A Rabbinic-style calendar

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A Rabbinic-style calendar

Mockingbird0
Calendar dates are represented as numbers.  For example, a date of 0 means
midnight March 6 UT in the Gregorian calendar;  a date of 1 means midnight
March 7 UT;  a date of -1 means midnight March 5 UT;  a date of 0.5 means
noon March 6 UT.

In this calendar's calculations the smallest time-unit is .000001 day (.0864
sec).

The calendar year's beginning is determined from the mean conjunction of
Nisan.  The mean conjunction of Nisan is the first mean conjunction in the
Gregorian calendar year to generate a lunar-year starting-time of 6PM on
March 7th or later.

The lunar year begins at sunset after the 6AM-to-6AM day on which the mean
conjunction of Nisan falls.  In calculations, sunset will be represented as
6PM.

The calendar uses a fixed synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days.  (Of
course, in the future, this can be changed as needed.)

The calendar has 12 lunar months in an ordinary (or common) year, and 13
lunar months in an embolismic year.

The months are:

Nisan 29 days
Iyar        30 days
Sivan 29 days
Tammuz 30 days
Av        29 days
Elul        30 days
Tishri 29 days
Marheshvan 30 days
Kislev 29 days
Teveth 30 days
Shvat 29 days or 30 days
Adar        30 days
Intercalary month 30 days or 29 days

Ordinary years have 354 or 355 days.  Embolismic years have 383 or 384 days.
In an ordinary year with 354 days, the month of Shvat has 29 days.  In an
ordinary year with 355 days, Shvat has 30 days.  In an embolismic year Shvat
has 29 days.  In an embolismic year with 383 days, the intercalary month has
29 days.  In an embolismic year with 384 days, the intercalary month has 30
days.

Besides the month and day-number designation, lunar days are alternatively
designated by the Gregorian calendar day in which their hours of daylight
fall.   A lunar day running from 6PM March 6 to 6PM March 7 is thus named
"March 7".

The starting date for the Paschal mean conjunctions in this calendar is is
April 4, 2000 at 4:32:45.63 UT.  This is represented as 29.189417 in the
year 2000.

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 2000, multiply
-10.632932 by the number of  years since 2000.  Add to 29.189417.  Subtract
the number of bissextile days since March 6, 2000.    This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by -29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
(If the quotient is negative, the nearest integer below is more negative
than the quotient).  This is the second sum.  Add 1 to the second sum.
Multiply by 29.530589 and add the result to the first sum.  (The value
-10.632932 is 365 minus 12x29.530589.)

Example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 2016?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x16) - 4 = -144.937495
Second sum = [-144.937495/-29.530589] = 4
Second sum + 1 = 5
First sum + (5x29.530589) = 2.715450

The paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is on 2.715450 or March 8, 2016 at
17:10:14.88.

Another example:  What is the Paschal mean conjunction for 2003?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x3) = -2.709379.
Second sum = [-2.709379/-29.530589] = 0
Second sum + 1 = 1
-2.709379 + 29.530589 = 26.82121 = April 1 at 19:42:32.54

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 1582 and before 2000,
multiply 10.632932 by the number of years before 2000, i.e. 1999 = 1, 1998 =
2, and so on.  Add to 29.189417.  Add the number of bissextile days between
March 6, 2000 and March 6 of the desired year.  This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by 29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
This is the second sum.  Multiply by 29.530589 and subtract the result from
the first sum.

Example:  What is the tentative paschal mean conjunction for 1999?

First sum = 29.189417 + 10.632932 + 1 = 40.822349
Second sum = [40.822349/29.530589] = 1
40.822349 - 29.530589 = 11.291760 = March 17 1999 7:00:08.0640

Another example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 1990?

First sum = 29.189417 + (10.632932x10) + 3 = 138.518737
Second sum = [138.518737/29.530589] = 4
138.518737 - (4x29.530589) = 20.396381 = March 26 9:30:47.3184

To get the start of the lunar year, examine the Paschal mean conjunction.
The first lunar month begins at 6PM after the 6AM-to-6AM day in which the
Paschal mean conjunction falls.

Example:  When does the first lunar month for 2016 begin?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is at 2.715450.  This falls within the
day starting at 6AM on March 8 (2.25) and ending at 6AM on March 9 (3.25).
The lunar month therefore begins at 6PM on March 9th, or 3.75, and is
designated March 10.

To determine whether a year is common or embolismic, examine the following
year's Paschal mean conjunction.   If the after-year's Paschal mean
conjunction is on a later date in its year than the former-year's date in
its year--that is, if the after year's Paschal mean conjunction has a higher
numerical value than the former-year's--then the year is embolismic and has
383 or 384 days.  If the after-year's Paschal mean conjunction is on an
earlier date in its year than the former year's is in its year, then the
year is common and has 354 or 355 days.

Example:  Is the lunar year 2016-2017 common or embolismic?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 (March 8 at 17:10:14.88)
That for 2017 is 21.613107 (March 27 at 14:42:52.4448).  Since March 27 is a
later date than March 8, the year is embolismic.

To determine the number of days in the year, examine the Paschal mean
conjunction.   If the fractional part is in the range 0 to .249999 inclusive
or in the range .882932 to .999999 inclusive and the year is common, then it
has 355 days.  If the fractional part of the Paschal mean conjunction is not
in one of these ranges, then a common year has 354 days.  If the fractional
part of the Paschal mean conjunction is between .25 and .352342 inclusive
and the year is embolismic, then the year has 383 days.  Otherwise an
embolismic year has 384 days.

Example:  how many days has lunar year 2016-2017?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 and the year is
embolismic.  The fractional part of this value is .715450.  This is not in
the range .25 to .352342 inclusive, so the year has 384 days.

Another example:  how many days has lunar year 2025-2026?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2025 is   23.141418 -- March 29 at
03:23:38.52.  The fractional part of this value is .141418.  This is in the
range 0 to .249999 inclusive.  The lunar year 2025-2026 therefore has 355
days.  

Here are some dates of 1 Nisan for the period 1995-2089 inclusive:


Further observations:  The intercalation sequence is not fixed.  In the 19
years 1995-2013 the intercalations are in years 3,5,8,11,14,16, and 19 and
this pattern is fairly common.  In the 19 years 2014-2032, however, the
intercalations are in years 3,6,8,11,14,16, and 19.

This calendar allows 1 Nisan on April 6th, unlike the Gregorian Easter cycle
which limits the dates of 1 Nisan to the dates March 8 through April 5.
Hence this calendar allows Easter on April 26th, unlike the Gregorian Easter
cycle which limits the dates of Easter to the dates March 22 through April
25.






--
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Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Amos Shapir-2
Hi Mockingbird and calendar people,

This system seems to be constructed according to the same principles suggested by Rav Ada (see details here), except that the solar calendar he knew was the Julian one, so his method was deemed too complicated and not accurate enough for the trouble.

It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas are computed.

On Sat, Mar 23, 2019 at 5:01 PM Mockingbird0 <[hidden email]> wrote:
Calendar dates are represented as numbers.  For example, a date of 0 means
midnight March 6 UT in the Gregorian calendar;  a date of 1 means midnight
March 7 UT;  a date of -1 means midnight March 5 UT;  a date of 0.5 means
noon March 6 UT.

In this calendar's calculations the smallest time-unit is .000001 day (.0864
sec).

The calendar year's beginning is determined from the mean conjunction of
Nisan.  The mean conjunction of Nisan is the first mean conjunction in the
Gregorian calendar year to generate a lunar-year starting-time of 6PM on
March 7th or later.

The lunar year begins at sunset after the 6AM-to-6AM day on which the mean
conjunction of Nisan falls.  In calculations, sunset will be represented as
6PM.

The calendar uses a fixed synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days.  (Of
course, in the future, this can be changed as needed.)

The calendar has 12 lunar months in an ordinary (or common) year, and 13
lunar months in an embolismic year.

The months are:

Nisan                   29 days
Iyar                            30 days
Sivan                   29 days
Tammuz                  30 days
Av                              29 days
Elul                            30 days
Tishri                  29 days
Marheshvan              30 days
Kislev                  29 days
Teveth                  30 days
Shvat                   29 days or 30 days
Adar                            30 days
Intercalary month       30 days or 29 days

Ordinary years have 354 or 355 days.  Embolismic years have 383 or 384 days.
In an ordinary year with 354 days, the month of Shvat has 29 days.  In an
ordinary year with 355 days, Shvat has 30 days.  In an embolismic year Shvat
has 29 days.  In an embolismic year with 383 days, the intercalary month has
29 days.  In an embolismic year with 384 days, the intercalary month has 30
days.

Besides the month and day-number designation, lunar days are alternatively
designated by the Gregorian calendar day in which their hours of daylight
fall.   A lunar day running from 6PM March 6 to 6PM March 7 is thus named
"March 7".

The starting date for the Paschal mean conjunctions in this calendar is is
April 4, 2000 at 4:32:45.63 UT.  This is represented as 29.189417 in the
year 2000.

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 2000, multiply
-10.632932 by the number of  years since 2000.  Add to 29.189417.  Subtract
the number of bissextile days since March 6, 2000.    This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by -29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
(If the quotient is negative, the nearest integer below is more negative
than the quotient).  This is the second sum.  Add 1 to the second sum.
Multiply by 29.530589 and add the result to the first sum.  (The value
-10.632932 is 365 minus 12x29.530589.)

Example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 2016?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x16) - 4 = -144.937495
Second sum = [-144.937495/-29.530589] = 4
Second sum + 1 = 5
First sum + (5x29.530589) = 2.715450

The paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is on 2.715450 or March 8, 2016 at
17:10:14.88.

Another example:  What is the Paschal mean conjunction for 2003?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x3) = -2.709379.
Second sum = [-2.709379/-29.530589] = 0
Second sum + 1 = 1
-2.709379 + 29.530589 = 26.82121 = April 1 at 19:42:32.54

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 1582 and before 2000,
multiply 10.632932 by the number of years before 2000, i.e. 1999 = 1, 1998 =
2, and so on.  Add to 29.189417.  Add the number of bissextile days between
March 6, 2000 and March 6 of the desired year.  This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by 29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
This is the second sum.  Multiply by 29.530589 and subtract the result from
the first sum.

Example:  What is the tentative paschal mean conjunction for 1999?

First sum = 29.189417 + 10.632932 + 1 = 40.822349
Second sum = [40.822349/29.530589] = 1
40.822349 - 29.530589 = 11.291760 = March 17 1999 7:00:08.0640

Another example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 1990?

First sum = 29.189417 + (10.632932x10) + 3 = 138.518737
Second sum = [138.518737/29.530589] = 4
138.518737 - (4x29.530589) = 20.396381 = March 26 9:30:47.3184

To get the start of the lunar year, examine the Paschal mean conjunction.
The first lunar month begins at 6PM after the 6AM-to-6AM day in which the
Paschal mean conjunction falls.

Example:  When does the first lunar month for 2016 begin?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is at 2.715450.  This falls within the
day starting at 6AM on March 8 (2.25) and ending at 6AM on March 9 (3.25).
The lunar month therefore begins at 6PM on March 9th, or 3.75, and is
designated March 10.

To determine whether a year is common or embolismic, examine the following
year's Paschal mean conjunction.   If the after-year's Paschal mean
conjunction is on a later date in its year than the former-year's date in
its year--that is, if the after year's Paschal mean conjunction has a higher
numerical value than the former-year's--then the year is embolismic and has
383 or 384 days.  If the after-year's Paschal mean conjunction is on an
earlier date in its year than the former year's is in its year, then the
year is common and has 354 or 355 days.

Example:  Is the lunar year 2016-2017 common or embolismic?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 (March 8 at 17:10:14.88)
That for 2017 is 21.613107 (March 27 at 14:42:52.4448).  Since March 27 is a
later date than March 8, the year is embolismic.

To determine the number of days in the year, examine the Paschal mean
conjunction.   If the fractional part is in the range 0 to .249999 inclusive
or in the range .882932 to .999999 inclusive and the year is common, then it
has 355 days.  If the fractional part of the Paschal mean conjunction is not
in one of these ranges, then a common year has 354 days.  If the fractional
part of the Paschal mean conjunction is between .25 and .352342 inclusive
and the year is embolismic, then the year has 383 days.  Otherwise an
embolismic year has 384 days.

Example:  how many days has lunar year 2016-2017?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 and the year is
embolismic.  The fractional part of this value is .715450.  This is not in
the range .25 to .352342 inclusive, so the year has 384 days.

Another example:  how many days has lunar year 2025-2026?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2025 is   23.141418 -- March 29 at
03:23:38.52.  The fractional part of this value is .141418.  This is in the
range 0 to .249999 inclusive.  The lunar year 2025-2026 therefore has 355
days. 

Here are some dates of 1 Nisan for the period 1995-2089 inclusive:


Further observations:  The intercalation sequence is not fixed.  In the 19
years 1995-2013 the intercalations are in years 3,5,8,11,14,16, and 19 and
this pattern is fairly common.  In the 19 years 2014-2032, however, the
intercalations are in years 3,6,8,11,14,16, and 19.

This calendar allows 1 Nisan on April 6th, unlike the Gregorian Easter cycle
which limits the dates of 1 Nisan to the dates March 8 through April 5.
Hence this calendar allows Easter on April 26th, unlike the Gregorian Easter
cycle which limits the dates of Easter to the dates March 22 through April
25.






--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/


--
Amos Shapir
 
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Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Calendar People

The calendar seems to be like the Hebrew calendar, except
(1) There are no postponement rules.
(2) The month lengths are nearly all different. Months of 29 and 30 days are usually interchanged.
(3) The molad interval is exactly 29.530589 days.
(4) Instead of the 19-year cycle rule for embolismic years, the new year month is reckoned by the position of its Molad relative to Gregorian March 7.

Karl

Monday Delta March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 24/03/2019 - 09:48 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hi Mockingbird and calendar people,

This system seems to be constructed according to the same principles suggested by Rav Ada (see details here), except that the solar calendar he knew was the Julian one, so his method was deemed too complicated and not accurate enough for the trouble.

It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas are computed.

On Sat, Mar 23, 2019 at 5:01 PM Mockingbird0 <[hidden email]> wrote:
Calendar dates are represented as numbers.  For example, a date of 0 means
midnight March 6 UT in the Gregorian calendar;  a date of 1 means midnight
March 7 UT;  a date of -1 means midnight March 5 UT;  a date of 0.5 means
noon March 6 UT.

In this calendar's calculations the smallest time-unit is .000001 day (.0864
sec).

The calendar year's beginning is determined from the mean conjunction of
Nisan.  The mean conjunction of Nisan is the first mean conjunction in the
Gregorian calendar year to generate a lunar-year starting-time of 6PM on
March 7th or later.

The lunar year begins at sunset after the 6AM-to-6AM day on which the mean
conjunction of Nisan falls.  In calculations, sunset will be represented as
6PM.

The calendar uses a fixed synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days.  (Of
course, in the future, this can be changed as needed.)

The calendar has 12 lunar months in an ordinary (or common) year, and 13
lunar months in an embolismic year.

The months are:

Nisan                   29 days
Iyar                            30 days
Sivan                   29 days
Tammuz                  30 days
Av                              29 days
Elul                            30 days
Tishri                  29 days
Marheshvan              30 days
Kislev                  29 days
Teveth                  30 days
Shvat                   29 days or 30 days
Adar                            30 days
Intercalary month       30 days or 29 days

Ordinary years have 354 or 355 days.  Embolismic years have 383 or 384 days.
In an ordinary year with 354 days, the month of Shvat has 29 days.  In an
ordinary year with 355 days, Shvat has 30 days.  In an embolismic year Shvat
has 29 days.  In an embolismic year with 383 days, the intercalary month has
29 days.  In an embolismic year with 384 days, the intercalary month has 30
days.

Besides the month and day-number designation, lunar days are alternatively
designated by the Gregorian calendar day in which their hours of daylight
fall.   A lunar day running from 6PM March 6 to 6PM March 7 is thus named
"March 7".

The starting date for the Paschal mean conjunctions in this calendar is is
April 4, 2000 at 4:32:45.63 UT.  This is represented as 29.189417 in the
year 2000.

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 2000, multiply
-10.632932 by the number of  years since 2000.  Add to 29.189417.  Subtract
the number of bissextile days since March 6, 2000.    This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by -29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
(If the quotient is negative, the nearest integer below is more negative
than the quotient).  This is the second sum.  Add 1 to the second sum.
Multiply by 29.530589 and add the result to the first sum.  (The value
-10.632932 is 365 minus 12x29.530589.)

Example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 2016?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x16) - 4 = -144.937495
Second sum = [-144.937495/-29.530589] = 4
Second sum + 1 = 5
First sum + (5x29.530589) = 2.715450

The paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is on 2.715450 or March 8, 2016 at
17:10:14.88.

Another example:  What is the Paschal mean conjunction for 2003?

First sum = 29.189417 + (-10.632932x3) = -2.709379.
Second sum = [-2.709379/-29.530589] = 0
Second sum + 1 = 1
-2.709379 + 29.530589 = 26.82121 = April 1 at 19:42:32.54

To get the Paschal mean conjunction for any year after 1582 and before 2000,
multiply 10.632932 by the number of years before 2000, i.e. 1999 = 1, 1998 =
2, and so on.  Add to 29.189417.  Add the number of bissextile days between
March 6, 2000 and March 6 of the desired year.  This is the first sum.
Divide the first sum by 29.530589 and round to the nearest integer below.
This is the second sum.  Multiply by 29.530589 and subtract the result from
the first sum.

Example:  What is the tentative paschal mean conjunction for 1999?

First sum = 29.189417 + 10.632932 + 1 = 40.822349
Second sum = [40.822349/29.530589] = 1
40.822349 - 29.530589 = 11.291760 = March 17 1999 7:00:08.0640

Another example:  What is the paschal mean conjunction for 1990?

First sum = 29.189417 + (10.632932x10) + 3 = 138.518737
Second sum = [138.518737/29.530589] = 4
138.518737 - (4x29.530589) = 20.396381 = March 26 9:30:47.3184

To get the start of the lunar year, examine the Paschal mean conjunction.
The first lunar month begins at 6PM after the 6AM-to-6AM day in which the
Paschal mean conjunction falls.

Example:  When does the first lunar month for 2016 begin?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is at 2.715450.  This falls within the
day starting at 6AM on March 8 (2.25) and ending at 6AM on March 9 (3.25).
The lunar month therefore begins at 6PM on March 9th, or 3.75, and is
designated March 10.

To determine whether a year is common or embolismic, examine the following
year's Paschal mean conjunction.   If the after-year's Paschal mean
conjunction is on a later date in its year than the former-year's date in
its year--that is, if the after year's Paschal mean conjunction has a higher
numerical value than the former-year's--then the year is embolismic and has
383 or 384 days.  If the after-year's Paschal mean conjunction is on an
earlier date in its year than the former year's is in its year, then the
year is common and has 354 or 355 days.

Example:  Is the lunar year 2016-2017 common or embolismic?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 (March 8 at 17:10:14.88)
That for 2017 is 21.613107 (March 27 at 14:42:52.4448).  Since March 27 is a
later date than March 8, the year is embolismic.

To determine the number of days in the year, examine the Paschal mean
conjunction.   If the fractional part is in the range 0 to .249999 inclusive
or in the range .882932 to .999999 inclusive and the year is common, then it
has 355 days.  If the fractional part of the Paschal mean conjunction is not
in one of these ranges, then a common year has 354 days.  If the fractional
part of the Paschal mean conjunction is between .25 and .352342 inclusive
and the year is embolismic, then the year has 383 days.  Otherwise an
embolismic year has 384 days.

Example:  how many days has lunar year 2016-2017?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2016 is 2.715450 and the year is
embolismic.  The fractional part of this value is .715450.  This is not in
the range .25 to .352342 inclusive, so the year has 384 days.

Another example:  how many days has lunar year 2025-2026?

The Paschal mean conjunction for 2025 is   23.141418 -- March 29 at
03:23:38.52.  The fractional part of this value is .141418.  This is in the
range 0 to .249999 inclusive.  The lunar year 2025-2026 therefore has 355
days. 

Here are some dates of 1 Nisan for the period 1995-2089 inclusive:


Further observations:  The intercalation sequence is not fixed.  In the 19
years 1995-2013 the intercalations are in years 3,5,8,11,14,16, and 19 and
this pattern is fairly common.  In the 19 years 2014-2032, however, the
intercalations are in years 3,6,8,11,14,16, and 19.

This calendar allows 1 Nisan on April 6th, unlike the Gregorian Easter cycle
which limits the dates of 1 Nisan to the dates March 8 through April 5.
Hence this calendar allows Easter on April 26th, unlike the Gregorian Easter
cycle which limits the dates of Easter to the dates March 22 through April
25.






--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/


--
Amos Shapir
 


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Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Mockingbird0
In reply to this post by Amos Shapir-2
Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



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Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Amos, Mockingbird cc, sirs:
>A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
>from the final post.
I have demonstrated and shown my calculations for 2*(448-years/5541 Moons) ***

My 448-yr/5541 moons Astro-Cycle:

448-years=(334+19*6);(11*19+30+11*19)

448*365.2421875=163628.5days+0.49287326=163628.99287326/5541=29.53058886 days ie Mean Moon=29d 12h 44m 2s.877504. [2.877470166923227 second]

******. 

along with 19-year cycle reaching the TRUE value of Astronomers’ Mean Lunar Moon= 29.53058886 days [29.5 Tithi] on slight increment of last “half Tithi” as:

image1.jpeg

This is a slight improvement over the Hebrew Molad calendar calculations. 
My constant reporting of these values, to me seem, sufficient ‘authenticity’ demanded of originality & authorship.
I, however, link my calculations to Indus Tithi Lunar Calendars (displayed below) as also discussed with Calendar-L:
image2.jpeg
My calculations for 19-year calulatiins with Tithi=1+335/326919 day demonstrated are an EXACT FITin the cycle. 
Regards,
Ex-Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), IAF
Monday, 2019 March 25H20:51 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 25, 2019, at 19:01, Mockingbird0 <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
are computed.
Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/
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Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
In reply to this post by Mockingbird0
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Other Calendar People

This lunisolar calendar makes use of an existing solar calendar (the Gregorian calendar) to determine which years have a leap month. I regard such calendars as modern to distinguish them from ancient lunisolar calendar, which determined the leap months by the 19-year cycle or some variant thereof.

The business of calculating the molad of Nisan is quite complicated. Some time ago, I found a way of modifying such a calendar to simplify this (at the expense of adding a little lunar jitter). In this, the molad interval for any leap month is increased to exactly 30 days. The molad intervals of all the other months remain equal but are reduced a little to compensate for the increased interval for the leap months. The fractional part of the molad then increments by the same amount every year, rather than a different amount for leap month years.

For non-leap months, I reckoned a molad interval of 29 + 319/618 days would be quite accurate. Over a 12-month year, this becomes 354 + 20/103 days and over a 13-month year, this becomes 384 + 20/103 days (same fractional part makes calculations easier).
The following non-leap month molad interval of 29.516181 days would be accurate. Over a year, it would become 354.194172 or 384.194172 days.

For any of the lunar calendar cycles listed in my spreadsheets,
http://the-light.com/cal/kp_Lunisolar_xls.html
the fractional part of these molad intervals added up over a year is simply the value in the 3rd column "Abundant" divided by the number of years (1st column).
To get the fractional part of the non-leap month molad interval, divide by 12 and add a half.

The resulting calendar is similar to Robert Pontisso's Simple lunar calendar,
http://web.archive.org/web/20060501202828/www.geocities.com/rpontisso/lunisolar/lunisolarinstructions.html
but the abundant years (years in which Zeta has 30 days) are spread as smoothly as possible.

A formula for the molad interval for the non-leap months in terms of the desired mean month and the mean year of the solar calendar can be worked out from the formulae given in the description of my lunisolar spreadsheets.

Karl

Tuesday Delta March 2019


----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 26/03/2019 - 02:01 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/
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Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Ryan Provost-2

On the topic of lunisolar calendars, I would like to give some insight of the one idea that I thought it would play out

 

The new year occurs on midnight the first new moon of the vernal equinox ie for 2019, according to Kalendis, new moon occurs on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr 08:50 UTC and the vernal equinox occurred at 21:58 UTC last Wednesday 2019.03.20-We. New months are determined as follows: If the new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then it’s the new month, however if it falls at 12:00 UTC or later then the following day will be the new month. In the event to determine the new year, if the vernal equinox and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then the day is the new year [PROCEDURE A], and if the new moon and vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC then that day is New Year’s Eve and the following day is the new year [PROCEDURE B]. But what if the new moon occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and vernal equinox occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s the same result as Procedure C. However what if the vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s NOT the new year and instead it’s the leap month and the next new moon (as late as April 18-20th) is the new year.

 

Given today’s date, 2019.03.27-We (as of UTC at time of email being sent, 01:00 UTC) it is 20th day of 12th month and the new year will occur on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr. Year numberings would go either the Holocene (Human) era (ie LS 12018/12/20 HE) or the common era (ie LS 2018/12/20 CE) or the number of years since the launch of the Julian day count offset and Julian Period/Era (JE) to the vernal equinox of 4713 BC (ie LS 6731/12/20 JE) in which it is 10 days away. Month names would be named by the Greek Alphabet (ie the current (12th) month is Mu, carried over from Simple Lunisolar calendar) This in conjunction of the Zodiac solar calendar (where the months are named by the zodiac and the new year being the day before 12:00 UTC or the following day after on or after 12:00 UTC and new months using same method as determining the new year every 30° elliptical longitude (Today on that calendar is Aries (first month) 6, 2019) would be used to determine which new moon falls on the zodiac and to determine the lunisolar new year. Both calendar systems are astronomical calendars (just like the Chinese and Persian calendars) and dates can be given via computer, mobile device or tablet and calendars can be generated and printed out. Of course due to time zones where dates may differ, UTC shall have to be used for determining such dates rather than local time.

 

PS: had to resend

 

Ryan Provost

RDK 3000-Tristar

Tilbury, ON, Canada

21:00:00.000 RDK - 04.166 666 EMT - 01.00:00[00] TRX

2019.03.26-Tu - TUESDAY, MARCH 26TH, 2019

MU 20 2018 LS/ARIES 6 2019 ZODIAC

E/EY 1019 EE ED085 ZL12 EW08 ZG2 EG5 CG7

70.25 EMD.M MLE/372.2.67 EMD.E ELE

Nu-Iota/Twozat-Fivede-Sevener

Gamma 25 1019 ESC - Gamma 13 1019 EDC - Gamma 17 1019 EWC - Gamma 03 1019 EWDC

Gamma 21 1019 ELSC - Zeta 21 1050 ELC - Gamma 17 1019 ELXC - Zeta 17 1050 ELWC

Eta 27 930 XD - Iota 20 930 XLD - Eta 17 930 XXD - Iota 16 930 XLXD

17982.041 666rm SEDT - 4m 389k 934 ZD - 1t 019n 232m 541k 850tm049 ELT

04ke 00si 00mt 00si ECX  - 01h 00kl 00ry 00tn EXT - 00xh 41xm 66xz 66xf XT

08me 8st 51dk D 04Ct 16sk 66nk 66ti SPT - 22ya 1mio 11di D 01Wt 66pt 66sd 66tc WCT

06:00:00.000 RKT/30:00:00.000 KKT Swampert 27, K.P 0014 - 01:00:00 UTC

25.000 000 KMT - 09:00:00:000 SOL - 00n 019m 789k 200s  APs

20:00:00 CDT - 19:00:00 MDT - 18:00:00 PDT - 02:00:00 CET

06:00:00 UNO/KAL - 05:00:00 ALP/HOV - 04:00:00 KT/JO/SN - 02:00:00 NOR

01:00:00 FRS - 07:00:00 STT - 05:00:00 MKDT - 07:15:00 YOT

Swampert 27, M.P 0019 - Swampert 27, A.P 0178 - Venusaur 27, KA.P 0023

Meganium 27, JO.P 0020 - Sceptile 27, HO.P 0017 - Torterra 27, SI.P 0013

Serperior 27, U.P 0009 - Chesnaught 27, KL.P 0006 - Decidueye 27, AL.P 0013

March 27, BE 2562 - March 27, ST.P 0004

022 454 041 666 S TSD [VYASEKANT 2245 FOURSDAY] - FRC ER 0227-07-06 00hd 48md 15sd TMP

19086.04166666 TLE EPH - 072.859D041.666 DTP - EXCEL PC: 43551.04166

EXCEL MAC: 42089.04166 - DAY 085 54:166.XTM, 2019 CE - JD 2458569.54166

]MJD 58569.04166 - STO STD 96838.47032 - D7 7.9166 Septem/Pearl 2019 TT - 54,166 GST

54.16 WRLD - 54.166 UMT - 015*00' NET - 51628.21530 MSD - @083 SIT

01n 553m 648k 400s UNIX - 0_AA_AA HEX - A:  0:60: 00/B:  01:00:00 DOZ

21-17(15(22 YLC/[01]112/12/22 MMG

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7:25:40 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Other Calendar People

This lunisolar calendar makes use of an existing solar calendar (the Gregorian calendar) to determine which years have a leap month. I regard such calendars as modern to distinguish them from ancient lunisolar calendar, which determined the leap months by the 19-year cycle or some variant thereof.

The business of calculating the molad of Nisan is quite complicated. Some time ago, I found a way of modifying such a calendar to simplify this (at the expense of adding a little lunar jitter). In this, the molad interval for any leap month is increased to exactly 30 days. The molad intervals of all the other months remain equal but are reduced a little to compensate for the increased interval for the leap months. The fractional part of the molad then increments by the same amount every year, rather than a different amount for leap month years.

For non-leap months, I reckoned a molad interval of 29 + 319/618 days would be quite accurate. Over a 12-month year, this becomes 354 + 20/103 days and over a 13-month year, this becomes 384 + 20/103 days (same fractional part makes calculations easier).
The following non-leap month molad interval of 29.516181 days would be accurate. Over a year, it would become 354.194172 or 384.194172 days.

For any of the lunar calendar cycles listed in my spreadsheets,
http://the-light.com/cal/kp_Lunisolar_xls.html
the fractional part of these molad intervals added up over a year is simply the value in the 3rd column "Abundant" divided by the number of years (1st column).
To get the fractional part of the non-leap month molad interval, divide by 12 and add a half.

The resulting calendar is similar to Robert Pontisso's Simple lunar calendar,
http://web.archive.org/web/20060501202828/www.geocities.com/rpontisso/lunisolar/lunisolarinstructions.html
but the abundant years (years in which Zeta has 30 days) are spread as smoothly as possible.

A formula for the molad interval for the non-leap months in terms of the desired mean month and the mean year of the solar calendar can be worked out from the formulae given in the description of my lunisolar spreadsheets.

Karl

Tuesday Delta March 2019


----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 26/03/2019 - 02:01 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/
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Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Ryan and Calendar People 

Ryan seems to have sent the same E-mail THREE TIMES. I'll keep only one of these. If they are different, please explain what the differences are.

Karl

Wednesday Delta March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 27/03/2019 - 01:00 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

On the topic of lunisolar calendars, I would like to give some insight of the one idea that I thought it would play out

 

The new year occurs on midnight the first new moon of the vernal equinox ie for 2019, according to Kalendis, new moon occurs on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr 08:50 UTC and the vernal equinox occurred at 21:58 UTC last Wednesday 2019.03.20-We. New months are determined as follows: If the new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then it’s the new month, however if it falls at 12:00 UTC or later then the following day will be the new month. In the event to determine the new year, if the vernal equinox and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then the day is the new year [PROCEDURE A], and if the new moon and vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC then that day is New Year’s Eve and the following day is the new year [PROCEDURE B]. But what if the new moon occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and vernal equinox occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s the same result as Procedure C. However what if the vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s NOT the new year and instead it’s the leap month and the next new moon (as late as April 18-20th) is the new year.

 

Given today’s date, 2019.03.27-We (as of UTC at time of email being sent, 01:00 UTC) it is 20th day of 12th month and the new year will occur on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr. Year numberings would go either the Holocene (Human) era (ie LS 12018/12/20 HE) or the common era (ie LS 2018/12/20 CE) or the number of years since the launch of the Julian day count offset and Julian Period/Era (JE) to the vernal equinox of 4713 BC (ie LS 6731/12/20 JE) in which it is 10 days away. Month names would be named by the Greek Alphabet (ie the current (12th) month is Mu, carried over from Simple Lunisolar calendar) This in conjunction of the Zodiac solar calendar (where the months are named by the zodiac and the new year being the day before 12:00 UTC or the following day after on or after 12:00 UTC and new months using same method as determining the new year every 30° elliptical longitude (Today on that calendar is Aries (first month) 6, 2019) would be used to determine which new moon falls on the zodiac and to determine the lunisolar new year. Both calendar systems are astronomical calendars (just like the Chinese and Persian calendars) and dates can be given via computer, mobile device or tablet and calendars can be generated and printed out. Of course due to time zones where dates may differ, UTC shall have to be used for determining such dates rather than local time.

 

PS: had to resend

 

Ryan Provost

RDK 3000-Tristar

Tilbury, ON, Canada

21:00:00.000 RDK - 04.166 666 EMT - 01.00:00[00] TRX

2019.03.26-Tu - TUESDAY, MARCH 26TH, 2019

MU 20 2018 LS/ARIES 6 2019 ZODIAC

E/EY 1019 EE ED085 ZL12 EW08 ZG2 EG5 CG7

70.25 EMD.M MLE/372.2.67 EMD.E ELE

Nu-Iota/Twozat-Fivede-Sevener

Gamma 25 1019 ESC - Gamma 13 1019 EDC - Gamma 17 1019 EWC - Gamma 03 1019 EWDC

Gamma 21 1019 ELSC - Zeta 21 1050 ELC - Gamma 17 1019 ELXC - Zeta 17 1050 ELWC

Eta 27 930 XD - Iota 20 930 XLD - Eta 17 930 XXD - Iota 16 930 XLXD

17982.041 666rm SEDT - 4m 389k 934 ZD - 1t 019n 232m 541k 850tm049 ELT

04ke 00si 00mt 00si ECX  - 01h 00kl 00ry 00tn EXT - 00xh 41xm 66xz 66xf XT

08me 8st 51dk D 04Ct 16sk 66nk 66ti SPT - 22ya 1mio 11di D 01Wt 66pt 66sd 66tc WCT

06:00:00.000 RKT/30:00:00.000 KKT Swampert 27, K.P 0014 - 01:00:00 UTC

25.000 000 KMT - 09:00:00:000 SOL - 00n 019m 789k 200s  APs

20:00:00 CDT - 19:00:00 MDT - 18:00:00 PDT - 02:00:00 CET

06:00:00 UNO/KAL - 05:00:00 ALP/HOV - 04:00:00 KT/JO/SN - 02:00:00 NOR

01:00:00 FRS - 07:00:00 STT - 05:00:00 MKDT - 07:15:00 YOT

Swampert 27, M.P 0019 - Swampert 27, A.P 0178 - Venusaur 27, KA.P 0023

Meganium 27, JO.P 0020 - Sceptile 27, HO.P 0017 - Torterra 27, SI.P 0013

Serperior 27, U.P 0009 - Chesnaught 27, KL.P 0006 - Decidueye 27, AL.P 0013

March 27, BE 2562 - March 27, ST.P 0004

022 454 041 666 S TSD [VYASEKANT 2245 FOURSDAY] - FRC ER 0227-07-06 00hd 48md 15sd TMP

19086.04166666 TLE EPH - 072.859D041.666 DTP - EXCEL PC: 43551.04166

EXCEL MAC: 42089.04166 - DAY 085 54:166.XTM, 2019 CE - JD 2458569.54166

]MJD 58569.04166 - STO STD 96838.47032 - D7 7.9166 Septem/Pearl 2019 TT - 54,166 GST

54.16 WRLD - 54.166 UMT - 015*00' NET - 51628.21530 MSD - @083 SIT

01n 553m 648k 400s UNIX - 0_AA_AA HEX - A:  0:60: 00/B:  01:00:00 DOZ

21-17(15(22 YLC/[01]112/12/22 MMG

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7:25:40 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Other Calendar People

This lunisolar calendar makes use of an existing solar calendar (the Gregorian calendar) to determine which years have a leap month. I regard such calendars as modern to distinguish them from ancient lunisolar calendar, which determined the leap months by the 19-year cycle or some variant thereof.

The business of calculating the molad of Nisan is quite complicated. Some time ago, I found a way of modifying such a calendar to simplify this (at the expense of adding a little lunar jitter). In this, the molad interval for any leap month is increased to exactly 30 days. The molad intervals of all the other months remain equal but are reduced a little to compensate for the increased interval for the leap months. The fractional part of the molad then increments by the same amount every year, rather than a different amount for leap month years.

For non-leap months, I reckoned a molad interval of 29 + 319/618 days would be quite accurate. Over a 12-month year, this becomes 354 + 20/103 days and over a 13-month year, this becomes 384 + 20/103 days (same fractional part makes calculations easier).
The following non-leap month molad interval of 29.516181 days would be accurate. Over a year, it would become 354.194172 or 384.194172 days.

For any of the lunar calendar cycles listed in my spreadsheets,
http://the-light.com/cal/kp_Lunisolar_xls.html
the fractional part of these molad intervals added up over a year is simply the value in the 3rd column "Abundant" divided by the number of years (1st column).
To get the fractional part of the non-leap month molad interval, divide by 12 and add a half.

The resulting calendar is similar to Robert Pontisso's Simple lunar calendar,
http://web.archive.org/web/20060501202828/www.geocities.com/rpontisso/lunisolar/lunisolarinstructions.html
but the abundant years (years in which Zeta has 30 days) are spread as smoothly as possible.

A formula for the molad interval for the non-leap months in terms of the desired mean month and the mean year of the solar calendar can be worked out from the formulae given in the description of my lunisolar spreadsheets.

Karl

Tuesday Delta March 2019


----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 26/03/2019 - 02:01 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/


Reply | Threaded
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|

Re: Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Ryan Provost-2

Karl: The other two are duplicate emails and would advise you to disregard the duplicate emails

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2019 1:11:22 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Ryan and Calendar People 

Ryan seems to have sent the same E-mail THREE TIMES. I'll keep only one of these. If they are different, please explain what the differences are.

Karl

Wednesday Delta March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 27/03/2019 - 01:00 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

On the topic of lunisolar calendars, I would like to give some insight of the one idea that I thought it would play out

 

The new year occurs on midnight the first new moon of the vernal equinox ie for 2019, according to Kalendis, new moon occurs on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr 08:50 UTC and the vernal equinox occurred at 21:58 UTC last Wednesday 2019.03.20-We. New months are determined as follows: If the new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then it’s the new month, however if it falls at 12:00 UTC or later then the following day will be the new month. In the event to determine the new year, if the vernal equinox and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then the day is the new year [PROCEDURE A], and if the new moon and vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC then that day is New Year’s Eve and the following day is the new year [PROCEDURE B]. But what if the new moon occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and vernal equinox occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s the same result as Procedure C. However what if the vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s NOT the new year and instead it’s the leap month and the next new moon (as late as April 18-20th) is the new year.

 

Given today’s date, 2019.03.27-We (as of UTC at time of email being sent, 01:00 UTC) it is 20th day of 12th month and the new year will occur on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr. Year numberings would go either the Holocene (Human) era (ie LS 12018/12/20 HE) or the common era (ie LS 2018/12/20 CE) or the number of years since the launch of the Julian day count offset and Julian Period/Era (JE) to the vernal equinox of 4713 BC (ie LS 6731/12/20 JE) in which it is 10 days away. Month names would be named by the Greek Alphabet (ie the current (12th) month is Mu, carried over from Simple Lunisolar calendar) This in conjunction of the Zodiac solar calendar (where the months are named by the zodiac and the new year being the day before 12:00 UTC or the following day after on or after 12:00 UTC and new months using same method as determining the new year every 30° elliptical longitude (Today on that calendar is Aries (first month) 6, 2019) would be used to determine which new moon falls on the zodiac and to determine the lunisolar new year. Both calendar systems are astronomical calendars (just like the Chinese and Persian calendars) and dates can be given via computer, mobile device or tablet and calendars can be generated and printed out. Of course due to time zones where dates may differ, UTC shall have to be used for determining such dates rather than local time.

 

PS: had to resend

 

Ryan Provost

RDK 3000-Tristar

Tilbury, ON, Canada

21:00:00.000 RDK - 04.166 666 EMT - 01.00:00[00] TRX

2019.03.26-Tu - TUESDAY, MARCH 26TH, 2019

MU 20 2018 LS/ARIES 6 2019 ZODIAC

E/EY 1019 EE ED085 ZL12 EW08 ZG2 EG5 CG7

70.25 EMD.M MLE/372.2.67 EMD.E ELE

Nu-Iota/Twozat-Fivede-Sevener

Gamma 25 1019 ESC - Gamma 13 1019 EDC - Gamma 17 1019 EWC - Gamma 03 1019 EWDC

Gamma 21 1019 ELSC - Zeta 21 1050 ELC - Gamma 17 1019 ELXC - Zeta 17 1050 ELWC

Eta 27 930 XD - Iota 20 930 XLD - Eta 17 930 XXD - Iota 16 930 XLXD

17982.041 666rm SEDT - 4m 389k 934 ZD - 1t 019n 232m 541k 850tm049 ELT

04ke 00si 00mt 00si ECX  - 01h 00kl 00ry 00tn EXT - 00xh 41xm 66xz 66xf XT

08me 8st 51dk D 04Ct 16sk 66nk 66ti SPT - 22ya 1mio 11di D 01Wt 66pt 66sd 66tc WCT

06:00:00.000 RKT/30:00:00.000 KKT Swampert 27, K.P 0014 - 01:00:00 UTC

25.000 000 KMT - 09:00:00:000 SOL - 00n 019m 789k 200s  APs

20:00:00 CDT - 19:00:00 MDT - 18:00:00 PDT - 02:00:00 CET

06:00:00 UNO/KAL - 05:00:00 ALP/HOV - 04:00:00 KT/JO/SN - 02:00:00 NOR

01:00:00 FRS - 07:00:00 STT - 05:00:00 MKDT - 07:15:00 YOT

Swampert 27, M.P 0019 - Swampert 27, A.P 0178 - Venusaur 27, KA.P 0023

Meganium 27, JO.P 0020 - Sceptile 27, HO.P 0017 - Torterra 27, SI.P 0013

Serperior 27, U.P 0009 - Chesnaught 27, KL.P 0006 - Decidueye 27, AL.P 0013

March 27, BE 2562 - March 27, ST.P 0004

022 454 041 666 S TSD [VYASEKANT 2245 FOURSDAY] - FRC ER 0227-07-06 00hd 48md 15sd TMP

19086.04166666 TLE EPH - 072.859D041.666 DTP - EXCEL PC: 43551.04166

EXCEL MAC: 42089.04166 - DAY 085 54:166.XTM, 2019 CE - JD 2458569.54166

]MJD 58569.04166 - STO STD 96838.47032 - D7 7.9166 Septem/Pearl 2019 TT - 54,166 GST

54.16 WRLD - 54.166 UMT - 015*00' NET - 51628.21530 MSD - @083 SIT

01n 553m 648k 400s UNIX - 0_AA_AA HEX - A:  0:60: 00/B:  01:00:00 DOZ

21-17(15(22 YLC/[01]112/12/22 MMG

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7:25:40 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Other Calendar People

This lunisolar calendar makes use of an existing solar calendar (the Gregorian calendar) to determine which years have a leap month. I regard such calendars as modern to distinguish them from ancient lunisolar calendar, which determined the leap months by the 19-year cycle or some variant thereof.

The business of calculating the molad of Nisan is quite complicated. Some time ago, I found a way of modifying such a calendar to simplify this (at the expense of adding a little lunar jitter). In this, the molad interval for any leap month is increased to exactly 30 days. The molad intervals of all the other months remain equal but are reduced a little to compensate for the increased interval for the leap months. The fractional part of the molad then increments by the same amount every year, rather than a different amount for leap month years.

For non-leap months, I reckoned a molad interval of 29 + 319/618 days would be quite accurate. Over a 12-month year, this becomes 354 + 20/103 days and over a 13-month year, this becomes 384 + 20/103 days (same fractional part makes calculations easier).
The following non-leap month molad interval of 29.516181 days would be accurate. Over a year, it would become 354.194172 or 384.194172 days.

For any of the lunar calendar cycles listed in my spreadsheets,
http://the-light.com/cal/kp_Lunisolar_xls.html
the fractional part of these molad intervals added up over a year is simply the value in the 3rd column "Abundant" divided by the number of years (1st column).
To get the fractional part of the non-leap month molad interval, divide by 12 and add a half.

The resulting calendar is similar to Robert Pontisso's Simple lunar calendar,
http://web.archive.org/web/20060501202828/www.geocities.com/rpontisso/lunisolar/lunisolarinstructions.html
but the abundant years (years in which Zeta has 30 days) are spread as smoothly as possible.

A formula for the molad interval for the non-leap months in terms of the desired mean month and the mean year of the solar calendar can be worked out from the formulae given in the description of my lunisolar spreadsheets.

Karl

Tuesday Delta March 2019


----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 26/03/2019 - 02:01 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/


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Re: Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

k.palmen@btinternet.com
Dear Ryan and Calendar People

Thank you Ryan, for letting me know. Please take care to avoid sending multiple copies of the same E-mail. Also please don't send any E-mails to both me directly and the list.

Karl

Thursday Delta March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 27/03/2019 - 23:49 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Karl: The other two are duplicate emails and would advise you to disregard the duplicate emails

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2019 1:11:22 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Triplicate E-mail Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Ryan and Calendar People 

Ryan seems to have sent the same E-mail THREE TIMES. I'll keep only one of these. If they are different, please explain what the differences are.

Karl

Wednesday Delta March 2019
----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 27/03/2019 - 01:00 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

On the topic of lunisolar calendars, I would like to give some insight of the one idea that I thought it would play out

 

The new year occurs on midnight the first new moon of the vernal equinox ie for 2019, according to Kalendis, new moon occurs on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr 08:50 UTC and the vernal equinox occurred at 21:58 UTC last Wednesday 2019.03.20-We. New months are determined as follows: If the new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then it’s the new month, however if it falls at 12:00 UTC or later then the following day will be the new month. In the event to determine the new year, if the vernal equinox and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC then the day is the new year [PROCEDURE A], and if the new moon and vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC then that day is New Year’s Eve and the following day is the new year [PROCEDURE B]. But what if the new moon occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and vernal equinox occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s the same result as Procedure C. However what if the vernal equinox occurs on or after 12:00 UTC and new moon occurs before 12:00 UTC? Then it’s NOT the new year and instead it’s the leap month and the next new moon (as late as April 18-20th) is the new year.

 

Given today’s date, 2019.03.27-We (as of UTC at time of email being sent, 01:00 UTC) it is 20th day of 12th month and the new year will occur on Friday 2019.04.05-Fr. Year numberings would go either the Holocene (Human) era (ie LS 12018/12/20 HE) or the common era (ie LS 2018/12/20 CE) or the number of years since the launch of the Julian day count offset and Julian Period/Era (JE) to the vernal equinox of 4713 BC (ie LS 6731/12/20 JE) in which it is 10 days away. Month names would be named by the Greek Alphabet (ie the current (12th) month is Mu, carried over from Simple Lunisolar calendar) This in conjunction of the Zodiac solar calendar (where the months are named by the zodiac and the new year being the day before 12:00 UTC or the following day after on or after 12:00 UTC and new months using same method as determining the new year every 30° elliptical longitude (Today on that calendar is Aries (first month) 6, 2019) would be used to determine which new moon falls on the zodiac and to determine the lunisolar new year. Both calendar systems are astronomical calendars (just like the Chinese and Persian calendars) and dates can be given via computer, mobile device or tablet and calendars can be generated and printed out. Of course due to time zones where dates may differ, UTC shall have to be used for determining such dates rather than local time.

 

PS: had to resend

 

Ryan Provost

RDK 3000-Tristar

Tilbury, ON, Canada

21:00:00.000 RDK - 04.166 666 EMT - 01.00:00[00] TRX

2019.03.26-Tu - TUESDAY, MARCH 26TH, 2019

MU 20 2018 LS/ARIES 6 2019 ZODIAC

E/EY 1019 EE ED085 ZL12 EW08 ZG2 EG5 CG7

70.25 EMD.M MLE/372.2.67 EMD.E ELE

Nu-Iota/Twozat-Fivede-Sevener

Gamma 25 1019 ESC - Gamma 13 1019 EDC - Gamma 17 1019 EWC - Gamma 03 1019 EWDC

Gamma 21 1019 ELSC - Zeta 21 1050 ELC - Gamma 17 1019 ELXC - Zeta 17 1050 ELWC

Eta 27 930 XD - Iota 20 930 XLD - Eta 17 930 XXD - Iota 16 930 XLXD

17982.041 666rm SEDT - 4m 389k 934 ZD - 1t 019n 232m 541k 850tm049 ELT

04ke 00si 00mt 00si ECX  - 01h 00kl 00ry 00tn EXT - 00xh 41xm 66xz 66xf XT

08me 8st 51dk D 04Ct 16sk 66nk 66ti SPT - 22ya 1mio 11di D 01Wt 66pt 66sd 66tc WCT

06:00:00.000 RKT/30:00:00.000 KKT Swampert 27, K.P 0014 - 01:00:00 UTC

25.000 000 KMT - 09:00:00:000 SOL - 00n 019m 789k 200s  APs

20:00:00 CDT - 19:00:00 MDT - 18:00:00 PDT - 02:00:00 CET

06:00:00 UNO/KAL - 05:00:00 ALP/HOV - 04:00:00 KT/JO/SN - 02:00:00 NOR

01:00:00 FRS - 07:00:00 STT - 05:00:00 MKDT - 07:15:00 YOT

Swampert 27, M.P 0019 - Swampert 27, A.P 0178 - Venusaur 27, KA.P 0023

Meganium 27, JO.P 0020 - Sceptile 27, HO.P 0017 - Torterra 27, SI.P 0013

Serperior 27, U.P 0009 - Chesnaught 27, KL.P 0006 - Decidueye 27, AL.P 0013

March 27, BE 2562 - March 27, ST.P 0004

022 454 041 666 S TSD [VYASEKANT 2245 FOURSDAY] - FRC ER 0227-07-06 00hd 48md 15sd TMP

19086.04166666 TLE EPH - 072.859D041.666 DTP - EXCEL PC: 43551.04166

EXCEL MAC: 42089.04166 - DAY 085 54:166.XTM, 2019 CE - JD 2458569.54166

]MJD 58569.04166 - STO STD 96838.47032 - D7 7.9166 Septem/Pearl 2019 TT - 54,166 GST

54.16 WRLD - 54.166 UMT - 015*00' NET - 51628.21530 MSD - @083 SIT

01n 553m 648k 400s UNIX - 0_AA_AA HEX - A:  0:60: 00/B:  01:00:00 DOZ

21-17(15(22 YLC/[01]112/12/22 MMG

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List <[hidden email]> on behalf of K PALMEN <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7:25:40 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Modern Lunisolar Calendars Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar
 
Dear Amos, Mockingbird and Other Calendar People

This lunisolar calendar makes use of an existing solar calendar (the Gregorian calendar) to determine which years have a leap month. I regard such calendars as modern to distinguish them from ancient lunisolar calendar, which determined the leap months by the 19-year cycle or some variant thereof.

The business of calculating the molad of Nisan is quite complicated. Some time ago, I found a way of modifying such a calendar to simplify this (at the expense of adding a little lunar jitter). In this, the molad interval for any leap month is increased to exactly 30 days. The molad intervals of all the other months remain equal but are reduced a little to compensate for the increased interval for the leap months. The fractional part of the molad then increments by the same amount every year, rather than a different amount for leap month years.

For non-leap months, I reckoned a molad interval of 29 + 319/618 days would be quite accurate. Over a 12-month year, this becomes 354 + 20/103 days and over a 13-month year, this becomes 384 + 20/103 days (same fractional part makes calculations easier).
The following non-leap month molad interval of 29.516181 days would be accurate. Over a year, it would become 354.194172 or 384.194172 days.

For any of the lunar calendar cycles listed in my spreadsheets,
http://the-light.com/cal/kp_Lunisolar_xls.html
the fractional part of these molad intervals added up over a year is simply the value in the 3rd column "Abundant" divided by the number of years (1st column).
To get the fractional part of the non-leap month molad interval, divide by 12 and add a half.

The resulting calendar is similar to Robert Pontisso's Simple lunar calendar,
http://web.archive.org/web/20060501202828/www.geocities.com/rpontisso/lunisolar/lunisolarinstructions.html
but the abundant years (years in which Zeta has 30 days) are spread as smoothly as possible.

A formula for the molad interval for the non-leap months in terms of the desired mean month and the mean year of the solar calendar can be worked out from the formulae given in the description of my lunisolar spreadsheets.

Karl

Tuesday Delta March 2019


----Original message----
From : [hidden email]
Date : 26/03/2019 - 02:01 (GMT)
To : [hidden email]
Subject : Re: A Rabbinic-style calendar

Hello Amos and calendar people.


Amos Shapir-2 wrote
> It may help if you can show how the constants in the presented formulas
> are computed.
> Amos Shapir

The synodic lunar month of 29.530589 days is taken from the /Astronomical
Almanac/ for 1990.  The mean conjunction on April 4th, 2000 is derived from
a mean conjunction on January 6th, 2000 that I got from /Calendrical
Calculations, Third Edition/.  The value of 10.632932 is 365 minus twelve
mean synodic lunar months.

Something I left out of my original post is that the limits of the Paschal
mean conjunction are .25 to 29.780588.  The value of .25 is the earliest
value that can give a date for 1 Nisan of March 8th.  The value of 29.780588
is .25 plus one synodic lunar month, less .000001.

A thing I want to know is, what happened to the raw text that I embedded in
my original post?  It showed up in the message's preview but then vanished
from the final post.



--
Sent from: http://calndr-l.10958.n7.nabble.com/