5-Day week for a possible SSW version

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5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Michael Ossipoff

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

sparkielee
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
MICHAEL O:

I don't know where you get 17 five day weeks in a year. The division I learned gives us 73. And you are going to piss off sabbatarians with a five-day week. I thought you were big on avoiding that. But I admit, my biggest concern is for your basic division skills. Remember what I said about a pointed head.

Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

sparkielee
Then the 7 or 10 day week would be better as far as work goes. I had a concern about time spent in the classroom or on homework-especially homework, as I said in my reply to Michael. I hope the kids and college students don't have longer school days. Some students may have problems at home because their parents are making it too difficult for them to get homework done since they may get most or all of the instead of the parents and/or siblings helping to ease the load of doing the chores in addition to homework.

There are several cultures in which women and girls have to cook, clean, and other work in the house regardless of whether they work outside of the house or not. Some men expect their wives and daughters to wait on them hand-and-foot even when they're not sick or handicapped. They boys may be given other or fewer chores. Sometimes a child may be treated like she's "Cinderella" and forced to work more than her sisters. And college and high school students have more homework than younger siblings. 

I seemed to have "jumped" from being "tied down" to one spot and made to do my homework when I was in elementary school, to parents not caring about my having enough time for homework when I was in high school and college and dipping into my homework time by expecting me to do the same amount of chores as I did in elementary school when I had a teenage or preteen brother who was at least in 7th grade whom I thought was capable of doing more than what he was required to do. I tried to get my parents not to "tie me down" that much with work when I had school and a job-but they told me I had "no bargaining power" and they'd kick me out of the house or threaten to to prove it once I turned 18 and was legally an adult.

Maybe there would need to be a PSA on TV and the radio saying, "Parents! The week is short-but your kids need time to do their homework!" 

Of course families always had problems and unrealistic expectations. I knew that for years. I can't blame the clock or calendar for this or expect a new clock or calendar to fix it.

Paula

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
PAULA:

Your situation sounds unique, at least in the USA. I have lived and travelled in other cultures where women and girls do not generally work, and wait on the men and boys. In fact, when I was a foreign exchange student I have BEEN waited on hand and foot, in spite of my offering to help, because I am male.

You're right. No calendar is going to fix a situation that we Americans may regard as unfair, but other cultures consider normal and expected. Neither will certain parents in the USA work with their children, even adult children, in relieving them from household responsibilities, even if the situation is objectively unfair to the child. And no calendar can fix that either. In a situation such as this, the only thing that MIGHT work is a family therapist, or perhaps a trusted clergyman, who can work with the parents on seeing their child as a human being, and not simply slave labour.

Jamison
5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Then the 7 or 10 day week would be better as far as work goes. I had a concern about time spent in the classroom or on homework-especially homework, as I said in my reply to Michael. I hope the kids and college students don't have longer school days. Some students may have problems at home because their parents are making it too difficult for them to get homework done since they may get most or all of the instead of the parents and/or siblings helping to ease the load of doing the chores in addition to homework.

There are several cultures in which women and girls have to cook, clean, and other work in the house regardless of whether they work outside of the house or not. Some men expect their wives and daughters to wait on them hand-and-foot even when they're not sick or handicapped. They boys may be given other or fewer chores. Sometimes a child may be treated like she's "Cinderella" and forced to work more than her sisters. And college and high school students have more homework than younger siblings. 

I seemed to have "jumped" from being "tied down" to one spot and made to do my homework when I was in elementary school, to parents not caring about my having enough time for homework when I was in high school and college and dipping into my homework time by expecting me to do the same amount of chores as I did in elementary school when I had a teenage or preteen brother who was at least in 7th grade whom I thought was capable of doing more than what he was required to do. I tried to get my parents not to "tie me down" that much with work when I had school and a job-but they told me I had "no bargaining power" and they'd kick me out of the house or threaten to to prove it once I turned 18 and was legally an adult.

Maybe there would need to be a PSA on TV and the radio saying, "Parents! The week is short-but your kids need time to do their homework!" 

Of course families always had problems and unrealistic expectations. I knew that for years. I can't blame the clock or calendar for this or expect a new clock or calendar to fix it.

Paula

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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(3.5+1.5)-day 9h Work Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
Jamison, Michael, Walter Cc sirs:
This take ne back to late 1980’s-early 1990’s while I was calculating my SIX (6) day Leap Week plan. I do not have my older notes but can ‘shuffle’ my mind to retrieve and make these afresh. AGAIN, to what purpose, since I am given to understand Calndr-L is not working for any serious proposal. I am willing to reconcile with THIS FACT from the sudden up-swollen filling of my INBOX. 
There is a possibility to have extended Leap Week of six(6) days once in 4-years or a 5-day Leap Week in about 28-years! 
I think I may need time to re-work details, where from I need to pick up the thread?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd)., IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 24H13:43 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2019, at 13:07, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

Your situation sounds unique, at least in the USA. I have lived and travelled in other cultures where women and girls do not generally work, and wait on the men and boys. In fact, when I was a foreign exchange student I have BEEN waited on hand and foot, in spite of my offering to help, because I am male.

You're right. No calendar is going to fix a situation that we Americans may regard as unfair, but other cultures consider normal and expected. Neither will certain parents in the USA work with their children, even adult children, in relieving them from household responsibilities, even if the situation is objectively unfair to the child. And no calendar can fix that either. In a situation such as this, the only thing that MIGHT work is a family therapist, or perhaps a trusted clergyman, who can work with the parents on seeing their child as a human being, and not simply slave labour.

Jamison
5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Then the 7 or 10 day week would be better as far as work goes. I had a concern about time spent in the classroom or on homework-especially homework, as I said in my reply to Michael. I hope the kids and college students don't have longer school days. Some students may have problems at home because their parents are making it too difficult for them to get homework done since they may get most or all of the instead of the parents and/or siblings helping to ease the load of doing the chores in addition to homework.

There are several cultures in which women and girls have to cook, clean, and other work in the house regardless of whether they work outside of the house or not. Some men expect their wives and daughters to wait on them hand-and-foot even when they're not sick or handicapped. They boys may be given other or fewer chores. Sometimes a child may be treated like she's "Cinderella" and forced to work more than her sisters. And college and high school students have more homework than younger siblings. 

I seemed to have "jumped" from being "tied down" to one spot and made to do my homework when I was in elementary school, to parents not caring about my having enough time for homework when I was in high school and college and dipping into my homework time by expecting me to do the same amount of chores as I did in elementary school when I had a teenage or preteen brother who was at least in 7th grade whom I thought was capable of doing more than what he was required to do. I tried to get my parents not to "tie me down" that much with work when I had school and a job-but they told me I had "no bargaining power" and they'd kick me out of the house or threaten to to prove it once I turned 18 and was legally an adult.

Maybe there would need to be a PSA on TV and the radio saying, "Parents! The week is short-but your kids need time to do their homework!" 

Of course families always had problems and unrealistic expectations. I knew that for years. I can't blame the clock or calendar for this or expect a new clock or calendar to fix it.

Paula

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: (3.5+1.5)-day 9h Work Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT:

I would be interested in seeing your plans if you can get them.

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jamison, Michael, Walter Cc sirs:
This take ne back to late 1980’s-early 1990’s while I was calculating my SIX (6) day Leap Week plan. I do not have my older notes but can ‘shuffle’ my mind to retrieve and make these afresh. AGAIN, to what purpose, since I am given to understand Calndr-L is not working for any serious proposal. I am willing to reconcile with THIS FACT from the sudden up-swollen filling of my INBOX. 
There is a possibility to have extended Leap Week of six(6) days once in 4-years or a 5-day Leap Week in about 28-years! 
I think I may need time to re-work details, where from I need to pick up the thread?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd)., IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 24H13:43 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2019, at 13:07, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

Your situation sounds unique, at least in the USA. I have lived and travelled in other cultures where women and girls do not generally work, and wait on the men and boys. In fact, when I was a foreign exchange student I have BEEN waited on hand and foot, in spite of my offering to help, because I am male.

You're right. No calendar is going to fix a situation that we Americans may regard as unfair, but other cultures consider normal and expected. Neither will certain parents in the USA work with their children, even adult children, in relieving them from household responsibilities, even if the situation is objectively unfair to the child. And no calendar can fix that either. In a situation such as this, the only thing that MIGHT work is a family therapist, or perhaps a trusted clergyman, who can work with the parents on seeing their child as a human being, and not simply slave labour.

Jamison
5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Then the 7 or 10 day week would be better as far as work goes. I had a concern about time spent in the classroom or on homework-especially homework, as I said in my reply to Michael. I hope the kids and college students don't have longer school days. Some students may have problems at home because their parents are making it too difficult for them to get homework done since they may get most or all of the instead of the parents and/or siblings helping to ease the load of doing the chores in addition to homework.

There are several cultures in which women and girls have to cook, clean, and other work in the house regardless of whether they work outside of the house or not. Some men expect their wives and daughters to wait on them hand-and-foot even when they're not sick or handicapped. They boys may be given other or fewer chores. Sometimes a child may be treated like she's "Cinderella" and forced to work more than her sisters. And college and high school students have more homework than younger siblings. 

I seemed to have "jumped" from being "tied down" to one spot and made to do my homework when I was in elementary school, to parents not caring about my having enough time for homework when I was in high school and college and dipping into my homework time by expecting me to do the same amount of chores as I did in elementary school when I had a teenage or preteen brother who was at least in 7th grade whom I thought was capable of doing more than what he was required to do. I tried to get my parents not to "tie me down" that much with work when I had school and a job-but they told me I had "no bargaining power" and they'd kick me out of the house or threaten to to prove it once I turned 18 and was legally an adult.

Maybe there would need to be a PSA on TV and the radio saying, "Parents! The week is short-but your kids need time to do their homework!" 

Of course families always had problems and unrealistic expectations. I knew that for years. I can't blame the clock or calendar for this or expect a new clock or calendar to fix it.

Paula

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: (3.5+1.5)-day 9h Work Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Walter J Ziobro
In reply to this post by Brij Bhushan metric VIJ

Dear Brij

Indeed, for a "lost cause" this list is generating a lot of activity

Walter Ziobro




On Wednesday, April 24, 2019 Brij Bhushan metric VIJ <[hidden email]> wrote:

Jamison, Michael, Walter Cc sirs:
This take ne back to late 1980’s-early 1990’s while I was calculating my SIX (6) day Leap Week plan. I do not have my older notes but can ‘shuffle’ my mind to retrieve and make these afresh. AGAIN, to what purpose, since I am given to understand Calndr-L is not working for any serious proposal. I am willing to reconcile with THIS FACT from the sudden up-swollen filling of my INBOX. 
There is a possibility to have extended Leap Week of six(6) days once in 4-years or a 5-day Leap Week in about 28-years! 
I think I may need time to re-work details, where from I need to pick up the thread?
Thanks & regards,
Flt Lt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd)., IAF ✈️
Wednesday, 2019 April 24H13:43 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2019, at 13:07, Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:

PAULA:

Your situation sounds unique, at least in the USA. I have lived and travelled in other cultures where women and girls do not generally work, and wait on the men and boys. In fact, when I was a foreign exchange student I have BEEN waited on hand and foot, in spite of my offering to help, because I am male.

You're right. No calendar is going to fix a situation that we Americans may regard as unfair, but other cultures consider normal and expected. Neither will certain parents in the USA work with their children, even adult children, in relieving them from household responsibilities, even if the situation is objectively unfair to the child. And no calendar can fix that either. In a situation such as this, the only thing that MIGHT work is a family therapist, or perhaps a trusted clergyman, who can work with the parents on seeing their child as a human being, and not simply slave labour.

Jamison
5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Then the 7 or 10 day week would be better as far as work goes. I had a concern about time spent in the classroom or on homework-especially homework, as I said in my reply to Michael. I hope the kids and college students don't have longer school days. Some students may have problems at home because their parents are making it too difficult for them to get homework done since they may get most or all of the instead of the parents and/or siblings helping to ease the load of doing the chores in addition to homework.

There are several cultures in which women and girls have to cook, clean, and other work in the house regardless of whether they work outside of the house or not. Some men expect their wives and daughters to wait on them hand-and-foot even when they're not sick or handicapped. They boys may be given other or fewer chores. Sometimes a child may be treated like she's "Cinderella" and forced to work more than her sisters. And college and high school students have more homework than younger siblings. 

I seemed to have "jumped" from being "tied down" to one spot and made to do my homework when I was in elementary school, to parents not caring about my having enough time for homework when I was in high school and college and dipping into my homework time by expecting me to do the same amount of chores as I did in elementary school when I had a teenage or preteen brother who was at least in 7th grade whom I thought was capable of doing more than what he was required to do. I tried to get my parents not to "tie me down" that much with work when I had school and a job-but they told me I had "no bargaining power" and they'd kick me out of the house or threaten to to prove it once I turned 18 and was legally an adult.

Maybe there would need to be a PSA on TV and the radio saying, "Parents! The week is short-but your kids need time to do their homework!" 

Of course families always had problems and unrealistic expectations. I knew that for years. I can't blame the clock or calendar for this or expect a new clock or calendar to fix it.

Paula

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day. I simply don't see it flying at all.

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

 As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.


Of course I meant that there are 73 5-day weeks in a year.

Michael Ossipoff

18 W
Kvin 2 W
2339 UTC




 
So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by sparkielee
Paula--

Yes, having weekends the same as now, but fewer work or school days inbetween sounds better. With a longer week, you'd have more time-off on weekends, but would have work or attend class longer between weekends.

Maybe the appeal and advantage of the time-off increases less than proportionally to the number of days-off. ...the first days off being the more important, and the later days off adding less.

Someone could say that long weekends with a 10-week calendar would be better because there's time for long travelling weekends. But this is a time in Earth-history when long-travel for fun might not be so good, considering the unnecessary use of limited energy, likely putting additional CO2 into he air.  ...at a time when we can't be wasting energy or putting-out unnecessary CO2.

So there's nothing wrong with stay-at-home weekends.  So we wouldn't have or need the extra-long weekends of a 10-day week, and our sequences of work or school days would be shorter. If someone is getting tired during the work or school week now, they'd reach the restful weekend sooner, with a 5-day week.

We'd still need leapyears, but they' be much farther apart. With each calendar starting with the Monday that starts nearest to the South-Solstice (or an approxmation too the South-Solstice based on the assumption that there's a South-Solstice exactly every 365.2422 days, starting from the actual South-Solstice of 2017), then there'd be a leapyear roughly every 20 years.

A leapyear would automatically have 74 weeks instead of 73. 

(...just as, with 7-day weeks, a leapyear automatically has 53 weeks instead of 52.  With 7-dayi weeks, there's a leapyear every 5 or 6 years.)

I like year-start rules like the above-described Nearest-Monday, which make each year start on the same day of the week, resulting in an occasional automatic leapyear, better than having intercalary days, because I don't like interrupting the week with intercalary days.

A result of Nearest-Monday, or other year-start rules that result in an extra week for leapyears, is that those year-start rules cause a seasonal-inaccuracy of up to half a week (instead of half a day, like the intercalary day calendars).  That's alright, because the the weather''s variation from year to year is enough to obscure that inaccuracy anyway.

.Michael Ossipoff

Kvin 2 Th
18 Th
0004 UTC




On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 2:56 PM Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,



And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
Well, how could you have meant it and not said it? It is not possible, unless one has severely deformed hands, to mistakenly type 17 instead of 73 on an English keyboard. I still question your math skills. I think it comes from having a tiny brain in that pointed head of yours.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

 As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.


Of course I meant that there are 73 5-day weeks in a year.

Michael Ossipoff

18 W
Kvin 2 W
2339 UTC




 
So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
This one is too long for me to get to right now, but get to it I shall, probably tomorrow. There is plenty that needs to be said about it.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula--

Yes, having weekends the same as now, but fewer work or school days inbetween sounds better. With a longer week, you'd have more time-off on weekends, but would have work or attend class longer between weekends.

Maybe the appeal and advantage of the time-off increases less than proportionally to the number of days-off. ...the first days off being the more important, and the later days off adding less.

Someone could say that long weekends with a 10-week calendar would be better because there's time for long travelling weekends. But this is a time in Earth-history when long-travel for fun might not be so good, considering the unnecessary use of limited energy, likely putting additional CO2 into he air.  ...at a time when we can't be wasting energy or putting-out unnecessary CO2.

So there's nothing wrong with stay-at-home weekends.  So we wouldn't have or need the extra-long weekends of a 10-day week, and our sequences of work or school days would be shorter. If someone is getting tired during the work or school week now, they'd reach the restful weekend sooner, with a 5-day week.

We'd still need leapyears, but they' be much farther apart. With each calendar starting with the Monday that starts nearest to the South-Solstice (or an approxmation too the South-Solstice based on the assumption that there's a South-Solstice exactly every 365.2422 days, starting from the actual South-Solstice of 2017), then there'd be a leapyear roughly every 20 years.

A leapyear would automatically have 74 weeks instead of 73. 

(...just as, with 7-day weeks, a leapyear automatically has 53 weeks instead of 52.  With 7-dayi weeks, there's a leapyear every 5 or 6 years.)

I like year-start rules like the above-described Nearest-Monday, which make each year start on the same day of the week, resulting in an occasional automatic leapyear, better than having intercalary days, because I don't like interrupting the week with intercalary days.

A result of Nearest-Monday, or other year-start rules that result in an extra week for leapyears, is that those year-start rules cause a seasonal-inaccuracy of up to half a week (instead of half a day, like the intercalary day calendars).  That's alright, because the the weather''s variation from year to year is enough to obscure that inaccuracy anyway.

.Michael Ossipoff

Kvin 2 Th
18 Th
0004 UTC




On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 2:56 PM Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,



And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day.

I can' believe that anyone at this mailing-list would say that.

Jamison, the amount of work accomplished per year would depend on 1) the number of work-hour per working-day; and 2) the percentage of the week's days that are working-days

It isn't meaningful to compare work-hours per week, for weeks of different lengths  :D

With 3 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 60%.

With 5 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 5/7, or about 71.4 %.

That's alright, because there are currently calls for a smaller percentage of the week's and year's hours as work-hours.
--------------------------------------------------
I don't want to sound like Jamison, and so I'm not going state a characterization, or comment on what sort of a person would say something like Jamison said in the above quote.

Michael Ossipoff
18 Th
Kvin 2 Th
0039 UTC

.


 

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Michael Ossipoff
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter

And you are going to piss off sabbatarians with a five-day week. I thought you were big on avoiding that.

I said that my proposal was for the day when the cows come home.

I didn't say that my proposal could be acceptable anytime soon, given what happened with FRC, Eastman's International-Fixed, and Achellis' World-Calendar.

Though there almost surely won't be any calendar-reform, I usually try to avoid the calendar-attributes that have proven to be entirely unacceptable...though it doesn't matter if it can't happen anyway, and though it isn't possible what people might like, want or accept in some hypothtical fictional future when they want calendar-reform.

But I was quite explicit, in my post, about the fact that I'm not proposing a 5-day week for any time soon.

Michael Ossipoff
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
Michael, it does matter. You can't work a forty-hour week when you are getting MORE days off. And there is a HUGE difference between 60% and 71.4%. And there have been calls to reduce the hours that are work-hours for years. It hasn't worked. And it won't. I know you are terrible at math (the difference between 17 and 73?), and may not be able to RECOGNISE that 60% and 71.4% are hugely different, but they are. And I thought I was bad at math.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day.

I can' believe that anyone at this mailing-list would say that.

Jamison, the amount of work accomplished per year would depend on 1) the number of work-hour per working-day; and 2) the percentage of the week's days that are working-days

It isn't meaningful to compare work-hours per week, for weeks of different lengths  :D

With 3 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 60%.

With 5 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 5/7, or about 71.4 %.

That's alright, because there are currently calls for a smaller percentage of the week's and year's hours as work-hours.
--------------------------------------------------
I don't want to sound like Jamison, and so I'm not going state a characterization, or comment on what sort of a person would say something like Jamison said in the above quote.

Michael Ossipoff
18 Th
Kvin 2 Th
0039 UTC

.


 

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
I have stated it before, and I shall state again. MICHAEL O, you have a pointed head. And the correspondingly small brain that that entails. I am going to respond to your long email tomorrow. There is so much in there to chew up that I just don't have time to do it tonight.

Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day.

I can' believe that anyone at this mailing-list would say that.

Jamison, the amount of work accomplished per year would depend on 1) the number of work-hour per working-day; and 2) the percentage of the week's days that are working-days

It isn't meaningful to compare work-hours per week, for weeks of different lengths  :D

With 3 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 60%.

With 5 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 5/7, or about 71.4 %.

That's alright, because there are currently calls for a smaller percentage of the week's and year's hours as work-hours.
--------------------------------------------------
I don't want to sound like Jamison, and so I'm not going state a characterization, or comment on what sort of a person would say something like Jamison said in the above quote.

Michael Ossipoff
18 Th
Kvin 2 Th
0039 UTC

.


 

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
This one is going to be FUN to chew up. So: Here we go:

On Wednesday, April 24, 2019, Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula--

Yes, having weekends the same as now, but fewer work or school days inbetween sounds better. With a longer week, you'd have more time-off on weekends, but would have work or attend class longer between weekends.

If you still have two-day weekends, which you have NOT said is different under new week lengths, you are getting less time off with a weekend. 2 days every Decade (8 days worked, 2 days off) is less time off than six days worked, 2 days off. Where did you learn math, I shall ask again.

Maybe the appeal and advantage of the time-off increases less than proportionally to the number of days-off. ...the first days off being the more important, and the later days off adding less.

Someone could say that long weekends with a 10-week calendar

Now, if you add more days to the weekend, ok. That DOES change the math. 

would be better because there's time for long travelling weekends. But this is a time in Earth-history when long-travel for fun might not be so good, considering the unnecessary use of limited energy, likely putting additional CO2 into he air.  ...at a time when we can't be wasting energy or putting-out unnecessary CO2.

So, you are a left-winger who believes all that crap about climate change that hasn't been proven one way or the other. Why am I not surprised. But it is ancillary to the argument at hand, so I shan't comment further, other than to say this ALSO leads me to question your intellect. 

So there's nothing wrong with stay-at-home weekends.  So we wouldn't have or need the extra-long weekends of a 10-day week, and our sequences of work or school days would be shorter. If someone is getting tired during the work or school week now, they'd reach the restful weekend sooner, with a 5-day week.

And we would have the problem I brought up before. Working three days, and getting two off, means you are working less than working FIVE days, and getting two off. I cannot for the life of me figure out why this is so hard to figure out for you. 

We'd still need leapyears, but they' be much farther apart. With each calendar starting with the Monday that starts nearest to the South-Solstice (or an approxmation too the South-Solstice based on the assumption that there's a South-Solstice exactly every 365.2422 days, starting from the actual South-Solstice of 2017), then there'd be a leapyear roughly every 20 years.

A leap year would still have to be every four years. Unless the Earth you live on has a different speed at which it goes around the Sun than the Earth the rest of us live on. 

A leapyear would automatically have 74 weeks instead of 73. 

(...just as, with 7-day weeks, a leapyear automatically has 53 weeks instead of 52.  With 7-dayi weeks, there's a leapyear every 5 or 6 years.)

Apparently you haven't noticed that we have leap years ever four years, not counting century years, which follow the 4/100/400 Rule. Unless you are working with a radically different calendar than what the rest of us are using. But any calendar that is dealing with a year of 365.2422 ( I prefer to use what I BELIEVE is the Tropical Year [I get those two mixed up] but that's as may be) days is going to need to leap every four years, regardless of the length of the week, and you will need to make a rule for century years. 

I like year-start rules like the above-described Nearest-Monday, which make each year start on the same day of the week, resulting in an occasional automatic leapyear, better than having intercalary days, because I don't like interrupting the week with intercalary days.

A result of Nearest-Monday, or other year-start rules that result in an extra week for leapyears, is that those year-start rules cause a seasonal-inaccuracy of up to half a week (instead of half a day, like the intercalary day calendars).  That's alright, because the the weather''s variation from year to year is enough to obscure that inaccuracy anyway.

Surpisingly, I cannot find anything to argue with in these two paragraphs. Amazing! 

.Michael Ossipoff

Kvin 2 Th
18 Th
0004 UTC

Jamison

6 Floreal CCXXVII, Columbine
6 Octavus I, Mazoni




On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 2:56 PM Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,



And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W


--
"You must be the change you want to see in the world."

Mahatma Gandhi

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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
In reply to this post by Michael Ossipoff
Michael, all;
>Of course I meant that there are 73 5-day weeks in a year.
I have been watching quite s bit of pin-pricks ; which happen among friends!

BrijVij

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 24, 2019, at 17:39, Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:



On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 3:11 PM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
PAULA:
The problem with that is that a three-day work-week does not allow for 40 hours a week unless you work 13.3 hours a day. I don't think ANYBODY is going to volunteer for that, and working less than 40 hours a week means less gets done. I don't anticipate modern industry, or any other field of work, being too happy with that. Even if you go with France's 35-hour work-week, you have to work 11.7 hours a day.

I can' believe that anyone at this mailing-list would say that.

Jamison, the amount of work accomplished per year would depend on 1) the number of work-hour per working-day; and 2) the percentage of the week's days that are working-days

It isn't meaningful to compare work-hours per week, for weeks of different lengths  :D

With 3 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 60%.

With 5 days on and 2 days off, that percentage is 5/7, or about 71.4 %.

That's alright, because there are currently calls for a smaller percentage of the week's and year's hours as work-hours.
--------------------------------------------------
I don't want to sound like Jamison, and so I'm not going state a characterization, or comment on what sort of a person would say something like Jamison said in the above quote.

Michael Ossipoff
18 Th
Kvin 2 Th
0039 UTC

.


 

Regards,
Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Nightingale
5 Octavus I, Walter Scott

Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,

This is a neat idea! After learning about the FRC and its 10 day weeks, we can have just make our weeks half the length of theirs. You can work 3 days a week, take 2 days off and then repeat the schedule. I've been wanting more weekend and less work and school days. 

I don't know how that would affect the amount of homework the kids must do on the days off. The parents may just have to make sure the kids have time to do it. But then in a 10 day (2 week period) you have a total of 6 days of school and 4 days off. 

And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W
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Re: 5-Day week for a possible SSW version

Jamison Painter
In reply to this post by Jamison Painter
And I should have added that the year I prefer to work with has 365.2425 years, the Tropical Year (unless I have got those two mixed up again, which is possible). Also, I misspelled the day on my calendar for the date.

Jamison

5 Floreal CCXXVII, Columbine
5 Octavus I, Manzoni
"You must be the change you want to see in the world."

Mahatma Gandhi


On Thu, Apr 25, 2019 at 5:09 AM Jamison Painter <[hidden email]> wrote:
This one is going to be FUN to chew up. So: Here we go:

On Wednesday, April 24, 2019, Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paula--

Yes, having weekends the same as now, but fewer work or school days inbetween sounds better. With a longer week, you'd have more time-off on weekends, but would have work or attend class longer between weekends.

If you still have two-day weekends, which you have NOT said is different under new week lengths, you are getting less time off with a weekend. 2 days every Decade (8 days worked, 2 days off) is less time off than six days worked, 2 days off. Where did you learn math, I shall ask again.

Maybe the appeal and advantage of the time-off increases less than proportionally to the number of days-off. ...the first days off being the more important, and the later days off adding less.

Someone could say that long weekends with a 10-week calendar

Now, if you add more days to the weekend, ok. That DOES change the math. 

would be better because there's time for long travelling weekends. But this is a time in Earth-history when long-travel for fun might not be so good, considering the unnecessary use of limited energy, likely putting additional CO2 into he air.  ...at a time when we can't be wasting energy or putting-out unnecessary CO2.

So, you are a left-winger who believes all that crap about climate change that hasn't been proven one way or the other. Why am I not surprised. But it is ancillary to the argument at hand, so I shan't comment further, other than to say this ALSO leads me to question your intellect. 

So there's nothing wrong with stay-at-home weekends.  So we wouldn't have or need the extra-long weekends of a 10-day week, and our sequences of work or school days would be shorter. If someone is getting tired during the work or school week now, they'd reach the restful weekend sooner, with a 5-day week.

And we would have the problem I brought up before. Working three days, and getting two off, means you are working less than working FIVE days, and getting two off. I cannot for the life of me figure out why this is so hard to figure out for you. 

We'd still need leapyears, but they' be much farther apart. With each calendar starting with the Monday that starts nearest to the South-Solstice (or an approxmation too the South-Solstice based on the assumption that there's a South-Solstice exactly every 365.2422 days, starting from the actual South-Solstice of 2017), then there'd be a leapyear roughly every 20 years.

A leap year would still have to be every four years. Unless the Earth you live on has a different speed at which it goes around the Sun than the Earth the rest of us live on. 

A leapyear would automatically have 74 weeks instead of 73. 

(...just as, with 7-day weeks, a leapyear automatically has 53 weeks instead of 52.  With 7-dayi weeks, there's a leapyear every 5 or 6 years.)

Apparently you haven't noticed that we have leap years ever four years, not counting century years, which follow the 4/100/400 Rule. Unless you are working with a radically different calendar than what the rest of us are using. But any calendar that is dealing with a year of 365.2422 ( I prefer to use what I BELIEVE is the Tropical Year [I get those two mixed up] but that's as may be) days is going to need to leap every four years, regardless of the length of the week, and you will need to make a rule for century years. 

I like year-start rules like the above-described Nearest-Monday, which make each year start on the same day of the week, resulting in an occasional automatic leapyear, better than having intercalary days, because I don't like interrupting the week with intercalary days.

A result of Nearest-Monday, or other year-start rules that result in an extra week for leapyears, is that those year-start rules cause a seasonal-inaccuracy of up to half a week (instead of half a day, like the intercalary day calendars).  That's alright, because the the weather''s variation from year to year is enough to obscure that inaccuracy anyway.

Surpisingly, I cannot find anything to argue with in these two paragraphs. Amazing! 

.Michael Ossipoff

Kvin 2 Th
18 Th
0004 UTC

Jamison

6 Floreal CCXXVII, Columbine
6 Octavus I, Mazoni




On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 2:56 PM Paula Spart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Michael,



And you're right, 365 is divisible by 5. We may still have to add another day to the year every 4 years as a leap year though. As long as we don't have a "leap year" on this calendar, we don't need any extracalary days. If someone wants an end of year festival of 5 days, it can still be done, but it would be a perfect 5 day week-not 5 extra days which don't belong to a week or a month. It may be nice to take a week or more off every year to relax and have some fun-besides your "paid vacation."

Paula

Paula


On Wed, Apr 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Michael Ossipoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

7-day weeks are an excellent match to a 365 day year, because, as we all know, 364 is divisible by 7.

But of course it's possible to do even bettter. As we all likewise know, 365 is divisible by 5.. There'd be 17 5-day weeks in a year.

So, for the time when the cows come home, I propose, as a suggestion only, a WeekDate calendar with a 5-day week.

It would be identical to South-Solstice WeekDate, but with 5-day weeks.

Weekends would be like now, but work and school days between weekends would be fewer.

Michael Ossipoff
18W
Kvin 2 W


--
"You must be the change you want to see in the world."

Mahatma Gandhi

12