29 February in civil calendars

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
2 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

29 February in civil calendars

Claus Tøndering
Dear calendar people,

To the best of my knowledge, leap years have always been determined
based on a year that starts on 1 January, regardless of the new year's
date used for civil calendars.

For example, in England (where the civil year before 1752 started on 25
March), 1703 should have been a leap year because 29 February 1703
(civil) corresponds to 29 February 1704 (historical), and 1704 is
divisible by 4.

But I have never actually seen a document dated 29 February 1703 (or
some other similar year). Does anyone have an example of such a
document? Or is my understanding wrong?

Best wishes,
Claus Tøndering
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 29 February in civil calendars

Ulf Ravn
Samuel Pepys diary for January 1 1664 (civil) has the year as 1663/1664.
There is an entry for February 29 that year. February 28 is "the day of
our Lord"

Regards
Ulf

On 22-01-2019 10:09, Claus Tøndering wrote:

> Dear calendar people,
>
> To the best of my knowledge, leap years have always been determined
> based on a year that starts on 1 January, regardless of the new year's
> date used for civil calendars.
>
> For example, in England (where the civil year before 1752 started on
> 25 March), 1703 should have been a leap year because 29 February 1703
> (civil) corresponds to 29 February 1704 (historical), and 1704 is
> divisible by 4.
>
> But I have never actually seen a document dated 29 February 1703 (or
> some other similar year). Does anyone have an example of such a
> document? Or is my understanding wrong?
>
> Best wishes,
> Claus Tøndering
>