Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

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Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

Karl Palmen

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

It looks like the Dominical letters for the years of a Julian 28-year cycle, but the dominical letters would have a reverse sequence and the leap years would have two letters (one for Jan Feb and one for the other months). This I show later on.

 

It seems that the letters correspond to a years beginning with March 1 on a particular day of the week. For the Julian calendar numbering years in AD, the day of week of March 1 would be as follows:

A  Tuesday

B  Wednesday

C  Thursday

D  Friday

E  Saturday

F  Sunday

G Monday

If years were numbered differently from AD the letters would probably correspond to different days of the week.

 

It does not work for the Gregorian Calendar because the year begins on January 1st and so leap years would require two letters. If years were modified to begin March 1, then the days of the week the letters correspond to would depend on the century.

 

For Dominical letters and years beginning January 1 and AD year counting we’d have

 

B A G FE

D C B AG

F E D CB

A G F ED

C B A GF

E D C BA

G F E CD

 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominical_letter .

 

Karl

 

13(08(13

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 07:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This ancient calendar table allows to determine the Julian and Gregorian calendar for any year.

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Brij Bhushan Vij
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 1:52 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Vladimir Pokhomir sir(s):
(from the document :
http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html )
>.....This gives an error of 1 day in 128-years?
This only gives (3x365+366) :4 =365.25 days.
How does it give Mean Years of (365+31/128) i.e. 1 day in 128 years?


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Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

Vladimir Pakhomov-2

This table works for the Gregorian calendar, too.

For leap years are not required two letters.

A Friday

B Saturday

C Sunday

D Monday

E Tuesday

F Wednesday

G Thursday

Calendrical calculations are shown on page

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:11 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

It looks like the Dominical letters for the years of a Julian 28-year cycle, but the dominical letters would have a reverse sequence and the leap years would have two letters (one for Jan Feb and one for the other months). This I show later on.

 

It seems that the letters correspond to a years beginning with March 1 on a particular day of the week. For the Julian calendar numbering years in AD, the day of week of March 1 would be as follows:

A  Tuesday

B  Wednesday

C  Thursday

D  Friday

E  Saturday

F  Sunday

G Monday

If years were numbered differently from AD the letters would probably correspond to different days of the week.

 

It does not work for the Gregorian Calendar because the year begins on January 1st and so leap years would require two letters. If years were modified to begin March 1, then the days of the week the letters correspond to would depend on the century.

 

For Dominical letters and years beginning January 1 and AD year counting we’d have

 

B A G FE

D C B AG

F E D CB

A G F ED

C B A GF

E D C BA

G F E CD

 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominical_letter .

 

Karl

 

13(08(13

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 07:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This ancient calendar table allows to determine the Julian and Gregorian calendar for any year.

 

 

Vladimir

 

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Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

Karl Palmen

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 19:58
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This table works for the Gregorian calendar, too.

For leap years are not required two letters.

 

 

A Friday

B Saturday

C Sunday

D Monday

E Tuesday

F Wednesday

G Thursday

 

This table is not valid for all centuries or for January and February in a leap year, unless special provision is made for them.

 

Calendrical calculations are shown on page

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

This only uses the Julian calendar March style for which leap years do not require two letters and the table is valid for all centuries.

It does not seem to explain, why leap years do not require two letters, for January starting years.

 

Then I thought of a way of making the original Julian calendar table valid for the Gregorian Calendar, but with March starting years.

For March 2100 to February 2200, the Julian calendar is exactly two weeks behind and so the same table would work for both calendars then.

For each time February 29 is dropped, in a year that is a leap year in the Julian calendar, skip 16 years in the 28-year cycle.

So for March 1900 to February 2100, one can use the Julian calendar table, but with the 28-year cycle running 16 years later or 12 years earlier than in the Julian calendar.

 

For example 2013 has remainder 28 when divided by 25 so is C in the table, putting March 1 on Thursday.

In the Gregorian, the 29-year cycle is running 16 years late so it is 9 in the 28-year cycle so D in the table, putting March 1 on Friday, as I remember.

 

Karl

 

13(08(14

 

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:11 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

It looks like the Dominical letters for the years of a Julian 28-year cycle, but the dominical letters would have a reverse sequence and the leap years would have two letters (one for Jan Feb and one for the other months). This I show later on.

 

It seems that the letters correspond to a years beginning with March 1 on a particular day of the week. For the Julian calendar numbering years in AD, the day of week of March 1 would be as follows:

A  Tuesday

B  Wednesday

C  Thursday

D  Friday

E  Saturday

F  Sunday

G Monday

If years were numbered differently from AD the letters would probably correspond to different days of the week.

 

It does not work for the Gregorian Calendar because the year begins on January 1st and so leap years would require two letters. If years were modified to begin March 1, then the days of the week the letters correspond to would depend on the century.

 

For Dominical letters and years beginning January 1 and AD year counting we’d have

 

B A G FE

D C B AG

F E D CB

A G F ED

C B A GF

E D C BA

G F E CD

 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominical_letter .

 

Karl

 

13(08(13

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 07:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This ancient calendar table allows to determine the Julian and Gregorian calendar for any year.

 

 

Vladimir

 


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Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

Vladimir Pakhomov-2

Karl, you are wrong.

March 1, 2013 of the Julian calendar was Thursday. OK.

March 1, 2013 of the Julian calendar corresponds to March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar (1+13=14).

Therefore, March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar was Thursday. Check it out!

If you have determined the day of the week for March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar, so you have determined the Gregorian calendar for 2013.

See "The Calendar Calculations" on webpage

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5:01 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 19:58
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This table works for the Gregorian calendar, too.

For leap years are not required two letters.

 

 

A Friday

B Saturday

C Sunday

D Monday

E Tuesday

F Wednesday

G Thursday

 

This table is not valid for all centuries or for January and February in a leap year, unless special provision is made for them.

 

Calendrical calculations are shown on page

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

This only uses the Julian calendar March style for which leap years do not require two letters and the table is valid for all centuries.

It does not seem to explain, why leap years do not require two letters, for January starting years.

 

Then I thought of a way of making the original Julian calendar table valid for the Gregorian Calendar, but with March starting years.

For March 2100 to February 2200, the Julian calendar is exactly two weeks behind and so the same table would work for both calendars then.

For each time February 29 is dropped, in a year that is a leap year in the Julian calendar, skip 16 years in the 28-year cycle.

So for March 1900 to February 2100, one can use the Julian calendar table, but with the 28-year cycle running 16 years later or 12 years earlier than in the Julian calendar.

 

For example 2013 has remainder 28 when divided by 25 so is C in the table, putting March 1 on Thursday.

In the Gregorian, the 29-year cycle is running 16 years late so it is 9 in the 28-year cycle so D in the table, putting March 1 on Friday, as I remember.

 

Karl

 

13(08(14

 

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:11 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

It looks like the Dominical letters for the years of a Julian 28-year cycle, but the dominical letters would have a reverse sequence and the leap years would have two letters (one for Jan Feb and one for the other months). This I show later on.

 

It seems that the letters correspond to a years beginning with March 1 on a particular day of the week. For the Julian calendar numbering years in AD, the day of week of March 1 would be as follows:

A  Tuesday

B  Wednesday

C  Thursday

D  Friday

E  Saturday

F  Sunday

G Monday

If years were numbered differently from AD the letters would probably correspond to different days of the week.

 

It does not work for the Gregorian Calendar because the year begins on January 1st and so leap years would require two letters. If years were modified to begin March 1, then the days of the week the letters correspond to would depend on the century.

 

For Dominical letters and years beginning January 1 and AD year counting we’d have

 

B A G FE

D C B AG

F E D CB

A G F ED

C B A GF

E D C BA

G F E CD

 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominical_letter .

 

Karl

 

13(08(13

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 07:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This ancient calendar table allows to determine the Julian and Gregorian calendar for any year.

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

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Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Vladimir, Karl sirs:
>.....March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar was Thursday. Check it out!
YES, it was a Thursday at MJD 2,456,366, and March 1, 2013 of the Julian calendar.
Again, MJD 2,456,364 was a DARK MOON, on Tuesday March 12, 2013. BUT, are we adding any newer knowledge to calendar-reform!
>See "The Calendar Calculations" on webpage: http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

ONE day error in 128-years is not expalined?? May I point that there is ONE day error between Julian & Gregorian calendars in 3200-years as shown by my 'several inputs/mails discussed with listserv.

Regards,

Brij Bhushan Vij
Thursday, 2013 April 25H17:07(decimal)EST
Aa Nau Bhadra Kritvo Yantu Vishwatah -Rg Veda
The Astronomical Poem (revised number of days in any month)
"30 days has July,September,
April, June, November and December
all the rest have 31 except February which has 29
except on years divisible evenly by 4;
except when YEAR divisible by 128 and 3200 -
as long as you remember that
"October (meaning 8) is the 10th month; and
December (meaning 10) is the 12th BUT has 30 days & ONE
OUTSIDE of calendar-format"
Jan:31; Feb:29; Mar:31; Apr:30; May:31; Jun:30
Jul:30; Aug:31; Sep:30; Oct:31; Nov:30; Dec:30
(365th day of Year is World Day)
******As per Kali V-GRhymeCalendaar*****
"Koi bhi cheshtha vayarth nahin hoti, purshaarth karne mein hai"
My Profile - http://www.brijvij.com/bbv_2col-vipBrief.pdf
Author had NO interaction with The World Calendar Association
except via Media & Organisations to who I contributed for A
Possible World Calendar, since 1971.
HOME PAGE: http://www.brijvij.com/
Contact via E-mail: [hidden email] OR
"GAYATRI LOK"  Flat # 3013/3rd Floor
NH-58, Kankhal Bypass, Dev-Bhoomi, HARIDWAR-249408 (Uttrakhand - INDIA)

 

Date: Thu, 25 Apr 2013 10:21:36 +0400
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars
To: [hidden email]

Karl, you are wrong.

March 1, 2013 of the Julian calendar was Thursday. OK.

March 1, 2013 of the Julian calendar corresponds to March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar (1+13=14).

Therefore, March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar was Thursday. Check it out!

If you have determined the day of the week for March 14, 2013 of the Gregorian calendar, so you have determined the Gregorian calendar for 2013.

See "The Calendar Calculations" on webpage

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5:01 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 19:58
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This table works for the Gregorian calendar, too.

For leap years are not required two letters.

 

 

A Friday

B Saturday

C Sunday

D Monday

E Tuesday

F Wednesday

G Thursday

 

This table is not valid for all centuries or for January and February in a leap year, unless special provision is made for them.

 

Calendrical calculations are shown on page

http://www.pakhomov.com/calendar.html

This only uses the Julian calendar March style for which leap years do not require two letters and the table is valid for all centuries.

It does not seem to explain, why leap years do not require two letters, for January starting years.

 

Then I thought of a way of making the original Julian calendar table valid for the Gregorian Calendar, but with March starting years.

For March 2100 to February 2200, the Julian calendar is exactly two weeks behind and so the same table would work for both calendars then.

For each time February 29 is dropped, in a year that is a leap year in the Julian calendar, skip 16 years in the 28-year cycle.

So for March 1900 to February 2100, one can use the Julian calendar table, but with the 28-year cycle running 16 years later or 12 years earlier than in the Julian calendar.

 

For example 2013 has remainder 28 when divided by 25 so is C in the table, putting March 1 on Thursday.

In the Gregorian, the 29-year cycle is running 16 years late so it is 9 in the 28-year cycle so D in the table, putting March 1 on Friday, as I remember.

 

Karl

 

13(08(14

 

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:11 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Ancient Calendar Table RE: ... RE: Sliding and table calendars

 

Dear Vladimir and Calendar People

 

It looks like the Dominical letters for the years of a Julian 28-year cycle, but the dominical letters would have a reverse sequence and the leap years would have two letters (one for Jan Feb and one for the other months). This I show later on.

 

It seems that the letters correspond to a years beginning with March 1 on a particular day of the week. For the Julian calendar numbering years in AD, the day of week of March 1 would be as follows:

A  Tuesday

B  Wednesday

C  Thursday

D  Friday

E  Saturday

F  Sunday

G Monday

If years were numbered differently from AD the letters would probably correspond to different days of the week.

 

It does not work for the Gregorian Calendar because the year begins on January 1st and so leap years would require two letters. If years were modified to begin March 1, then the days of the week the letters correspond to would depend on the century.

 

For Dominical letters and years beginning January 1 and AD year counting we’d have

 

B A G FE

D C B AG

F E D CB

A G F ED

C B A GF

E D C BA

G F E CD

 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominical_letter .

 

Karl

 

13(08(13

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Vladimir Pakhomov
Sent: 23 April 2013 07:41
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: divide 4/400 vs divide 4/128th yearsRE: Sliding and table calendars

 

This ancient calendar table allows to determine the Julian and Gregorian calendar for any year.

 

 

Vladimir

 

 

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