Analog "Date Clock" free online.

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Analog "Date Clock" free online.

dateclock
Analog layers of date and time. An holistic horologe of cyclic progression.

https://dateclock.net/

Cheers.

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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Irv Bromberg
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of Date Clock [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 17:19

Analog layers of date and time. An holistic horologe of cyclic progression.

https://dateclock.net/


That's a very nice 24-hour analog clock, but it's upside-down!
The zero counts belong at the bottom, so that the hour hand will more or less always point at the solar hour angle, with midnight at the bottom and noon at the top.
I've seen analog clocks where zero hours are at the bottom but all other counts have zero at the top, but for consistency that makes no sense, all zeros should go at the bottom.

Oh, wait, now I see that "Sundial" isn't like a sundial readout, but it is the same analog time display with the zeros at the bottom -- hurray!
How about using labels like "0 at Top" and "0 at Bottom" instead of "Clock" and "Sundial"?

Very smooth motion of the seconds hand.

Hover over the digital display to see the corresponding indicator hand highlighted on the analog clock, and the gray shade of each part of the digital display matches the gray shade of the corresponding analog hand.

It's interesting to see month and day numbers in an analog format, because they advance fractionally along the dial -- I suppose that the day-of-month dial gains or loses digits and changes its angular rate of motion appropriately when the month has other than 30 days.

It looks like every Sunday is boldfaced on the day-of-month dial, so one can also reckon the weekday from this clock.

It would be nice to add shaded indicators for night duration and daytime duration, based on sunrise and sunset, but is it possible to automatically get the necessary locale information (latitude, longitude, elevation) to make that calculation possible?

The dial hands are relatively wide -- can you make the dial hands slightly translucent so that obscured dial digits are still readable?

--- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

http://www.sym454.org/
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

dateclock
Thanks for your interest. Please share the clock with others who may hold
interest.

Yes, I prefer origins at the bottom, myself, but I find most folk expect
them at the top initially (most modern 24-hour watches seem to be sold that
way, too).

"0 at Top/Bottom" wouldn't quite be correct, since some dials begin with one
(days, months), of course. Single words were selected to maintain the
toggles' legibility (especially important on phones).

The "seconds" hand updates every 40 milliseconds. This speed was chosen by
eyeball trial-and-error.

Glad you found the hover/tap supertitles. Did you discover them, or did you
read the instructions in the hamburger button (top-left corner) first, may I
ask?

Yes, in order to keep the dial pips evenly spaced (and the code simpler),
different months will spin at slightly different rates.

Every Sunday this month is bold-faced by coincidence. The actual pattern is
the initial pip is bold (like the other dials), and then every seven
day-pips is bold thereafter. Every seven days is bold because there are
seven days in a week, there're approximately seven days in a lunar quarter,
and to correlate roughly with the 90-degree–based bolding on the months'
dial. It looks best in February (set your system clock, or input a JS Date
object to `dateclock.set()` in the browser console).

Sunrise and sunset shading… That's a taller order. I'd need to store a data
table or call outward to one, and I'd need to query the browser client or
human user for a location. It's possible to do, but it's far more than I
wish to do presently.

The hands' width are challenging in that there are five of them, and they
must look legible on large and tiny screens. Transparency would increase CPU
usage (more work for the browser to paint). I also considered pointier
shapes for the hands, but that also pushed the CPU too hard. And I briefly
considered putting the numbers above the hands, but that looked unnatural.
Also, I don't even read the numbers after a while, I've become so familiar
with the fractions. To me, it's more a quick feeling conveyed of "we're
presently a quarter through the year, nearly an eighth through the month,
just over five eighths through the day, etc.

Thanks very much for look and talking.




--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Irv Bromberg
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of dateclock [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 19:42

Thanks for your interest. Please share the clock with others who may hold interest.

Glad to -- I have a long-standing interest in this style of clock. Some of these features, and others, are available in the Yes watch, but it is very strange that the costly Yes watch can't compute beyond the year 2100. So much for passing it on as an heirloom... http://www.yeswatch.com/

Yes, I prefer origins at the bottom, myself, but I find most folk expect them at the top initially (most modern 24-hour watches seem to be sold that way, too).

Good point.

"0 at Top/Bottom" wouldn't quite be correct, since some dials begin with one (days, months), of course. Single words were selected to maintain the toggles' legibility (especially important on phones).

Yes, I realized those problems. I'm amazed that your date clock very nicely resizes on different monitor sizes, with the control buttons moving around as necessary, and even does this if the user interactively changes the window dimensions.

The "seconds" hand updates every 40 milliseconds. This speed was chosen by eyeball trial-and-error.

Would be nice to have the option to switch the seconds display on/off, to reduce distraction when working on one monitor while date clock is running on the other monitor. I'm amazed that when the clock is displayed on a good size monitor the user can discern the minutes hand incrementally moving each second or so, although I must admit that the changing visibility of the "jaggies" along the tilted minutes hand, depending on the angle, makes this more conspicuous. Are you anti-aliasing those "jaggies"?

Seeing the minutes hand moving is one reason why I don't feel the need to see the seconds.


Glad you found the hover/tap supertitles. Did you discover them, or did you read the instructions in the hamburger button (top-left corner) first, may I ask?

I discovered those on my own, but after scanning through the hamburger button text, which I mostly ignored because it so happened that the words were very big and the text column very narrow on the display that I was using at first.

Yes, in order to keep the dial pips evenly spaced (and the code simpler), different months will spin at slightly different rates.

Every Sunday this month is bold-faced by coincidence. The actual pat tern isthe initial pip is bold (like the other dials), and then every seven day-pips is bold thereafter. Every seven days is bold because there are
seven days in a week, there're approximately seven days in a lunar quarter, and to correlate roughly with the 90-degree–based bolding on the months' dial. It looks best in February (set your system clock, or input a JS Date object to `dateclock.set()` in the browser console).

Well, if there was an option to depict my Symmetry454 date then boldfacing every Monday would make sense. Would 35-day months be a problem? On the month dial there probably isn't enough room to show the leap week at end of year as a 13th mini-month. http://www.sym454.org/symmetry/

Sunrise and sunset shading… That's a taller order. I'd need to store a data table or call outward to one, and I'd need to query the browser client or human user for a location. It's possible to do, but it's far more than I wish to do presently.

On a SmartPhone there usually should be an API to get the current locale coordinates, which are needed at dateclock launch and perhaps occasionally thereafter.

The hands' width are challenging in that there are five of them, and they must look legible on large and tiny screens. Transparency would increase CPU usage (more work for the browser to paint). I also considered pointier shapes for the hands, but that also pushed the CPU too hard. And I briefly considered putting the numbers above the hands, but that looked unnatural. Also, I don't even read the numbers after a while, I've become so familiar with the fractions. To me, it's more a quick feeling conveyed of "we're presently a quarter through the year, nearly an eighth through the month, just over five eighths through the day, etc.

I see.

I haven't yet understood what the lunar date clock is showing me. Perhaps that's because counting the month numbers since the south solstice is of no interest to me, but I expect that East Asians intuitively find it to be relevant. Perhaps an analog view of Hebrew dates, where Nisan is the first month?


Thanks very much for look and talking.

I like how you resisted using colours. The gray shading is novel, and classy. I like the Dark view.

-- Irv
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Irv Bromberg
About the Yes watch I could add that its use of tritium tubes as the dial indicators for glow-in-the-dark adds another dimension of premature obsolescence, since tritium has a half-life of less than 12+1/3 years. With just half of the glow gone, it will be nearly useless. Currently it is impractical for manufacturers to ship replacement tritium-containing clock dials internationally.


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of Irv Bromberg [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 23:35
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of dateclock [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 19:42

Thanks for your interest. Please share the clock with others who may hold interest.

Glad to -- I have a long-standing interest in this style of clock. Some of these features, and others, are available in the Yes watch, but it is very strange that the costly Yes watch can't compute beyond the year 2100. So much for passing it on as an heirloom... http://www.yeswatch.com/

Yes, I prefer origins at the bottom, myself, but I find most folk expect them at the top initially (most modern 24-hour watches seem to be sold that way, too).

Good point.

"0 at Top/Bottom" wouldn't quite be correct, since some dials begin with one (days, months), of course. Single words were selected to maintain the toggles' legibility (especially important on phones).

Yes, I realized those problems. I'm amazed that your date clock very nicely resizes on different monitor sizes, with the control buttons moving around as necessary, and even does this if the user interactively changes the window dimensions.

The "seconds" hand updates every 40 milliseconds. This speed was chosen by eyeball trial-and-error.

Would be nice to have the option to switch the seconds display on/off, to reduce distraction when working on one monitor while date clock is running on the other monitor. I'm amazed that when the clock is displayed on a good size monitor the user can discern the minutes hand incrementally moving each second or so, although I must admit that the changing visibility of the "jaggies" along the tilted minutes hand, depending on the angle, makes this more conspicuous. Are you anti-aliasing those "jaggies"?

Seeing the minutes hand moving is one reason why I don't feel the need to see the seconds.


Glad you found the hover/tap supertitles. Did you discover them, or did you read the instructions in the hamburger button (top-left corner) first, may I ask?

I discovered those on my own, but after scanning through the hamburger button text, which I mostly ignored because it so happened that the words were very big and the text column very narrow on the display that I was using at first.

Yes, in order to keep the dial pips evenly spaced (and the code simpler), different months will spin at slightly different rates.

Every Sunday this month is bold-faced by coincidence. The actual pat tern isthe initial pip is bold (like the other dials), and then every seven day-pips is bold thereafter. Every seven days is bold because there are
seven days in a week, there're approximately seven days in a lunar quarter, and to correlate roughly with the 90-degree–based bolding on the months' dial. It looks best in February (set your system clock, or input a JS Date object to `dateclock.set()` in the browser console).

Well, if there was an option to depict my Symmetry454 date then boldfacing every Monday would make sense. Would 35-day months be a problem? On the month dial there probably isn't enough room to show the leap week at end of year as a 13th mini-month. http://www.sym454.org/symmetry/

Sunrise and sunset shading… That's a taller order. I'd need to store a data table or call outward to one, and I'd need to query the browser client or human user for a location. It's possible to do, but it's far more than I wish to do presently.

On a SmartPhone there usually should be an API to get the current locale coordinates, which are needed at dateclock launch and perhaps occasionally thereafter.

The hands' width are challenging in that there are five of them, and they must look legible on large and tiny screens. Transparency would increase CPU usage (more work for the browser to paint). I also considered pointier shapes for the hands, but that also pushed the CPU too hard. And I briefly considered putting the numbers above the hands, but that looked unnatural. Also, I don't even read the numbers after a while, I've become so familiar with the fractions. To me, it's more a quick feeling conveyed of "we're presently a quarter through the year, nearly an eighth through the month, just over five eighths through the day, etc.

I see.

I haven't yet understood what the lunar date clock is showing me. Perhaps that's because counting the month numbers since the south solstice is of no interest to me, but I expect that East Asians intuitively find it to be relevant. Perhaps an analog view of Hebrew dates, where Nisan is the first month?


Thanks very much for look and talking.

I like how you resisted using colours. The gray shading is novel, and classy. I like the Dark view.

-- Irv
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Irv Bromberg
I feel that there is no need to permanently display the 8 rectangular toggle option buttons, because once the user has decided which display style is preferred, there will only occasionally be further need to modify those settings. So I would like to hide them except when needed to change settings. When hidden, the window size should auto-adjust accordingly rather than leaving empty space where the hidden buttons used to be shown.

The motion of the second hand that I complained about yesterday is much less objectionable if one reduces the window size so that the diameter of the dial is around 5 cm. Of course the outer dials get a tad fuzzy when so small. Will they still look reasonably sharp on a 4K display?

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Irv Bromberg
In reply to this post by dateclock
From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] on behalf of dateclock [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 19:42

The "seconds" hand updates every 40 milliseconds. This speed was chosen by eyeball trial-and-error.


On my dual-core Pentium D PC running Win7 at 3 GHz with 4GB RAM and 200GB hard drive, I find that it is impossible to play YouTube videos in FireFox while a background window behind the YouTube window is running DateClock, presumably because DateClock is so intensively handling that second hand. Is there a way to prevent it from consuming any CPU time when it is in the background / not visible? Even if so, if the user keeps DateClock visible on a second screen then it will likely still be impossible to play YouTube videos.

Is DateClock running as a Java applet, or JavaScript?

--- Irv Bromberg
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Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.

Ryan Provost-2
In reply to this post by Irv Bromberg

The second hand: I would also like to have it as an option to toggle on/off or to have a secondary dial on the centre-top or centre-bottom of the main clock dial. Concerning configuration options, I do agree with Irv and have it to show once needed within the sidebar or topbar when clicked/tapped on the gear icon. Concerning lunar option, option for Hebrew, Chinese, Islamic, Yerm Lunar and/or McKenna-Meyer Goddess Lunar Calendar may be an option to add in the options. Also, Symmetry454/010 would also be an option, maybe with other calendar reform concepts, and maybe Hexadecimal time [16x256x16], Dozenal/Duodecimal time [(2x)12x144x144] and metric/decimal time [10x100x100] (and/or decimalized hours [24x100x100]) and/or New Earth Time (360x60), grad time (400x100) and UTC support. Maybe an app for Android/iOS/Win10 too.

 

-Ryan

RDK 3000-Tristar

@RDKTSR

https://www.facebook.com/RDKTSR

https://www.roblox.com/users/134216329/profile

https://my.secondlife.com/elite.runner

2018.04.04-We [RDK-TSR]

E/EY1018 EE ED094 ZL13 EW09 ZG3 EG4 CG1

Threezat-Fourde-Oner

66.69 EMD.M MLE 371.9.11 EMD.E ELE

1018/4/3 ESC 1018/3/22 EDC

1018/3/20 ELSC 1049/6/20 ELC

1018/4/18 ELSWC 1049/6/18 ELWC

1018/3/32 EWC 1018/3/18 EWDC

17k626rmSEDT 1t18n257mtmELT 4m389k578 ZD

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929/9/19 XLD 929/9/17 XLXD

8me4st95di SPT/21ya2mio15dn WCT

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Irv Bromberg <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, April 4, 2018 9:43:55 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Analog "Date Clock" free online.
 
I feel that there is no need to permanently display the 8 rectangular toggle option buttons, because once the user has decided which display style is preferred, there will only occasionally be further need to modify those settings. So I would like to hide them except when needed to change settings. When hidden, the window size should auto-adjust accordingly rather than leaving empty space where the hidden buttons used to be shown.

The motion of the second hand that I complained about yesterday is much less objectionable if one reduces the window size so that the diameter of the dial is around 5 cm. Of course the outer dials get a tad fuzzy when so small. Will they still look reasonably sharp on a 4K display?

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada