2094 Eclipse

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2094 Eclipse

Victor Engel
Dear Calendar People,

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

Victor
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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Karl Palmen

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor

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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

Such eclipses are pretty rare.

 

Using

 

  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html

 

I find between 1500 and 2500 (including maximum magnitude and Saros number)

 

North Pole

 

1769 Jun 04  1.066 114

1815 Jul 06  1.059 143

2015 Mar 20  1.039 120

2214 Jul 08  1.029 130

 

South Pole

 

2094 Jan 16  1.034 152

2112 Jan 29  1.034 152

 

This something that Jean Meeus has probably already published somewhere but I have not yet checked.

 

rvg

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: 25 August 2017 16:14
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor

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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Victor Engel
Wow - that 2015 one is before the March equinox. If it includes the north pole, it must be due to atmospheric refraction.

Victor

On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 9:52 AM, Gent, R.H. van (Rob) <[hidden email]> wrote:

Such eclipses are pretty rare.

 

Using

 

  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html

 

I find between 1500 and 2500 (including maximum magnitude and Saros number)

 

North Pole

 

1769 Jun 04  1.066 114

1815 Jul 06  1.059 143

2015 Mar 20  1.039 120

2214 Jul 08  1.029 130

 

South Pole

 

2094 Jan 16  1.034 152

2112 Jan 29  1.034 152

 

This something that Jean Meeus has probably already published somewhere but I have not yet checked.

 

rvg

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: 25 August 2017 16:14
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor


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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

A simulation with

 

  http://skyviewcafe.com/

 

shows that with refraction the solar disk was slightly above the visible horizon.

 

Set the time to 10:17 UTC.

 

Apparently without refraction, see

 

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHSmZhmazl4

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 17:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Wow - that 2015 one is before the March equinox. If it includes the north pole, it must be due to atmospheric refraction.

 

Victor

 

On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 9:52 AM, Gent, R.H. van (Rob) <[hidden email]> wrote:

Such eclipses are pretty rare.

 

Using

 

  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html

 

I find between 1500 and 2500 (including maximum magnitude and Saros number)

 

North Pole

 

1769 Jun 04  1.066 114

1815 Jul 06  1.059 143

2015 Mar 20  1.039 120

2214 Jul 08  1.029 130

 

South Pole

 

2094 Jan 16  1.034 152

2112 Jan 29  1.034 152

 

This something that Jean Meeus has probably already published somewhere but I have not yet checked.

 

rvg

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: 25 August 2017 16:14
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor

 

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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Victor Engel
In reply to this post by Victor Engel
If I try visualizing the 2015 eclipse from the North Pole using Stellarium, there is actually not an eclipse. The moon appears to be above the sun. Can anyone suggest a reason for this? Is it, perhaps, because of errors in calculations at the North Pole? I note that some online calculators don't allow calculations at the North Pole but substitute, say, 89.8 degrees instead.

Victor

On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 10:43 AM, Victor Engel <[hidden email]> wrote:
Wow - that 2015 one is before the March equinox. If it includes the north pole, it must be due to atmospheric refraction.

Victor

On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 9:52 AM, Gent, R.H. van (Rob) <[hidden email]> wrote:

Such eclipses are pretty rare.

 

Using

 

  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html

 

I find between 1500 and 2500 (including maximum magnitude and Saros number)

 

North Pole

 

1769 Jun 04  1.066 114

1815 Jul 06  1.059 143

2015 Mar 20  1.039 120

2214 Jul 08  1.029 130

 

South Pole

 

2094 Jan 16  1.034 152

2112 Jan 29  1.034 152

 

This something that Jean Meeus has probably already published somewhere but I have not yet checked.

 

rvg

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: 25 August 2017 16:14
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor



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Re: 2094 Eclipse

Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
In reply to this post by Gent, R.H. van (Rob)

Jean Meeus, in _Mathematical Astronomy Morsels IV_ (Richmond: Willmann-Bell, 2007), pp. 40-43, also predicted that the eclipsed sun of 20 March 2015 would be just above the visible horizon.

 

rvg

 

From: Gent, R.H. van (Rob)
Sent: 25 August 2017 18:01
To: 'East Carolina University Calendar discussion List'
Subject: RE: 2094 Eclipse

 

A simulation with

 

  http://skyviewcafe.com/

 

shows that with refraction the solar disk was slightly above the visible horizon.

 

Set the time to 10:17 UTC.

 

Apparently without refraction, see

 

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHSmZhmazl4

 

rvg

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 17:43
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Wow - that 2015 one is before the March equinox. If it includes the north pole, it must be due to atmospheric refraction.

 

Victor

 

On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 9:52 AM, Gent, R.H. van (Rob) <[hidden email]> wrote:

Such eclipses are pretty rare.

 

Using

 

  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html

 

I find between 1500 and 2500 (including maximum magnitude and Saros number)

 

North Pole

 

1769 Jun 04  1.066 114

1815 Jul 06  1.059 143

2015 Mar 20  1.039 120

2214 Jul 08  1.029 130

 

South Pole

 

2094 Jan 16  1.034 152

2112 Jan 29  1.034 152

 

This something that Jean Meeus has probably already published somewhere but I have not yet checked.

 

rvg

 

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Karl Palmen
Sent: 25 August 2017 16:14
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Victor  and Calendar People

 

There is a Wikipedia page for this eclipse, which has a picture of its path. See

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_16,_2094

 

Karl

 

16(13(04

 

From: East Carolina University Calendar discussion List [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Victor Engel
Sent: 25 August 2017 15:03
To: [hidden email]
Subject: 2094 Eclipse

 

Dear Calendar People,

 

Yesterday I was looking at various total eclipses, and the January 2094 one caught my eye. It's unique because the path of the shadow goes north and south at the same time (in fact east and west and every other direction as well), because it crosses the South Pole.

 

Victor

 

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2017 lunar Re: 2094 Eclipse

Brij Bhushan metric VIJ
rvg, cc sirs:
> Jean Meeus, in _Mathematical Astronomy >Morsels IV_ (Richmond: Willmann-Bell, >2007), pp. 40-43, also predicted that the >eclipsed sun of 20 March 2015 would be >just above the visible horizon.
And, no one expressed 'such fear fobia' ; as had been these days for 2017 Aug.21 Eclipse?
Occurance of Eclipse is a natural phenomenon, but occultism has brought it to different platform. My projected results to Reform, if desired, are: (1) Mean Year=(365+ 31/128)=365.2421875 days; and (2) Mean Lunation=[(448x365.2421875)+0.49287326 Day/5541]=29.53058886 Days=29d12h44m 2s.877504. This is perhaps the ever best calculated result desired for the Reform of Gregorian calendar.
Modification to Hebrew Lunar (Molad) calendar is welcome to align 'ideas floating' between East & West. I must congratulate Amos, Walter, Karl and others for their efforts to 'developing their software' - since I have only 'extended' the use of Tithivalue =966/965 improved to 1 338/326919 day from my 896-year/327257 d/11082 moons.
Extension in little time, I point, make up for the EXTRA Moon (self-absorbed) over 26842-years, as projected - say, close to a cycle of Precession!
This becomes a meaningful result,
Regards,
Ex-FltLt Brij Bhushan VIJ (Retd.), Author
Brij-Gregorian Modifued Calendar
Friday, 2017 August 25 H 14:26 (decimal)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 25, 2017, at 9:49 AM, Gent, R.H. van (Rob) <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Jean Meeus, in _Mathematical Astronomy Morsels IV_ (Richmond: Willmann-Bell, 2007), pp. 40-43, also predicted that the eclipsed sun of 20 March 2015 would be just above the visible horizon.