Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

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Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Amos Shapir-2
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


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Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Victor Engel
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Amos Shapir-2
This email originated from outside ECU.

Hi Victor and calendar people,

According to the article, the Earth's rotation is slowing down due to the tidal pull of the Moon; relative to that, changes of the sidereal length of the year are insignificant over this time span.

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 5:11 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Victor Engel
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

Yes, that is their theory, which is a well-known and accepted one. But they go one step further: to calculate the length of the year as 372 days by assuming that the length of the year is constant. That's what I question. Solar sails would not be possible were this not a real effect. I suppose the magnetic fields should also be considered. I don't know how significant they are, but over billions of years, I'm inclined to believe they're non-negligible.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:16 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Hi Victor and calendar people,

According to the article, the Earth's rotation is slowing down due to the tidal pull of the Moon; relative to that, changes of the sidereal length of the year are insignificant over this time span.

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 5:11 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Amos Shapir-2
This email originated from outside ECU.

Hi Victor and calendar people,

The authors cite the following research, which had calculated astronomical frequencies of the Earth and Moon for billions of years; it seems to have taken care of minor variables too:



On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 5:51 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

Yes, that is their theory, which is a well-known and accepted one. But they go one step further: to calculate the length of the year as 372 days by assuming that the length of the year is constant. That's what I question. Solar sails would not be possible were this not a real effect. I suppose the magnetic fields should also be considered. I don't know how significant they are, but over billions of years, I'm inclined to believe they're non-negligible.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:16 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Hi Victor and calendar people,

According to the article, the Earth's rotation is slowing down due to the tidal pull of the Moon; relative to that, changes of the sidereal length of the year are insignificant over this time span.

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 5:11 PM Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 


--
Amos Shapir
 


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Litmus A Freeman
In reply to this post by Victor Engel
This email originated from outside ECU.

28 Pisces♓ 13520 UCC

Dear Victor and others

Your reply brings to mind "Worlds In Collision" by Velokovski, which although trashed by the mainstream left brainers at the time (and apparently implausible under Keplers laws according to the physicists - although I've never seen the actual calculations) is still very well researched and put together and a crackin good read, and of course covers a lot of ground related to this topic

Litmus

-----------------------
Litmus A Freeman
Creator of 'The Free Man Calendar' - the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
www.freemancalendar.com
www.universalcelestialcalendar.com
On 3/10/20 3:11 PM, Victor Engel wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Victor Engel
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Calendar People,

I've had some time to think about this more since my last post, and I've sort of concluded to myself that the factors I mentioned are probably negligible compared to other factors. There's a wikipedia article on solar system stability. Among other things, it mentions, "In calculation, the unknowns include asteroids, the solar quadrupole moment, mass loss from the Sun through radiation and solar wind, drag of solar wind on planetary magnetospheres, galactic tidal forces, and effects from passing stars."

The main point I was making, though, was that the assumption that the revolution period of Earth is constant may not be a valid assumption, for whatever reason.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 17, 2020 at 2:38 PM Litmus UCC Zone <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

28 Pisces♓ 13520 UCC

Dear Victor and others

Your reply brings to mind "Worlds In Collision" by Velokovski, which although trashed by the mainstream left brainers at the time (and apparently implausible under Keplers laws according to the physicists - although I've never seen the actual calculations) is still very well researched and put together and a crackin good read, and of course covers a lot of ground related to this topic

Litmus

-----------------------
Litmus A Freeman
Creator of 'The Free Man Calendar' - the Universal Celestial Calendar (UCC)
www.freemancalendar.com
www.universalcelestialcalendar.com
On 3/10/20 3:11 PM, Victor Engel wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

Dear Amos and Calendar People,

"The length of a year has been constant over Earth’s history, because Earth’s orbit around the Sun does not change."

An assumption that deserves to be tested. What could change the length of year? Collisions with other bodies. The flux of solar wind. What else? Perhaps these are all insignificant.

Victor

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:02 AM Amos Shapir <[hidden email]> wrote:
This email originated from outside ECU.

This may interest some members of this list, especially those who intend to create a calendar fo dinosaurs, or to figure out when we'll get rid of leap years altogether.

70 million years ago, the year had 372 days, because days were shorter.  The article mentions that the moon cycle was also different, but doesn't say by how much.


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: Ancient shell shows days were half-hour shorter 70 million years ago

Michael H Deckers
This email originated from outside ECU.


    On 2020-03-17 20:24, Victor Engel wrote about the

    secular deceleration of the Earth's rotation:



> The main point I was making, though, was that the assumption that the revolution period of Earth is constant may not be a valid assumption, for whatever reason.

f


     It is not even constant now; the question is whether its
     value is bounded or not. If I remember correctly, the
     solar system is chaotic with a Lefshetz exponent of
     the order 1/(several ten million years).

     But the best proof that the parameters of the Earth's
     orbit (and rotation) cannot have varied too much over
     the past several hundred million years is the development
     of life on Earth: several slight climatic changes have
     caused large extinctions, so that a substantial change
     in the orbit of the Earth would have destroyed life
     completely.

     Michael Deckers.