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Alternate name for leap week

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Alternate name for leap week

Irv Bromberg
Dear Calendarists:

I was discussing my Symmetry454 calendar with a sports enthusiast.

I explained that it has 4 equal quarters (like a North American football game) and every 6 or 5 years appends a leap week.

He interpreted this to mean that the 4 quarters are occasionally followed by an overtime period!


-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada


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Leap week in leap quarter RE: Alternate name for leap week

Karl Palmen

Dear Irv and Calendar People

 

One problem with that name (Overtime) is that it is not well known in Britain. The nearest equivalent (which is in soccer) is called extra time and the game has two halves.

 

However it did bring up the idea of having the leap week at the ends of quarters spread as evenly as possible.  In the 293-year cycle one gets a simple pattern of leap weeks occurring alternately every 23 and 22 quarters for 13 leap weeks (23+22+23+22+23+22+23+22+23+22+23+22+23 = 293 quarters) . I’ve mentioned this idea before.

 

The main benefit is the simpler pattern (I don’t expect Irv to appreciate this).

The other is the mean quarter starts are evenly spread at intervals of one quarter mean year.

 

The drawbacks arise from the intercalation occurring at times other than the end of the year and at variable times of the year.

 

Karl

 

10(10(24 till noon

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Irv Bromberg
Sent: 17 July 2009 04:26
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Alternate name for leap week

 

Dear Calendarists:

 

I was discussing my Symmetry454 calendar with a sports enthusiast.

 

I explained that it has 4 equal quarters (like a North American football game) and every 6 or 5 years appends a leap week.

 

He interpreted this to mean that the 4 quarters are occasionally followed by an overtime period!

 

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

 

 


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Re: Alternate name for leap week

zengyiping
In reply to this post by Irv Bromberg
Dear Irv,
I have a question. What is the first day of year in your Symmetry454 calendar. Is it the same as Gregorian when the new calendar begin in use? Thank you very much.
Yiping Zeng


Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2009 22:25:48 -0500
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Alternate name for leap week
To: [hidden email]

Dear Calendarists:

I was discussing my Symmetry454 calendar with a sports enthusiast.

I explained that it has 4 equal quarters (like a North American football game) and every 6 or 5 years appends a leap week.

He interpreted this to mean that the 4 quarters are occasionally followed by an overtime period!


-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada




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Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

Karl Palmen

Dear Yiping, Irv and Calendar People

 

I expect the information is hidden away somewhere in Irv’s web site. I can’t easily find it. However the more concise article of Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetry454 places that start of its year 1 on the proleptic Gregorian January 1, 1 AD, which was a Monday.

I expect Irv would have corrected this if it were not correct.

 

Karl

 

10(10(25

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of zengyiping
Sent: 17 July 2009 14:21
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Alternate name for leap week

 

Dear Irv,
I have a question. What is the first day of year in your Symmetry454 calendar. Is it the same as Gregorian when the new calendar begin in use? Thank you very much.
Yiping Zeng


Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2009 22:25:48 -0500
From: [hidden email]
Subject: Alternate name for leap week
To: [hidden email]

Dear Calendarists:

 

I was discussing my Symmetry454 calendar with a sports enthusiast.

 

I explained that it has 4 equal quarters (like a North American football game) and every 6 or 5 years appends a leap week.

 

He interpreted this to mean that the 4 quarters are occasionally followed by an overtime period!

 

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

 

 


MSN装进手机,更多聊天乐趣等你挖掘! 立刻下载!


--
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Re: Alternate name for leap week

Irv Bromberg
In reply to this post by zengyiping
On 2009 Jul 17, at 08:20 , zengyiping wrote:
What is the first day of year in your Symmetry454 calendar. Is it the same as Gregorian when the new calendar begin in use?
Yiping Zeng


Yiping, thank you for your interest...

Every Symmetry454 year starts on Monday.

Calendar proleptic epoch = Symmetry454 Monday, January 1, 1 AD which was exactly the same day as Gregorian Monday, January 1, 1 AD.

Officially, Symmetry454 has been running since Monday, January 1, 2005 AD, which was its first New Year Day after I posted the calendar specifications, and which was on Gregorian Monday, January 3, 2005 AD.

When the calendar is adopted for widespread use, it would be desirable to avoid any date gap or overlap.  There is no need to wait for a matching New Year Day, however, because it will be simple enough to switch at the start of the next month that matches.  For example, in 2010 AD the Symmetry454 New Year Day will fall on Gregorian January 4th, so that would not be a good day to switch, however both calendars will agree on the start of February and November in that year.  In 2011 AD the Sym454 NYD will fall on Gregorian Jan 3rd, but both calendars will agree on the start of August in that year.  In general there is at least one month per year whose starting date the two calendars agree upon.  Of course, when they agree on the starting date for a month, they also agree on every date within that month, until the end of the month on whichever calendar has the shorter month length.

You can use my freeware Kalendis program, available at <http://www.sym454.org/kalendis/> to see Symmetry454 dates alongside a variety of other calendars, such as Gregorian, ISO, and traditional oriental lunisolar calendars.  Please install the public version and then download and use the public beta version to obtain the most up-to-date version.  (I haven't yet had time to post a public full installer that installs the latest version directly, hopefully that will happen this coming August.)


-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada


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Re: Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

Irv Bromberg
In reply to this post by Karl Palmen
On 2009 Jul 17, at 08:31 , Palmen, KEV (Karl) wrote:
I expect the information is hidden away somewhere in Irv’s web site. I can’t easily find it.
However the more concise article of Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetry454 places that start of its year 1 on the proleptic Gregorian January 1, 1 AD, which was a Monday.
I expect Irv would have corrected this if it were not correct.


Irv replies:  There are several things that need to be updated or corrected there, but I dare not personally touch the page, because in the past every time that I've made any change it got undone or modified by somebody else, or somebody proposed to delete the page accusing me of "self promotion".  I didn't create the page in the first place, it was started by Shriramana Sharma of India. A variety of other people have edited it, and translated it into a few other languages.  There is also a slightly different version at our Wikia Calendars web site at <http://calendars.wikia.com/wiki/Symmetry454_Calendar>, which I note still has K=166 instead of K=146, but I stick to modifying only my own web site, as the official home page of the calendar.

I acknowledge that an explicit statement of the calendar epoch doesn't "hit you in the face" in my web page text, but nevertheless it is implicit in the specifications that every year starts on Monday and that it preserves the traditional 7-day weekly cycle.


-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada


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Re: Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

Irv Bromberg
On 2009 Jul 18, at 11:08 , ELITE 3000 wrote:
I would use the symmetry454 week pattern for the Gregorian Leap Week calendar.

Not understood -- what did you mean by the above comment?

-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada


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Re: Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

Karl Palmen
In reply to this post by Irv Bromberg

Dear Irv and Calendar People

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Irv Bromberg
Sent: 17 July 2009 18:30
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

 

 

I acknowledge that an explicit statement of the calendar epoch doesn't "hit you in the face" in my web page text, but nevertheless it is implicit in the specifications that every year starts on Monday and that it preserves the traditional 7-day weekly cycle.

 

Karl says: No it is not, the calendar could start a week later or earlier and still satisfy that condition.

However, such a calendar would not have a Gregorian year beginning on the same day for a very long time before and after, unlike the 5:40:400 rule.

 

Karl

 

10(10(27 till noon

 


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Re: Symmetry454 Epoch RE: Alternate name for leap week

Irv Bromberg
On 2009 Jul 20, at 03:21 , Palmen, KEV (Karl) wrote:
Irv Bromberg wrote:  I acknowledge that an explicit statement of the calendar epoch doesn't "hit you in the face" in my web page text, but nevertheless it is implicit in the specifications that every year starts on Monday and that it preserves the traditional 7-day weekly cycle.
 
Karl says: No it is not, the calendar could start a week later or earlier and still satisfy that condition.

Irv replies:  I went to add the epoch information to my web pages and documentation, then realized that although I recommend that years always start on Monday, Kalendis in Symmetry454 "Experiment" mode allows a wide choice of leap rules and quarter structures, and also allows New Year Day to fall on any weekday that the user desires, with Monday as the default.  If the "Start On:" setting is left at Monday as I recommend then the epoch is the same as Monday, January 1, 1 AD (Gregorian).  If any weekday is selected by the user, however, the epoch implicitly shifts accordingly.  Thus if Sym454 years are set to start on Friday then the epoch is 3 days before the Gregorian, and if Sym454 years are set to start on Thursday then the epoch is 3 days after the Gregorian epoch.

Therefore I have added the following to <http://www.sym454.org/symmetry/>, linked to from the "Contents" menu at the top of the page for quick access:


Epoch

Provided that years always start on Monday, the Symmetry454 calendar shares the same epoch as the Gregorian calendar, starting on Monday, January 1, 1 AD. This was also the same epoch as that of the Symmetry010 calendar, the ISO calendar, and the Revised Julian calendar.


-- Irv Bromberg, Toronto, Canada

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