars achieve this, or they would not continue in use. The Julian Calendar is now only used by some Churches, but no Governments are using it, because it is inaccurate.
>>
>> One of the few bad things about imperialism is that it gave us the GC. Though the GC is accurate (and could be made even more accurate by changing the Leap Year rule [and there are quite a few ideas out there that would do that] to account for the exact amount of time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun [365.2425 days]), the calendar has a lot of faults. One is its lack of symmetry. Looking at the length of months you have 31, 28 or 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, and 31. It really is extremely asymmetrical.
>>
>> The Positivist Calendar of Comte is 13 months of 28 days plus one day (two in Leap Years). The FRC is twelve months of 30 days, plus five days (6 in Leap Year). Both are much more symmetrical than the GC. There are quite a few other calendars that have their strengths and weaknesses. The most accurate is the Persian Solar Hijri Calendar. The Revised Julian Calendar in use by some Churches is second on the list of currently used calendars for accuracy. The FRC would be equally as accurate as the Persian Calendar if used according to the visual sighting of the Autumnal Equinox from the Observatory at Paris. The Persian Calendar depends on astronomical sighting from a spot somewhat to the East (I think) of Tehran. Unfortunately, these can be hard methods to use, but they are accurate.
>>
>> There is another calendar in use by the Baha'is, who originated in Iran during the 19th Century. It has 19 months of 19 days each for 361 days, plus four more intercalary days (five in Leap Year). It begins on the day of the Vernal Equinox in Tehran, Iran, about 20 or 21 March. To determine when the Equinox is, astronomical tables from reliable sources are used.
>>
>> So I would suggest that, in terms of symmetry, either the Positivist Calendar, the FRC, or the Baha'i Calendar would be good candidates. In reality, is calendar reform going to happen? No. Not a chance of it. The Gregorian Calendar works. That is what matters to most people. They are familiar with it. Learning a new calendar just isn't worth the time and effort to most people. Nevertheless, we should continue to keep the issue in people's minds. Just because it doesn't look likely, doesn't mean that it is impossible. And by ALL means embrace a different calendar if you like. I have (the FRC). Adopting the FRC for personal purposes. has enabled me to reschedule my life. It has worked for me.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jamison
>>
>> 28 Germinal CCXXVII, Pansy


--
"You must be the change you want to see in the world."

Mahatma Gandhi

12