Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

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Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Christoph Päper-2
Dear calendarists

I just stumbled across Dave Gorman’s proposal for a 13 × 4 weeks + 1 day calendar, delivered as  part of a stand-up comedy act (and possibly also featured in a book of his).

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcMTHr3TqA0>

I'm not sure how serious he (or anyone) is about this, and due to the flaws in the design do not care much either, but the 10-minute video actually deals with many common pro and con arguments in an almost accurate and entertaining manner – at least the Easter pun got me grinning.
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Re: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Phil De Rosa
Thank you Christoph for making my day with the 10 minute video of Dave
Gorman's proposal for calendar reform.  Really worth a watch.

Phil De Rosa

White Rock, BC, canada

-----Original Message-----
From: Christoph Päper
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 5:53 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Dear calendarists

I just stumbled across Dave Gorman’s proposal for a 13 × 4 weeks + 1 day
calendar, delivered as  part of a stand-up comedy act (and possibly also
featured in a book of his).

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcMTHr3TqA0>

I'm not sure how serious he (or anyone) is about this, and due to the flaws
in the design do not care much either, but the 10-minute video actually
deals with many common pro and con arguments in an almost accurate and
entertaining manner – at least the Easter pun got me grinning.
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Re: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Karl Palmen
Dear Christoph and Calendar People

I enjoyed watching the video last night and it started with the idea that month is a unit of time lasting 28 days. This led to a calendar with 13 months of 28 days following by an intermission of one or two days, occurring between Saturday and Sunday, so every month begins on a Sunday and has a Friday 13th.

The months & intermission begin of the following days of the Gregorian Calendar year, where '-' indicates one day earlier in a leap year

March: Jan 1
April: Jan 29
May: Feb 26
June: Mar 26-
Quintilis: Apr 23-
Sextilis: May 21-
September: Jun 18-
October: Jul 16-
November: Aug 13-
December: Sep 10-
January: Oct 8-
February: Nov 5-
Gormanary: Dec 3-
Intermission: Dec 31-

The issue of Birthdays and Holidays was addressed in response to a question, with each such occasion occurring the same number of days after the new year on a different date.

He could have shifted the new year to Gregorian March 1st, but it would not be so funny then.

Karl

16(05(16

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Phil De Rosa
Sent: 12 January 2017 04:21
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Thank you Christoph for making my day with the 10 minute video of Dave
Gorman's proposal for calendar reform.  Really worth a watch.

Phil De Rosa

White Rock, BC, canada

-----Original Message-----
From: Christoph Päper
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 5:53 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Dear calendarists

I just stumbled across Dave Gorman’s proposal for a 13 × 4 weeks + 1 day
calendar, delivered as  part of a stand-up comedy act (and possibly also
featured in a book of his).

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcMTHr3TqA0>

I'm not sure how serious he (or anyone) is about this, and due to the flaws
in the design do not care much either, but the 10-minute video actually
deals with many common pro and con arguments in an almost accurate and
entertaining manner – at least the Easter pun got me grinning.
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Re: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Walter J Ziobro

Dear Karl and Calendar List

So, why doesn't he start the year in March?

Walter Ziobro

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail




On Friday, January 13, 2017 Karl Palmen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Christoph and Calendar People

I enjoyed watching the video last night and it started with the idea that month is a unit of time lasting 28 days. This led to a calendar with 13 months of 28 days following by an intermission of one or two days, occurring between Saturday and Sunday, so every month begins on a Sunday and has a Friday 13th.

The months & intermission begin of the following days of the Gregorian Calendar year, where '-' indicates one day earlier in a leap year

March: Jan 1
April: Jan 29
May: Feb 26
June: Mar 26-
Quintilis: Apr 23-
Sextilis: May 21-
September: Jun 18-
October: Jul 16-
November: Aug 13-
December: Sep 10-
January: Oct 8-
February: Nov 5-
Gormanary: Dec 3-
Intermission: Dec 31-

The issue of Birthdays and Holidays was addressed in response to a question, with each such occasion occurring the same number of days after the new year on a different date.

He could have shifted the new year to Gregorian March 1st, but it would not be so funny then.

Karl

16(05(16

-----Original Message-----
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:CALNDR-L@...] On Behalf Of Phil De Rosa
Sent: 12 January 2017 04:21
To: CALNDR-L@...
Subject: Re: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Thank you Christoph for making my day with the 10 minute video of Dave
Gorman's proposal for calendar reform. Really worth a watch.

Phil De Rosa

White Rock, BC, canada

-----Original Message-----
From: Christoph Päper
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 5:53 PM
To: CALNDR-L@...
Subject: Calendar Reform has hit UK Mainstream TV?

Dear calendarists

I just stumbled across Dave Gorman’s proposal for a 13 × 4 weeks + 1 day
calendar, delivered as part of a stand-up comedy act (and possibly also
featured in a book of his).

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcMTHr3TqA0>

I'm not sure how serious he (or anyone) is about this, and due to the flaws
in the design do not care much either, but the 10-minute video actually
deals with many common pro and con arguments in an almost accurate and
entertaining manner – at least the Easter pun got me grinning.