Chinese New Year

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Chinese New Year

Irv Bromberg
Tomorrow is Chinese New Year, the year in the 60-year cycle is ding-you, which I have translated in Kalendis as Fire-Chicken. I see others translate as Rooster instead of Chicken.

In transliterated Japanese I have the year as tei/hinoto-yu/tori, in Korean as Jung-Yoo, and in Vietnamese as Dinh-Dâu, all of which are also shown in Kalendis as Fire-Chicken in English. Tomorrow is the New Year Day for all of these oriental calendars.

Which is the more appropriate translation: Chicken or Rooster?

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

http://www.sym454.org/kalendis/
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Re: Chinese New Year

Jim Riley-4
Maybe because in English, "chicken" is something you eat or is a
pejorative adjective. English speakers may also refer to hens as
"chickens", where a rooster is clearly a live animal.

Rooster might be a better idiomatic translation, though also
misleading. This next year is a yin year. Chicken could be the better
literal translation, but not understood.

Incidentally, I just learned that hens-and-chickens is not the correct
name for the plant.

There might be similar problems with rats and snakes, but perhaps
since they are more exotic they get a pass.

On Fri, 27 Jan 2017 15:36:25 +0000, Irv Bromberg
<[hidden email]> wrote:

>Tomorrow is Chinese New Year, the year in the 60-year cycle is ding-you, which I have translated in Kalendis as Fire-Chicken. I see others translate as Rooster instead of Chicken.
>
>In transliterated Japanese I have the year as tei/hinoto-yu/tori, in Korean as Jung-Yoo, and in Vietnamese as Dinh-Dâu, all of which are also shown in Kalendis as Fire-Chicken in English. Tomorrow is the New Year Day for all of these oriental calendars.
>
>Which is the more appropriate translation: Chicken or Rooster?
--
Jim Riley
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Re: Chinese New Year

Irv Bromberg
In reply to this post by Irv Bromberg
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of Irv Bromberg [[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2017 10:36

Tomorrow is Chinese New Year, the year in the 60-year cycle is ding-you, which I have translated in Kalendis as Fire-Chicken. I see others translate as Rooster instead of Chicken.

Which is the more appropriate translation: Chicken or Rooster?


I answer my own question: Based on Google Translate, entering English "chicken" or "rooster" and then having it pronounce the Chinese translation, it appears that "chicken" is the correct translation.

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

http://www.sym454.org/kalendis/